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280 


1936   y.2 


Kansas  Qltlg 
ptthltr  Hthrarg 


This  Volume  is  for 
REFERENCE  USE  ONLY 


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UNITED  STATES  DEPARTMEJ^pY  fcc 

JESSE  H.  JONES,  Secretary 
BUREAU  OF  THE  CENSUS 

VERGIL  D.  REED,  Acting  Director 


RELIGIOUS  BODIES  :  1936 

VOLUME  II 
PART  1 

DENOMINATIONS 
A  to  J 

STATISTICS,  HISTORY,  DOCTRINE 
ORGANIZATION,  AND  WORK 


Prepared  under  the  supervision  of 

Dr.  T.  F.  MURPHY 
Chief  Statistician  for  Religious  Statistics 


UNITED  STATES 

GOVERNMENT  PRINTING  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON  :  1941 


For  sal©  by  the  Superintendent  oi  Documents,  Washington,  D,  C.        -        -        -        Price  $1.25  (Buckram) 


RELIGIOUS  BODIES  :  1936 


This  report  is  published  in  two  volumes,  as  follows: 
VOLUME   L— SUMMARY  AND  DETAILED  TABLES, 

VOLUME  II.-— SEPAEATE  DENOMINATIONS: 

STATISTICS,  HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  ORGANIZATION,  AND  WORK. 

Part  1. — Denominations  A  to  J. 
Part  2.— Denominations  K  to  Z. 
ii 


LETTER  OF  TRANSMITTAL 


DEPARTMENT  OF  COMMERCE, 

BUREAU  OF  THE  CENSUS, 

Washington,  D.  C.,  February  20, 1941. 
SIR: 

I  transmit  herewith  part  1  of  volume  II  of  the  1936  Census  of 
Religious  Bodies.  Volume  II  is  published  in  two  parts  and  presents 
detailed  statistics  and  descriptive  statements  of  the  history,  doctrine, 
organization,  and  work  of  each  of  the  denominations.  These  statistics 
and  statements,  comprising  256  denominations,  were  published  first 
in  78  separate  bulletins.  The  data  were  obtained  by  mail  and  personal 
canvass  in  connection  with  the  1936  Census  of  Religious  Bodies. 
#  #  #  #  #  #  .  # 

The  collection  and  pompilation  of  these  statistics  were  under  the 
supervision  of  Dr.  T.  F.  Murphy,  Chief  Statistician  for  General 
Information,  Records,  and  Religious  Statistics. 

VERGIL  D.  REED, 
Acting  Director  of  the  Census. 
Hon.  JESSE  H.  JONES, 

Secretary  oj  Commerce. 

IH 


CONTENTS 


Page 

Introduction ix 

Explanation  of  terms x 

Adventist  bodies 3 

Advent  Christian  Church 7 

Seventh-day  Adventist  Denomination 18 

Church  of  God  (Adventist) 32 

Life  and  Advent  Union 38 

Church  of  God  (Oregon,  111.) 42 

Primitive  Advent  Christian  Church 48 

African  Orthodox  Church 49 

American  Ethical  Union 53 

American  Rescue  Workers 56 

Apostolic  Overcoming  Holy  Church  of  God 60 

Assemblies  of  God,  General  Council _**  63 

Assyrian  Jacobite  Apostolic  Church 73 

Bahd'is 76 

Baptist  bodies 83 

Northern'  Baptist  Convention 91 

Southern  Baptist  Convention 114 

• — -Negro  Baptists 143 

General  Six  Principle  Baptists 156 

Seventh  Day  Baptists 159 

Free  Will  Baptists 167 

—United  American  Free  Will  Baptist  Church  (Colored) 176 

General  Baptists 181 

Separate  Baptists 188 

"Regular  Baptists 194 

United  Baptists •_ 200 

Duck  River  and  Kindred  Associations  of  Baptists  (Baptist  Church 

of  Christ) 207 

•»»•  -  'Primitive  'Baptists 212 

Colored  Primitive  Baptists 226 

Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit  Predestinarian  Baptists 234 

Independent  Baptist  Church  of  America 239 

America'n  Baptist  Association 243 

.Christian  Unity  Baptist  Association 251 

i/  General  Association  of  Regular  Baptist  Churches  in  the  United  States 

of  America 254 

Seventh  Day  Baptists  (German,  1728) 259* 

National  Baptist  Evangelical  Life  and  Soul  Saving  Assembly  of  the 

United  States  of  America 263 

Brethren,  German  Baptist  (Dunkers) 266 

Church  of  the  Brethren  -(Conservative  Dunkers) 267 

Old  German  Baptist  Brethren  (Old  Order  Dunkers) 278 

The  Brethren  Church  (Progressive  Dunkers) 283 

Church  of  God  (New  Dunkers) 289 

Brethren,  Plymouth 291 

Plymouth  Brethren  I 294 

Plymouth  Brethren  II 299 

Plymouth  Brethren  III 307 

Plymouth  Brethren  IV 311 

Plymouth  Brethren  V 316 

Plymouth  Brethren  VI 321 

Plymouth  Brethren  VII 324 

Plymouth  Brethren  VIII 326 

v 


VI  CONTENTS 

Page 

Brethren,  River 329 

Brethren  in  Christ . . 331 

Old  Order  or  Yorker  Brethren— - -. 337 

United  Zion's  Children 339 

Buddhist  Mission  of  North  America 341 

Catholic  Apostolic  Church . 347 

Christadelphians 351 

The  Christian  and  Missionary  Alliance 358 

Christian  Union . . .„ 366 

Christ's  Sanctified  Holy  Church  Colored „ 373 

Church  of  Armenia  in  America . 377 

Church  of  Christ  (Holiness)  U.  S.  A ..  — .. 385 

Church  of  Christ,  Scientist .  390 

Churches  of  God: 

Church  of  God 400 

Church  of  God  (Headquarters,  Anderson,  Ind.) 408 

The  (Original)  Church  of  God „  416 

Church  of  God  (Salem,  W.  Va.)- 421 

(Tomlinson)  Church  of  God 426 

Church  of  God  and  Saints  of  Christ _ 433 

Church  $  God  in  Christ . 441 

Church  of  the  Nazarene 449 

Churches  of  Christ 462 

Churches  of  Christ  in  Christian  Union  of  Ohio 471 

Churches  of  God,  Holiness -  473 

General  Eldership  of  the  Churches  of  God  in  North  America ,. 478 

Churches  of  the  Living  God 486 

Church  of  the  Living  God,  Christian  Workers  for  Fellowship 487 

Church  of  the  Living  God,  "The  Pillar  and  Ground  of  Truth" 493 

Churches  of  the  New  Jerusalem 498 

General  Convention  of  the  New  Jerusalem  in  the  United  States  of 

America 499 

General  Church  of  the  New  Jerusalem 507 

Congregational  and  Christian  Churches.  _ _ 512 

Congregational  Holiness  Church- .1 .- 529 

Disciples  of  Christ ,-....  533 

Divine  Science  Church ..-..  545 

Eastern  Orthodox  Churches _ 549 

Albanian  Orthodox  Church __ _  553 

American  Holy  Orthodox  Catholic  Apostolic  Eastern  Church „  557 

Apostolic  Episcopal  Church  (The  Holy  Eastern  Catholic  and  Apostolic 

Orthodox  Church) _.. _ 560 

Bulgarian  Orthodox  Church, , 563 

Greek  Orthodox  Church  (Hellenic) 566 

Holy  Orthodox  Church  in  America „__  574 

Roumanian  Orthodox  Church .-..,.  576 

Russian  Orthodox  Church „_ 581 

Serbian  Orthodox  Church _ „  592 

Syrian  Antiochian  Orthodox  Church , . 597 

Ukrainian  Orthodox  Church  of  America .,.  602 

'Evangelical  and  Reformed  Church _ ,,.  605 

.Evangelical  Church ._ 619 

.Evangelical  Congregational  Church _ 630 

Evangelistic  associations _ 636 

Apostolic  Christian  Church 638 

Apostolic  Christian  Church  (Nazarean) 642 

Apostolic  Faith  Mission. _ 646 


CONTENTS  VII 


Evangelistic  associations  —  Continued. 

Christian  Congregation  _________________________________________  650 

Church  of  Daniel's  Band  _______________________________________  651 

Church  of  God  (Apostolic)  ______________________________________  653 

Church  of  God  as  Organized  by  Christ  ___________________________  657 

Hephzibah  Faith  Missionary  Association  _________________________  661 

Metropolitan  Church  Association  ......  ____________________  ......  665 

Missionary  Church  Association  .....  _____________________________  668 

Missionary  Bands  of  the  World  _________________________________  673 

Pillar  of  Fire  __________________________________________________  677 

Federated  Churches  ________________________________________________  683 

Fire  Baptized  Holiness  Church  of  God  of  the  Americas  _________________  693 

Friends  ___________________________________________________________  697 

Society  of  Friends  (Orthodox)  ___________________________________  698 

Society  of  Friends  (Hicksite)  ____________________________________  71  1 

Orthodox  Conservative  Friends  (Wilburite)  _______________________  718 

Friends  '(Primitive)  __________________________________________  „_  723 

Holiness  Church  ___________________________________________________  724 

Independent  Churches  _____________________________________________  727 

Independent  Negro  Churches  _______________________________________  735 

International  Church  of  the  Foursquare  Gospel  ________________________  739 

Italian  bodies  _____________________________________________________  747 

General  Council  of  the  Italian  Pentecostal  Assemblies  of  God  _______  748 

The  Unorganized  Italian  Christian  Churches  of  North  America  ______  752 

Jewish  Congregations  _____________________________________    ________  756 

Index  ____________________________  ..............  __________________  773 


INTRODUCTION 


The  Census  of  Religious  Bodies,  as  its  name  indicates,  is  a  census  of  religious 
organizations  rather  than  an  inquiry  into  the  religious  affiliations  of  the  individuals 
comprising  the  population  of  the  United  States.  This  census  is  taken  once  in  10 
years  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Permanent  Census  Act  approved 
March  6,  1902,  as  amended  by  the  act  of  June  7,  1906,  and  as  further  amended  by 
the  Fourteenth  Census  Act,  approved  March  3,  1919. 

The  census  of  1936  was  conducted  under  the  supervision  of  Dr.  T.  F.  Murphy, 
Chief  Statistician  for  Religious  Statistics. 

Reports  were  obtained  by  the  Bureau  of  the  Census  from  each  of  the  congrega- 
tions, churches,  or  other  local  organization  of  each  religious  body.  The  census 
data  were  thus  obtained  directly  from  the  local  churches  and  are  not  in  any  sense 
a  compilation  of  the  statistics  collected  by  the  different  denominations  and  pub- 
lished in  their  yearbooks.  Lists  of  the  local  organizations  for  1936  were  secured, 
so  far  as  possible,  from  the  denominational  headquarters,  and  much  additional 
assistance  was  rendered  by  the  officials  of  the  various  denominational  organizations. 

The  results  of  this  census  are  given  in  two  volumes.  The  statistics  were  first 
published  by  denominations,  a  bulletin  being  issued  for  each  denomination  or 
family  of  denominations  as  soon  as  the  tabulations  were  completed.  In  these 
bulletins  the  statistics  for  each  religious  body  were  shown  for  the  entire  United 
States,  and  by  States,  distinguishing  urban  and  rural  areas;  and  for  certain  denom- 
inations they  were  given  by  ecclesiastical  divisions.  Volume  II  (pts.  1  and  2), 
the  present  report,  is  a  consolidation  of  these  denominational  bulletins.  In 
volume  I  the  statistics  covering  all  of  the  denominations  are  presented  for  the 
United  States  as  a  whole,  by  States,  for  the  principal  cities,  and  to  some  extent 
by  counties;  comparisons  are  made  with  previous  censuses  where  possible;  and,  in 
addition,  there  is  a  separate  presentation  for  Negro  churches. 

The  statistics  for  1936  were  collected  mainly  by  correspondence,  but  partly 
by  the  employment  of  special  agents.  The  enumeration  of  the  Jewish  congrega- 
tions, resulting  in  the  most  complete  statistics  ever  obtained  as  to  the  number  and 
distribution  of  persons  of  the  Jewish  faith  in  the  United  States,  was  made  through 
a  special  agent,  Dr.  H.  S.  Linfield,  who  was  selected  and  generously  assisted  in 
his  work  by  the  Statistical  Bureau  of  the  Synagogue  Council  of  America. 

The  Census  of  Religious  Bodies  is  confined  to  the  continental  United  States 
only  and  does  not  include  any  outlying  possessions;  and  the  statistics  collected 
in  the  present  census  cover  either  the  calendar  year  1936  or  the  church  record 
year  which  corresponds  most  nearly  to  that  calendar  year. 

Prior  to  1906  the  census  of  religious  bodies,  with,  however,  fewer  inquiries,  was 
taken  in  connection  with  the  decennial  enumeration  of  population;  statistics 
obtained  in  conjunction  with  the  population  census  of  1880  were  never  published; 
and  data  for  the  years  1850,  1860,  and  1870,  similarly  obtained,  are  not  com- 
parable witlrthe^later  statistics. 

The  denominations  presented  in  this  report  number  256,  of  which  183  are 
grouped  in  24  families  and  73  are  listed  as  separate  denominations.  For  a  list  of  the 
denominations  included  in  part  1,  in  the  order  of  their  presentation,  see  page  V. 


X  INTRODUCTION 

Changes  in  names  since  1926  and  other  changes,  such  as  the  formation  of  new 
denominations  or  the  consolidation  of  old  ones,  are  given  for  all  denominations 
in  the  introduction  to  volume  I.  In  volume  II  (pts.  1  and  2)  such  changes  are 
explained  in  the  historical  statement  of  the  individual  denomination  and  in  the 
table  of  comparative  data;  and  in  the  case  of  the  family  groups  there  is  shown,  in 
addition,  a  statistical  summary  of  the  denominations  constituting  the  respective 
groups  for  the  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906.  In  this  statistical  summary 
which  accompanies  the  historical  statement  of  the  family  group  it  should  he 
noted  that  the  group  total  has  been  used  for  convenience  only  and  not  as  signifi- 
cant of  corporate  or  organic  unity. 

Since  churches  in  cities  and  those  in  rural  sections  piesent  different  problem* 
of  organization  and  methods  of  work,  separate  statistics  are  given  for  urban 
and  rural  churches. 

The  order  of  presentation  of  material  under  each  denomination  is  as  follows: 

1.  A  general  summary  for  the  United  States  of  all  the  statistical  items  derived 
from  the  schedules,  showing  the  distribution  of  the  figures  between  urban  and 
rural  territory. 

2.  A  comparative  summary  giving  the  available  statistics  for  the  censuses  of 
1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

3.  Tables  giving,  by  States,  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches 
classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory,  membership 
classified  by  sex,  value  of  churches  and  parsonages  and  amount  of  debt  on  church 
edifices,  church  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 

4.  Somewhat  less  detailed  data  for  ecclesiastical  divisions,  such  as  presbyteries, 
dioceses,  synods,  etc.,  where  these  exist. 

5.  A  statement  of  the  history,  doctrine,  and  organization  of  each  denomination. 
This  statement  in  many  cases  was  substantially  the  same  as  that  furnished  in 
1926,  but  it  has  been  submitted  to  the  official  of  the  organization  whose  name  is 
given  and  has  been  revised  to  date  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form.     In 
the  case  of  new  bodies  the  historical  statement  was  supplied  by  a  competent  per- 
son of  the  denomination. 

EXPLANATION  OF  TERMS 

Following  is  an  explanation  of  the  terms  used  in  the  statistical  tables,  which, 
as  stated  above,  are  presented  under  each  denomination. 

Churches. — The  term  "church"  is  applied  to  any  organization  of  persons  for 
religious  worship,  whether  under  the  name  of  church,  meeting,  mission,  station, 
etc.,  which  has  a  separate  membership,  that  is,  no  members  of  which  are  included 
in  the  membership  of  any  other  similar  organization.  Thus  each  congregation 
of  a  Methodist  circuit  is  counted  as  a  church,  and  likewise  each  preparative 
meeting  of  a  Friends  monthly  meeting,  and  each  mission  of  a  Roman  Catholic  or 
other  church,  whose  membership  is  not  included  with  the  membership  of  the 
central  church. 

Number  of  churclies. — In  the  reports  of  the  Census  of  Religious  Bodies  for 
1916  and  1906  the  total  number  of  churches,  or  organizations,  shown  for  some 
denominations  was  slightly  in  excess  of  the  number  of  churches  reporting  member- 
ship. Since  membership  figures  have  been  obtained  for  all  of  the  churches 
included  in  the  reports  for  the  years  1936  and  1926  and  for  other  reasons,  it  has 
seemed  advisable  to  use,  for  purposes  of  comparison  with  1936  and  1926,  the 
number  of  churches  reporting  membership  in  1916  and  1906.  These  figures  are 
used,  therefore,  in  the  tables  presenting  comparative  figures  for  these  earlier 
years. 


INTRODUCTION  XI 

Membership. — The  members  of  a  local  church  organization,  and  thus  of  the 
denomination  to  which  the  church  belongs,  are  those  persons  who  are  recognized 
as  constituent  parts  of  the  organization.  The  exact  definition  of  membership 
depends  upon  the  constitution  and  practice  of  the  church,  or  denomination, 
under  consideration.  Each  church  was  instructed  to  report  the  number  of  its 
members  according  to  the  definition  of  membership  as  used  in  that  particular 
church  or  organization.  In  some  religious  bodies  the  term  "member"  is  applied 
only  to  communicants,  while  in  others  it  includes  all  baptized  persons,  and  in 
still  other  bodies  it  covers  all  enrolled  persons. 

Separate  figures  are  shown  for  members  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  those  "13 
years  of  age  and  over,"  so  far  as  reported  by  the  individual  churches.  The 
membership  "13  years  of  age  and  over"  usually  affords  a  better  basis  for  com- 
parison between  denominations  reporting  membership  on  a  different  basis. 

Urban  and  rural  churches. — Urban  churches  are  those  located  in  urban  areas; 
these  areas,  as  defined  by  the  Census  Bureau  in  censuses  prior  to  1930,  included 
all  cities  and  other  incorporated  places  having  2,500  inhabitants  or  more.  For 
use  in  connection  with  the  1930  census  the  definition  has  been  slightly  modified 
and  extended  so  as  to  include  townships  and  other  political  subdivisions  (not 
incorporated  as  municipalities  nor  containing  any  area  so  incorporated)  which 
had  a  total  population  of  10,000  or  more,  and  a  population  density  of  1,000  or 
more  per  square  mile.  Rural  churches  would  be  those  located  outside  of  the 
above  areas.  Thus  to  a  very  limited  extent  the  urban  and  rural  areas,  as  reported 
for  1936,  differ  somewhat  from  these  areas  as  reported  in  the  preceding  censuses. 

Church  edifices. — A  church  edifice  is  a  building  used  mainly  or  wholly  for 
religious  services. 

Value  of  church  property. — The  term  "value  of  church  property"  was  used  in 
the  reports  of  the  Census  of  Religious  Bodies  for  1916  and  1906  and  the  term 
"value  of  church  edifices"  has  been  substituted  in  1936  and  1926.  The  figures 
are  strictly  comparable,  however,  as  exactly  the  same  class  of  property  is  covered 
by  both  terms. 

The  "value  of  church  edifices"  comprises  the  estimated  value  of  the  church 
buildings  owned  and  used  for  worship  by  the  organizations  reporting,  together 
with  the  value  of  the  land  on  which  these  buildings  stand  and  the  furniture,  organs, 
bells,  and  other  equipment  owned  by  the  churches  and  actually  used  in  connection 
with  religious  services.  Where  parts  of  a  church  building  are  used  for  social  or 
educational  work  in  connection  with  the  church,  the  whole  value  of  the  building 
and  its  equipment  is  included,  as  it  has  been  found  practically  impossible  to  make 
a  proper  separation  in  such  cases.  The  number  and  value  of  the  parsonages, 
or  pastors'  residences,  are  shown  where  the  ownership  of  such  buildings  was 
reported  by  the  churches. 

Debt. — The  summary  tables  show  the  amount  of  debt  reported  and  the  number 
of  churches  reporting  a  specific  debt,  also  the  number  of  churches  reporting  that 
they  had  "no  debt."  The  total  of  these  is,  in  most  cases,  nearly  equal  to  the 
number  reporting  the  value  of  church  edifices. 

Expenditures. — The  total  expenditures  by  the  churches  during  their  last  fiscal 
year  are  separated  in  the  reports  received  from  most  of  the  churches  into  the  items 
called  for,  as  they  appeared  on  the  schedule,  which  were  as  follows:  (1)  Pastor's 
salary;  (2)  all  other  salaries;  (3)  repairs  and  improvements;  (4)  payment  on  church 
debt,  excluding  interest;  (5)  all  local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.;  (6)  all 
other  current  expenses,  including  interest;  (7)  home  missions;  (8)  foreign  missions; 
(9)  amount  sent  to  general  headquarters  for  distribution  by  them;  (10)  all  other 
purposes. 


XII  INTRODUCTION 

Averages. — The  average  number  of  members  per  church  is  obtained  by  dividing 
the  total  membership  by  the  total  number  of  churches  shown.  The  average  value 
of  church  edifice  and  the  average  expenditure  per  church  are  obtained  by  dividing 
the  total  value  of  churches  and  the  total  expenditures,  respectively,  by  the  number 
of  churches  reporting  in  each  case. 

Sunday  schools. — The  Sunday  schools  for  which  statistics  are  presented  in  this 
report  are  those  maintained  by  the  churches  of  the  denomination  reporting,  in- 
cluding, in  some  cases,  mission  schools  or  other  Sunday  schools  conducted  by  the 
church  elsewhere  than  in  the  main  church  edifice.  The  statistics  shown  relate 
to  Sunday  schools  only  and  do  not  include  the  weekday  schools  that  are  main- 
tained by  a  number  of  denominations. 

SCHEDULE  FOR  LOCAL  CHURCH 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Following  is  a  reproduction  of  the  schedule  which  was  to  be  filled  out  for  each 
individual  church  organization. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  COMMERCE 

BUREAU  OF  THE  CENSUS 
WASHINGTON 


of  Boles:  1936 


FILL  OUT  A  SEPARATE  SCHEDULE  FOR  EACH  CHURCH 


SEE  INSTRUCTIONS  ON  THE  BACK  OF  THIS  SHEET 


YOUR  CENSUS  REPORTS  ARE  CONFIDENTIAL.— Acts  of  Congress  make  it  unlawful  to  disclose  any  fact*, 
including  names  or  identity,  from  your  census  reports.  These  laws  are  strictly  enforced.  Only  sworn  census  employees 
can  see  your  statements.  Data  collected  are  used  solely  for  preparing  statistical  information.  Your  Census  Reports 
Cannot  be  Used  for  Purposes  of  Taxation,  Regulation,  or  Investigation. 


(a)  Religious  body  or  society , . 

(6)  Division  (association,  conference,  diocese,  presbytery,  synod,  etc.)  , 

(c)  Local  name  of  church  (or  society) 

(d)  City,  town,  village,  or  township,  etc 


(«)  County  ... 


....     (/)  State  . 


MEMBERSHIP 
(See  Instructions,  pars  1  to  7) 

Report  number  of  members  according  to  definition 
of  member  in  your  church 
Number  of  members,  by  sex: 
1.  Male  .  ..    ... 

* 

A 

1 
2 
3 

4 
5 

6 

CHURCH  SCHOOLS 

(See  instructions,  para.  25  to  38) 

.Report  here  only  schools  conducted  by  this  church 
Sunday  schools: 

S5r  Number  of  officers 

* 

E 
1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 

11 
12 

13 
14 
15 
16 
D 

6 
7 

8 

26    Number  of  teachers 

2,  Female  

3*          Total  number  of  members——..    _—.,..—..._._-.. 
Number  of  members,  by  age: 

4.  Under  13  years  of  age™.™  

27.  Number  of  pupils.        ....—  —  .  ..„—    .  _.—.—._  .,„_.... 
Summer  vacation  Bible  schools: 
28.  Number  of  officers                  —           — 

29.  Number  of  teachers........—  ._„    .___._.  . 

6*         Total  number  of  members     ..     ...  —  .......—  .—..  - 

30.  Number  of  pupils 
Weekday  religions  schools: 

31U   Nymh^r  "f  off?rt«r«r         ,  u  „,    „        Jm      ,_ 

NOTE  —The  total  given  under  question  8  should  be  the  same  as  the  total  ot 
mates  and  females  given  under  question  3. 

7.  Average  attendance  per  Sunday.  

32.  Number  of  teachers 

CHURCH  BUILJDINGS 

(See  instructions,  pars  8  to  13) 

9.  Value  of  church  edifices  constructed 
prior  to  1936..  .  .......  $—.—,..  
10.  Value  of  church  edifices  constructed, 

11.  Debt  on  church  property  reported 
under  inquiries  9  and  10  $  

B 
1 

2 
3 
4 
6 

6 
C 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
~D~ 

33.  Number  of  pupils......  .......  _.....___.    .......  ...„.„.„.    « 

Parochial  schools  (general  educational  work)  : 

34.  Number  of  administrative  officers..    _—..„—„.  ...... 
35.  Number  of  teachers: 
(a)  Elementary  (grades  1  to  8)  

12.  Does  church  own  pastor's  residence..    .*  ,  

13.  Value  of  pastor's  residence  (if  owned            (Yw  *  "^ 

by  church)        ...  —  .......  .........  $.„_..—  ....—....,  

36.  Number  of  pupils: 
(a)  Elementary  (grades  1  to  8) 

EXPENDITURES  DURING  YEAR 
(See  Instructions,  para.  14  to  34) 
14.  For  pastor's  salary..—.....——.——™—  $~—  —  ...  .,.„_._ 

37.  Number  of  buildings.......,...—  .......    —.—„—..._    . 

38.  Value  of  buildmgB_  $      

IS.  For  all  other  salaries    $  

Ifl.  For  repairs  and  improvements  $  
17.  For  payments  on  church  debt,  ex- 

PASTOR  OR  LEADER 

(See  Ixutractlons,  nut  38  to  43) 

39.  Name  of  p*Btor 

18.  For  all  local^relief  and  charity,  Red 

Cross  etc                                       $       .    —  -  — 

40.  Number  of  ordained  nunistera,  if 
any,  employed  aa  assistant  pas- 
tors    .  .  .  „  ...  

19.  For  all  other  current  expenses,  in- 
cluding interest.....—  .............  I...,.—  ......... 

41.  Number   of  other   churches  now 
served  by  the  pastor  or  hia  as- 

20.  For  home  missions  ...  ....  .........  $....—.  .—._,—.  ...._, 

1 
2 

3 

4 
5 

42.          Names  and  locations  of  the  churches. 

<~8«e  Instruction.  33) 

21.  For  foreign  missions  $  

(See  Instruction  22) 

22.  Amount    sent    to    general    head- 
quarters for  distribution  by  them.  $  

(A  separata  report  should  be  furnished  for  each  church) 

24.          Total  expenditures  during  year.  $  

43.  Number  of  unordained  full-time 

Period  covered  by  this  report  : 

(Signature  of  person 
furnishing  information) 

From  ,  198... 

(Official  title) 

to                                                       193 

*  Column  for  Census  Office  Use  Only. 

n—  iMor 

INSTRUCTIONS  FOR  COMPLETION  OF  SCHEDULE 

Fill  out  a  separate  schedule  for  each  church.    Additional  schedules  will  be  sent  to  you  upon  request. 

Please  answer  each  question  to  the  best  of  your  ability,  sign  your  name,  stating  your  official  title  (or  your  con- 
nection with  the  church  or  organization)  and  your  post-office  address  in  the  spaces  provided  at  tho  bottom  of  the 
form.  The  schedule  should  be  returned  promptly  in  the  accompanying  official  envelope  which  rccmircs  no  postage. 

Date  of  census.— This  census  relates  to  the  year  1930,  If  your  church  records  are  for  tho  calendar  year, 
the  financial  information  and  membership  should  be  reported  as  of  December  31,  1936.  If  your  church  year  is 
not  the  same  as  the  calendar  year,  indicate  that  fact,  in  which  case  tho  information,  should  be  reported  for  your 
church  year,  beginning  not  later  than  March  1,  1936.  For  example,,  where  the  church  year  begins  March  1,  the 
financial  information  should  be  reported  for  the  church  year  beginning  on  that  date,  and  membership  should  bo 
reported  as  of  the  last  day  of  your  church  year,  February  28,  1937.  Indicate  the  period  for  which  the  report  is 
furnished  in  the  space  provided  in  the  lower  left-hand  corner  on  the  face  of  the  schedule. 

Definition,  of  church. — The  term  "church"  as  used  by(  the  Census  Bureau  represents  any  organization 
for  religious  worship  which  has  a  separate  membership,  whether  it  is  called  a  church,  congregation,  meeting,  society, 
mission,  station,  or  chapel,  etc.  This  report  should  also  include  all  organizations  of  an  ethical  character  which 
people  regularly  attend  instead  of  a  church. 


MEMBERSHIP 

The  figures  for  number  of  members  should  Include  all  persons 
who  are  members  of  your  church  according  to  the  definition  of 
member  in  your  church  or  organization.  In  some  religious 
bodies,  the  term  "member"  is  limited  to  communicants;  in  the 
Eastern  Orthodox  Churches,  the  Roman  Catholic  Church,  the 
Lutheran  Church,  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church,  and  some 
others,  it  includes  all  baptized  persons,  and  in  still  other  bodies 
it  covers  all  enrolled  persons. 

lt  2,  3. — Give  in  this  section  the  total  number  of  members 
in  this  church  or  organization  only.  Enter  under  Question  1 
tho  number  of  males,  under  Question  2  the  number  of  females, 
and  under  Question  3  the  aum  of  these  two,  which  wilj  represent 
the  total  number  of  members  in  your  church  or  organization. 

4. — Under  Question  4  enter  the  number  of  members  of  Ihis 
church  who  are  under  13  years  of  age.  Do  not  report  Sunday- 
school  scholars  here,  unless  they  are  also  members  of  the  church. 

B. — Under  Question  5  report  the  number  of  members  13 
years  of  age  and  over. 

6. — Under  Question  6  give  the  total  number  of  members  (the 
sum  of  the  figures  reported  in  answer  to  Questions  4  and  5). 
Please  make  a  careful  estimate  of  the  number  of  members  in 
each  age  group  if  actual  figures  are  not  available. 

7.-~-Undcr  Question  7  report  the  average  attendance  at  church 
per  Sunday.  This  can  be  arrived  at  by  making  a  count,  as 
nearly  as  possible,  of  the  number  of  persons  present  each  Sunday 
for  several  Sundays. 

CHURCH  BUILDINGS 

8. — A  church  "edifice"  is  a  building  used  mainly  for  religious 
services.  If  services  are  held  in  a  hall,  school  house,  or  private 
house,  indicate  that  fact  in  reply  to  Question  8.  Such  a  building 
is  not  a  church  edifice,  and  ita  value  should  not  be  reported 
under  Question  9. 

9. — Report  under  Question  9  the  value  of  the  church  edifice, 
together  with  the  land  on  which  it  stands  and  all  furniture-, 
organs,  bells,  and  furnishings  owned  by  the  church  and  actually 
used  m  connection  with  church  services.  Do  not  include  here 
either  the  value  of  buddings  hired  for  church  use  or  of  buildings 
owned  by  the  church  but  not  used  for  religious  services.  Where 
parts  of  the  church  building  are  used  for  social  or  organization 
work  in  connection  with  the  church,  the  whole  value  of  tho 
building  and  its  equipment  should  be  included,  as  it  is  practically 
impossible  to  make  any  separation  in  such  a  case.  Tho  value 
of  buildings  used  for  school  purposes  should  be  reported  under 
Question  38, 

10. — The  total  amount  of  money  expended  for  the  construc- 
tion of  new  church  buildings  should  be  reported  under  Question 
10.  Do  not  include  any  of  this  amount  in  the  value  of  church 
edifices  as  reported  under  Question  9.  The  value  given  for  the 
church  edifice  should  be  the  current  market  value  as  nearly 
as  this  can  be  ascertained. 

11. — Give  the  total  debt  upon  the  church  edifices  reported 
under  Question  9  and  those  reported  under  construction  under 
Question  10. 

13. — The  value  of  the  pastor's  residence,  if  owned  by  the 
church,  should  be  reported  under  Question  13.  If  actual 
figures  are  not  available  a  carefully  prepared  estimate  will 
be  accepted. 

EXPENDITURES 

In  this  section,  report  the  amounts  expended  by  this  church 
only  during  the  last  calendar  or  church  year.  Please  indicate  the 
period  covered  by  this  report  in  the  space  provided  for  the  pur- 
pose in  the  lower  left-hand  corner  of  the  schedule. 

14. — In  answer  to  Question  14,  give  the  annual  salary  of  the 
pastor.  If  the  pastor's  salary  consists  of  voluntary  contribu- 
tions or  is  made  up  partly  of  such  contributions,  estimate  the 
value  of  these  contributions  and  include  them  in  item  14. 

15. — Under  Question  16  report  the  total  amount  paid  for  all 
other  salaries, 'including  assistant  pastors,  clerks,  the  choir, 
janitor,  and  au  other  salaried  employees. 

Authority  for  collection  of 

Congress  approved  June  7,  1006.  a 
schedule,  applicable  to  the  religious 
not  exceeding  00  days,  or  both? aad  1 
8-4070 


formation  —  The  Information  to  bo  used  as  a  basis  of  religious  statistics  Is  collected  by 
June  18.  1020    These  Aots  make  it  the  duty  of  every  person  (n  charge  or 
.  ^Jy,  church,  or  organisation,  and  upon  refusal  or  neglect  to  comply,  such 
it  any  cuoh  person  willfully  gives  falsa  wswora,  ho  is  subject  to  a  too  not 


16.  —  Question  16  should  include  all  expenditures  during  the 
year  for  the  repair  and  improvement  of  the  church  edifice  and 
pastor's  residence. 

17.  —  The  total  of  all  payments  made  on  church  debt,  not 
including  interest,  should  oe  given  in  answer  to  Question  17. 

18.—  Under  Question  18  report  the  amount  collected  and 
distributed  by  this  church  for  local  relief,  charity  and  all  other 
benevoleat  purposes  This  amount  should  represent  the  dis- 
tribution made  by  this  church  In  some  religious  bodies,  con- 
tributions are  given  specifically  for  distribution  by  the  individual 
church  and  it  is  this  amount  which  should  be  reported  in  answer 
to  this  question. 

19.—  Under  Question  19  report  all  other  running  expenses 
of  thia  church,  including  interest  on  the  church  debt,  which  are 
necessary  to  carry  on  the  work  of  the  church  during  the  year. 
These  items  will  include  rent,  fuel,  light,  expenses  of  the  Sunday 
school,  and  all  other  maintenance  costs. 

20,  21.  —  Under  Questions  20  and  21  report  tho  amount  given 
by  this  church  ,for  homo  (or  domestic)  and  foreign  missions. 
In  some  religious  bodies,  an  annual  assessment,  based  on  the 
membership  or  income  of  the  church,  is  made  for  these  purposes 
and  the  total  amount  is  sent  to  headquarters  to  bo  distributed. 
If  this  is  tho  case  and  tho  figures  cannot  bo  separated,  please 
answer  "None"  for  Questions  20  and  21  and  report  in.  22  the 
total  amount  contributed  for  this  purpose. 

22.  —  If  a  lump  sum  is  sent  to  general  headquarters  for  all 
benevolent  purposes,  it  should  be  reported  under  Question  22. 

23.  —  Question  23  should  include  all  other  expenses  not  re- 
ported under  Questions  14  to  22,  inclusive,  and  together  with 
these  items  should  represent  the  total  expenditures  made  by 
this  church  during  the  fiscal  year. 

24.  —  Total  expenditures  will  appear  in  answer  to  Question  24. 

CHURCH  SCHOOLS 

Report  in  this  section  only  schools  which  are  conducted  by 
this  church.  If  an  individual  serves  as  an  officer  and  teacher 
in  any  of  the  types  of  school  mentioned  in  this  inquiry,  be 
should  be  reported  under  that  question  which  requires  tho  greater 
part  of  bis  time;  for  example,  if  a  person  devotes  tho  major 
portion  of  his  time  to  teaching  and  incidentally  serves  in  a 
supervisory  capacity,  he  should  be  reported  as  a  teacher  and 
not  as  an  official,  except  in  the  case  of  tho  Sunday-school  super- 
intendent who  should  always  be  reported  as  an  officer.  If  tha 
church  has  n6  Sunday  school,  summer  vacation  Bible  school, 
or  other  type  of  school  named  in  this  inquiry  write  "None." 

27,  30,  33,  36-—  -Questions  27,  30,  33,  and  36  should  repre- 
sent the  number  of  enrolled  pupils  who  attend  these  schoola. 
If  the  church  conducts  a  summer  vacation  Bible  school,  or  a 
week-day  religious  school,  report  only  the  members  of  this 
church  who  are  in  attendance 

37,  38.  —  Under  Questions  37  and  38  should  be  reported  the 
number  of  buildings  used  for  school  purposes,  together  with  their 
value.  Value  of  school  buildings  owned  by  this  church  should 
be  reported  under  Question  38  and  not  under  Questions  9  or  10. 

PASTOR  OR  LEADER 

39..  —  in  most  cases  these  questions  will  be  self-explanatory. 
If  your  organization  is  one  of  those  which  does  not  use  the  term 
"pastor",  give  under  Question  39  the  name  of  the  person  in 
charge  of  the  local  church  or  organization,  and  consider  him  in 
place  of  the  pastor  in  answering  the  other  questions  in  this 
section. 

43.  —  In  many  churches  there  are  a  number  of  lay  workers 
who  are  employed  by  the  church  to  carry  on  its  numerous 
activities.  They  may  be  engaged  in  welfare  work,  missions,  or 
other  duties  and  their  total  number  should  be  reported  under 
Question  43. 

REMARKS 

Under  remarks  furnish  any  additional  information  which 
you  believe  will  enable  the  Bureau  to  more  fully  understand 
your  report. 

s  collected  by  tho  Census  Bureau  under  authority  of  Acts  of 
any  religious  bod?  to  answer  all  questions  on  tba  crlntod 
on  is  subject  to  a  fine  not  exceeding  $600  or  to  Imprisonment 
son  moot  not  excoedtaff  ona  ywir,  or  bath 


XIV 


SEPARATE  DENOMINATIONS 


STATISTICS,  HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  ORGANIZATION,  AND  WORK 


ADVENTIST 


GENERAL  STATEMENT 

What  is  known  as  the  "Advent  movement"  originated  with  William  Miller, 
who  was  born  at  Pittsfield,  Mass.,  February  15,  1782,  and  died  in  Low  Hampton, 
N.  Y.,  December  20,  1849.  He  bore  a  good  reputation  as  a  farmer  and  citizen, 
served  as  a  captain  in  the  War  of  1812,  and  was  a  diligent  student  and  a  great 
reader,  although  he  had  only  a  common-school  education.  For  some  years  he 
was  an  avowed  deist,  but,  as  he  said,  "found  no  spiritual  rest"  until,  in  1816,  he 
was  converted  and  united  with  the  Baptists.  After  his  conversion,  as  objections 
to  the  authenticity  and  inspiration  of  the  Scriptures  were  pressed  upon  him  in  the 
same  way  that  he  had  formerly  pressed  them,  upon  others,  he  determined  to 
devote  himself  to  a  careful  study  of  the  Bible,  laying  aside  commentaries  and 
using  the  marginal  references  and  Cruden's  Concordance  as  his  only  helps.  As 
a  result  of  this  study  he  became  satisfied  that  the  Bible  is  its  own  interpreter, 
and  that  it  is  "a  system  of  revealed  truths,  so  clearly  and  simply  given  that  the 
'wayfaring  man,  though  a  fool,  need  not  err  therein.7  " 

At  that  time  very  little  was  heard  from  pulpit  or  press  respecting  the  second 
coming  of  Christ,  the  general  impression  being  that  it  must  be  preceded  by  the 
conversion  of  the  world  and  the  millennium,  a  long  period  of  universal  holiness 
and  peace.  As  Mr.  Miller  studied  the  prophetic  portions  of  the  Bible,  he  became 
convinced  that  the  doctrine  of  the  world's  conversion  was  unscriptural;  that 
not  only  the  parable  of  the  wheat  and  the  tares,  as  explained  by  Christ  in  Matthew 
xiii,  24-30,  36-43,  but  many  other  passages,  teach  the  coexistence  of  Christianity 
and  anti-Christianity  while  the  gospel  age  lasts.  As  the  period  of  a  thousand 
years,  during  which  Satan  is  bound,  mentioned  in  Revelation  xx,  and  from  which 
the  conception  of  the  millennium  is  derived,  lies  between  the  first  resurrection 
(Rev.  xx,  4-6),  which  he  understood  to  include  all  of  the  redeemed,  and  that  of 
"the  rest  of  the  dead"  (Rev.  xx,  5),  his  conclusion  was  that  the  coming  of  Christ 
in  person,  power,  and  glory  must  be  premillennial.  He  believed  that  at  this 
coming  there  would  be  a  resurrection  of  all  the  dead  in  Christ,  who,  together 
with  all  the  redeemed  then  alive,  would  be  '  'caught  up  to  meet  the  Lord  in  the 
air";  that  the  wicked  would  then  be  judged,  and  the  present  heavens  and  earth 
dissolved  by  fire,  to  be  followed  by  their  regeneration  as  the  inheritance  of  the 
redeemed,  involving  the  glorious,  immortal,  and  personal  reign  of  Christ  and  all 
His  saints. 

As  to  the  time  when  the  Advent  might  be  expected,  Mr.  Miller's  conclusion 
was  as  follows: 

In  examining  the  prophecies  *  *  *  I  found  that  only  four  uni- 
versal monarchies  are  predicted  in  the  Bible  to  precede  the  setting  up  of 
God's  everlasting  kingdom;  that  three  of  those  had  passed  away — 
Babylon,  Medo-Persia,  and  Grecia — and  that  the  fourth,  Rome,  ./had 
already  passed  into  its  last  state  *  *  *.  And  finding  all  the  signs 
of  the  times,  and  the  present  condition  of  the  world,  to  compare  har- 
moniously with  the  prophetic  description  of  the  last  days,  I  was  com- 
pelled to  believe  that  the  world  had  about  reached  the  limits  of  the 
period  allotted  for  its  continuance. 

Moreover,  as  a  result  of  his  study  of  prophetic  chronology,  he  believed  not 
only  that  the  Advent  was  at  hand,  but  that  its  date  might  be  fixed  with  some 
definiteness.  Taking  the  more  or  less  generally  accepted  view  that  the  "days" 
of  prophecy  symbolize  years,  he  was  led  to  the  conclusion  that  the  2,300  days 
referred  to  in  Daniel  viii,  13,  14,  the  beginning  of  which  he  dated  from  the  com- 
mandment to  restore  Jerusalem,  given  in  457  B.  C.  (Daniel  ix,  25),  and  the  1,335 
days  of  the  same  prophet  (xii,  12),  which  he  took  to  constitute  the  latter  part  of 
the  2,300  days,  would  end  coincidently  in  or  about  the  year  1843.  The  cleansing 

3 


4  CENSUS   OF  EELIGIOUS  BODIES,    1936 

of  the  sanctuary,  which  was  to  take  place  at  the  close  of  the  2,300  days  (Daniel 
viii,  14),  he  understood  to  mean  the  cleansing  of  the  earth  at  the  second  coming 
of  Christ,  which,  as  a  result  of  his  computations,  he  confidently  expected  would 
occur  some  time  between  March  21,  1843,  and  March  21,  1844,  the  period  cor- 
responding to  the  Jewish  year. 

The  public  labors  of  Mr.  Miller,  according  to  the  best  evidence  to  be  obtained, 
date  from  the  autumn  of  1831,  when  he  accepted  an  invitation  to  go  to  Dresden, 
N.  Y.,  to  speak  on  the  subject  of  the  Lord's  return.  He  gave  several  addresses, 
with  the  result  that  many  persons  were  "hopefully  converted."  Other  invita- 
tions quickly  followed,  and  thus  began  a  work  which  in  a  few  years,  though  not 
without  opposition,  spread  far  and  wide,  ministers  and  members  of  various 
evangelical  denominations  uniting  in  the  expectation  of  the  speedy,  personal, 
and  premillennial  coming  of  Christ.  The  first  general  gathering  of  'those  inter- 
ested in  this  subject  was  held  in  Boston  in  October  1840.  The  call  for  this  gather- 
ing simply  invited  Christians  of  all  denominations  to  come  together  to  compare 
views  and  to  confer  as  to  the  best  means  of  promulgating  this  important  truth. 
The  Advent  movement  was  further  assisted  by  the  appearance  of  a  number  of 
papers,  such  as  the  Midnight  Cry,  the  Signs  of  the  Times,  and  the  Trumpet  of 
Alarm,  emphasizing  these  views. 

As  the  time  approached  when  the  coming  of  Christ  was  expected  there  was 
widespread  interest  and  elaborate  preparation.  When  the  Lord  did  not  come  in 
the  spring  of  1844,  Mr,  Miller  published  to  the  world  his  mistake.  However,  in 
the  summer  of  1844,  Samuel  Sheffield  Snow,  George  Storrs,  and  several  other 
prominent  leaders,  began  to  preach  that  the  second  advent  of  Christ  would  occur 
on  October  22,  1844,  which  was  the  date  that  year  of  the  Jewish  Day  of  Atone- 
ment. Great  numbers  of  the  Adventists  eagerly  accepted  this  view.  Mr. 
Miller  and  Joshua  V.  Himes  held  aloof  from  any  public  advocacy  of  this  theory. 
But  Mr.  Miller  did  write  a  letter  which  appeared  in  the  Advent  Herald  under 
date  of  October  16,  1844,  in  which  he  expressed  his  faith  in  this  October  date  for 
the  coming  of  Christ  and  announced  that  if  this  prediction  too  should  fail,  he 
would  suffer  twice  as  much  disappointment  as  he  had  experienced  before.  The 
passing  of  this  date  without  the  occurrence  of  the  expected  event  was  a  source 
of  great  disappointment  to  Mr.  Miller,  as  well  as  to  those  who  had  so  strongly 
advocated  it,  and  their  followers.  Mr.  Miller  did  not,  however,  to  the  end  of 
his  life,  change  his  views  with  regard  to  the  premillennial  character  of  the  Advent 
itself,  or  his  belief  that  "the  day  of  the  Lord  is  near,  even  at  the  door/1 

In  its  beginning  the  Adventist  movement  was  wholly  within  the  existing 
churches  and  there  was  no  attempt  to  establish  a  separate  denomination.  Mr. 
Miller  himself  during  the  greater  part  of  his  work  was  a  Baptist  licentiate.  In 
June  1843,  however,  the  Maine  Conference  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church 
passed  resolutions  condemning  the  movement,  and  from  that  time  considerable 
opposition  was  manifested.  In  some  cases  Adventists  were  forced  to  leave  the 
churches  of  which  they  were  members;  in  others  they  withdrew  voluntarily,  bas- 
ing their  action,  in  part,  on  the  command  to  "come  out  of  Babylon"  (Rev.  xviii, 
4),  including  under  the  term  "Babylon"  not  only  the  Roman  Catholic  Church, 
but  the  Protestant  churches.  Mr.  Miller  and  other  leaders  earnestly  deprecated 
this  interpretation,  yet  it  influenced  some  to  leave  the  old  communions. 

The  Adventists  who,  for  either  of  the  causes  mentioned,  withdrew  from  the 
existing  churches  generally  formed  organizations  of  their  own,  although  in  some 
places  they  omitted  any  formal  organization,  considering  either  that  the  time 
was  too  short  or  that  organization  was  sinful.  No  definite  move  was  made,  how- 
ever, toward  the  general  organization  of  the  adherents  of  the  Adventist  doctrines 
until  1845.  In  that  year,  according  to  an  estimate  made  by  Mr.  Miller,  there 
were  Advent  congregations  in  "nearly  a  thousand  places,  numbering  *  *  * 
some  fifty  thousand  believers."  A  conference  was  called  at  Albany,  N.  Y.,  in 
April  1845,  for  the  purpose  of  defining  their  position,  and  was  largely  attended, 
Mr.  Miller  being  present.  A  declaration  of  principles  was  adopted,  embodying 
the  views  of  Mr.  Miller  respecting  the  personal  and  premillennial  character  of 
the  second  advent  of  Christ,  the  resurrection  of  the  dead,  and  the  renewal  of  the 
earth  as  the  abode  of  the  redeemed,  together  with  cognate  points  of  doctrine, 
which  have  been  summarized  as  follows : 

1.  The  present  heavens  and  earth  are  to  be  dissolved  by  fire,  and  new  heavens 
and  a  new  earth  are  to  be  created  whose  dominion  is  to  be  given  to  "the  people 
of  the  saints  of  the  Most  High." 


ADVENTIST  BODIES  5 

2.  There  are  but  two  Advents  of  the  Saviour,  both  of  which  are  personal  and 
visible.     The  first  includes  the  period  of  His  life  from  His  birth  to  the  Ascension; 
the  second  begins  with  His  descent  from  heaven  at  the  sounding  of  the  last 
trump. 

3.  The  second  coming  is  indicated  to  be  near  at  hand,  even  at  the  doors;  and 
this  truth  should  be  preached  to  saints  that  they  may  rejoice,  knowing  that  their 
redemption  draws  nigh;  and  to  sinners  that  they  may  be  warned  to  flee  from 
the  wrath  to  come. 

4.  The  condition  of  salvation  is  repentance  toward  God  and  faith  in  the  Lord 
Jesus  Christ.     Those  who  have  repentance  and  faith  will  live  soberly  and  right- 
eously and  godly  in  this  world,  looking  for  the  Lord's  appearing. 

5.  There  will  be  a  resurrection  of  the  bodies  of  all  the  dead,  both  of  the  just 
and  the  unjust.    Those  who  are  Christ's  will  be  raised  at  His  coming;  the  rest  of 
the  dead,  not  until  a  thousand  years  later. 

6.  The  only  millennium  taught  in  the  Word  of  God  is  the  thousand  years  in- 
tervening between  the  first  resurrection  and  that  of  the  rest  of  the  dead. 

7.  There  is  no  difference  under  the  gospel  dispensation  between  Jew  and  Gentile, 
but  God  will  render  to  every  man  according  to  his  deeds.     The  only  restoration 
of  Israel  is  in  the  restoration  of  the  saints  to  the  regenerated  earth. 

8.  There  is  no  promise  of  this  world's  conversion.     The  children  of  the  king- 
dom and  of  the  wicked  one  will  continue  together  until  the  end  of  the  world. 

9.  Departed  saints  do  not  enter  their  inheritance  at  death,  that  inheritance 
being  reserved  in  heaven  ready  to  be  revealed  at  the  second  coming,  when  they 
will  be  equal  to  the  angels,  being  the  children  of  God  and  of  the  resurrection; 
but  in  soul  and  spirit  they  enter  the  paradise  of  God,  to  await  in  rest  and  com- 
fort the  final  blessedness  of  the  everlasting  kingdom. 

The  somewhat  loosely  organized  body  formed  at  the  general  conference  of 
Adventists  held  at  Albany,  N.  Y.,  in  April  1845  continued  for  a  decade  to 
include  practically  all  the  Adventists  except  those  who  held  to  the  observance 
of  the  seventh,  rather  than  the  first,  day  of  the  week  as  the  Sabbath.  In  1855 
the  discussions,  in  which  Jonathan  Cummings  had  so  prominent  a  part,  resulted 
in  the  withdrawal  of  some  members  and  the  subsequent  organization  of  the 
Advent  Christian  Church.  The  Adventists  who  continued  their  adherence  to 
the  original  body  were  for  the  most  part  those  who  believed  in  the  doctrine  of 
the  conscious  state  of  the  dead  and  the  eternal  suffering  of  the  wicked,  claiming 
on  these  points  to  be  in  accord  with  the  personal  views  of  Mr.  Miller.  They, 
however,  felt  the  need  of  closer  association,  and  in  1858  organized  at  Boston, 
Mass.,  the  American  Millennial  Association,  partly  for  the  purpose  of  publishing 
material  in  support  of  their  belief  and  partly  as  a  basis  of  fellowship.  Some 
years  later  the  members  of  this  society  adopted  the  term  " Evangelical  Advent- 
ists" as  a  denominational  name,  with  a  view  to  distinguishing  themselves  from 
other  bodies  with  which  they  differed  on  doctrinal  points. 

For  some  years  the  association  published  a  periodical  bearing  at  different 
periods  the  names,  Signs  of  the  Times,  Advent  Herald,  Messiah's  Herald,  and 
Herald  of  the  Coming  One.  It  contributed  to  the  support  of  the  China  Inland 
Mission  and  of  laborers  and  missions  in  other  fields,  but  as  the  older  members 
died  many  of  the  younger  families  joined  other  evangelical  denominations,  and 
the  number  of  churches  and  members  diminished  rapidly.  In  1906  they  re- 
ported 18  organizations  with  481  members,  16  church  edifices,  and  $27,050  as 
value  of  church  property;  9  Sunday  schools  with  57  officers  and  teachers  and  264 
scholars;  and  8  ministers.  When  the  inquiries  for  the  census  of  1916  were  made,  it 
appeared  that  all  the  churches,  except  a  few  in  Pennsylvania,  had  disbanded  or 
discontinued  all  services,  and  from  those  in  Pennsylvania  no  information  could 
be  obtained.  The  denomination  as  an  ecclesiastical  body  has,  therefore,  been 
dropped  from  this  report. 

Discussions  in  regard  to  the  nature  of  the  Advent,  and  particularly  in  regard 
to  the  future  life,  resulted  in  the  formation  of  other  bodies  independent  in 
organization  but  agreeing  in  the  belief  that  the  Advent  is  to  be  personal  and 
premillennial  and  is  near  at  hand  and  in  their  recognition  of  the  influence  of  Mr, 
Miller  and  those  immediately  associated  with  him. 

The  denominations  grouped  under  the  name  Adventist  in  1936,  1926,  1916,  and 
1906  are  listed  in  the  summary  table  following,  with  the  principal  statistics  as 
reported  for  the  four  periods.  Two  bodies  listed  in  1906  were  not  included  in  the 
table  for  1916  or  later  censuses.  The  omission  of  the  Evangelical  Adventists  is 


6 


CENSUS   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


explained  in  a  preceding  paragraph.  The  Churches  of  God  (Adventist),  Unat- 
tached Congregations,  if  any  of  these  churches  existed  in  1936,  1926,  or  1916,  were 
probably  included  among  the  independent  churches  or  merged  with  other  Ad- 
ventist bodies.  The  denomination  reported  prior  to  1936  as  "Churches  of  God  In 
Christ  Jesus"  is  more  or  less  a  local  name,  and  it  is  also  known,  in  some  localities, 
as  "Church  of  God  of  the  Abrahamic  Faith/'  An  investigation  shows  the  general 
conference  to  be  organized  under  the  name  "Church  of  God,"  but  in  order  to  dis- 
tinguish it  from  many  other  churches  of  this  name  the  location  of  its  headquarters 
is  added  for  definiteness,  as  "Church  of  God  (Oregon,  111.)." 

These  statistics  were  compiled  from  schedules  sent  directly  to  the  Bureau  by 
the  pastor  or  clerk  of  the  individual  churches  and  the  data  relate  to  these  churches 
only. 

STTMMAEY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  THE  ADVENTIST  BODIES,  1936,  1926,  1916,  AND  1906 


DENOMINATION  AND  CENSUS  YBAB 

Total  number  of  churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  report- 
ing 

Amount 

Churches  report- 
ing 

Amount 

Churches  report- 
Ing 

Scholars 

1936 

Total  for  the  group 

3,536 

165,  815 

1,758 

$8,776,620 

2,417 

$6,574,658 

1,845 

119,756 

Advont  Christian  Church 

346 

2,054 
45 
6 
71 
14 

3,578 

26,  258 

133,  254 
1,250 
352 

4,  163 

538 

146,  177 

313 

1,362 
17 
5 
48 
13 

1,819 

1,  867,  420 

0,  690.  955 
22,  090 
42,500 
137,  755 
15,300 

11,089,449 

327 

1,973 
32 
6 
65 
14 

2,336 

321,  922 

6,  196,  143 
9,  732 
8,916 
36,  308 
1,637 

7,610,863 

288 

1,  465 
25 
4 
60 
3 

1,759 

18,  702 

97,  062 
049 
181 
2,967 
195 

102,779 

Seventh-day   Adventist    Denomina- 
tion                        

Church  of  God  (Adventist).     .„  -  _ 

Life  and,  Advent  Union  

Church  of  God  (Oregon,  111  )  

Primitive  Advent  Christian  Church.. 
1926 
Total  for  the  group 

Advent  Christian  Church 

444 

1,981 
58 
7 
86 

2,667 

20,430 

110,998 
1,686 
535 
3,528 

114,915 

385 

1,363 
12 
7 
52 

1,716 

2,  310.  000 

8,477,999 
25,  850 
91,  000 
164,  600 

3,  885,  235 

379 

1,849 
39 
6 
63 

2,240 

536,  192 

6,998,988 
13,  887 
19,  861 
41,935 

2,  180,  588 

304 

1,383 
23 
7 
42 

2,246 

18,  80S 

81,  067 
685 
344 
1,877 

98,802 

Seventh-day   Adventist    Denomina- 
tion 

Church  of  God  (Adventist)  _  _ 

Life  and  Advent  Union,    .  . 

Churches  of  God  in  Christ  Jesus  .  . 
1916 
Total  for  the  group 

Advent  Christian  Church 

534 

2,011 
22 
13 

87 

2,537 

30,  597 

79,  355 
848 
658 
3,457 

92,735 

417 

1,231 
8 
8 
52 

1,471 

1,  188,  070 

2,  568,  495 
8,200 
41,  600 
78,  870 

2,  425,  209 

423 

1,737 
10 
11 
59 

274,446 

1,887,772 
2,358 
8,996 
13,  016 

379 
1.803 

21,  007 
74,  863 

Seventh-day  Adventist   Denomina- 
tion                     -         -  -  -  - 

Church  of  God  (Adventist) 

Life  and  Advent  Union        

9 

65 

2,078 

439 
2,  493 

69,  110 

Churches  of  God  in  Christ  Jesus  
1906 

Total  for  the  group  

Evangelical  Adventists 

18 
541 

1,884 
30 

10 
12 
62 

481 
26,799 

62,  211 
354 

267 
509 
2,124 

15 
428 

981 
3 

2 
6 
36 

27,050 
854,  323 

1,454,087 
4,000 

2,300 
29,  799 
53,  650 

9 
362 

1,656 
9 

5 
7 
30 

264 
16,941 

50,  225 
326 

200 
259 
895 

Advent  Christian  Church 

Seventh-day   Adventist   Denomina- 
tion. .           . 

Church  of  God  (Adventist) 

Churches  of  God  (Adventist),  Unat- 
tached Congregations 

Life  and  Advent  Union 

Churches  of  God  in  Christ  Jesus.—.. 

ADVENT  CHRISTIAN  CHURCH 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification, — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Advent  Christian  Church  for  the  year  1936  is 
presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have  been 
admitted  to  the  local  churches,  by  vote  of  the  members,  upon  profession  of  faith 
and  baptism  by  immersion. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY   OF   STATISTICS   FOE   CHURCHES   IN   URBAN   AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number  

346 

26,  258 
76 

10,  310 
15,  732 
216 
65  5 

480 
23,  606 

2,172 
2  0 

321 
313 
$1,  867,  420 
$1,819,142 
$48,  278 
$5,  966 
51 
$129,  023 
201 

117 
105 
$318,  992 

327 
$321  922 
$157^  376 
$17,  065 
$33,  220 

$22,  716 

$51,  381 
$5,  284 
$12,481 
$7,  816 
$4,  569 
$10,  014 
$984 

288 
3,059 
18,  702 

13 

86 

887 

119 

11,  976 
101 

4,664 
7,168 
144 
65.1 

280 
10,  750 
946 
2.5 

109 
107 
$1,  346,  315 
$1,  345,  437 
$878 
$12,  582 
40 
$115,916 
53 

55 
49 
$209,  792 

116 
$216,  755 
$98,  760 
$12,  796 

$22,  185 

$19,  024 

$39,  488 
$3,054 

$7,  850 
$5,  411 
$2,  757 
$5,  430 
$1,  869 

110 
1,433 
9,073 

10 
75 
710 

227 

14,  282 
63 

5,646 
8,564 

72 
65  9 

200 
12,  856 
1,226 
1.5 

212 
206 
$521,  105 
$473,  705 
$47,  400 
$2,  530 
11 
$13,  107 
148 

62 

56 
$109,  200 

211 
$105,  167 
$58,  616 
$4,  269 
$11,  035 

$3,  692 

$11,  893 
$2,  230 
$4,  631 
$2,  405 
$1,  812 
$4,  584 
$498 

178 
1,626 
9,629 

3 
11 

177 

34.4 
45.6 

65.6 
54.4 

Members,  number 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male                        

45.2 
45.6 
66  7 

54  8 
54  4 
33.3 

Female 

Sex  not  reported      _         _        .        .  .    

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age 
Under  13  years 

58  3 
45.5 
43  6 

41.7 
54.5 
56.4 

13  years  and  over                ..  _    - 

Aj?o  not  reported                                      _  - 

Percent  under  13  years  ' 

CJvurcl-.  edifices  number 

34.0 

34  2 
72.1 
74.0 

1.8 

66.0 
65.8 
27.9 
26.0 
98.2 

Value  —  number  reporting           

Amount  reported 

Constructed  prior  to  1936 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 

Dobt      rmmbor  rpnortlnff 

Amount  reported          __     __      

89.8 
26  4 

47.0 
46  7 
65.8 

35.5 
67.3 
62  8 
75.0 
66.8 

83.7 

76.9 
57  8 
62.9 
69.2 
60.3 
54.2 

10.2 
73.6 

53.0 
53.3 
34.2 

64.5 
32  7 
37.2 
25  0 
33  2 

16  3 

23.1 

42.2 
37.1 

30  8 
39.7 

45.8 

3STtimb<?r  reporting  "no  debt"                       -  -- 

Value    number  reporting 

Amount  reported                                 .._,_. 

Expenditures: 

Churches  reporting  number 

Amount  reported            -        -  -  -  

Pastors*  salaries                               

All  other  salaries            -  

Repairs  and  improvements          -  -  ------ 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest                                                                                                                            _       _  _.  

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest          _    -  -  

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.-. 
H  om©  missions                              --  

"  Iforoipjn  missions                -  -  

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution-. 
All  other  purposes  

A  verag  e  expenditure  per  church  

Sunday  schools  : 

Churches  reporting  number         -  ~-  -  - 

38.2 
46.8 
48.5 

61.8 
53.2 
51.5 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 

Scholars  -  -  -  

80  0 

20.6 

'  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


2  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

7 


CENSUS    OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  1. — SUMMARY   OF  STATISTICS  FOB   CHURCHES   IN   URBAN    AND    RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

Tn  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  l 

Urban 

Rural 

Weekday  religious  schools  : 

Churches  reporting  number 

6 
18 
167 

4 
67 
304 

2 

6 

71 

2 

31 
145 

4 

12 
96 

2 

36 
159 

Officers  End  teachers                           

Scholars         --  - 

42.5 

57.  5 

Parochial  schools: 

Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  tefichors       -      --  -      

Scholars                           -      -  -  _____  . 

47.7 

52.  3 

*  Percent  not  shown  where  ba.so  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36, — Table  2  presents,  in  con vcnientform  for  comparison, 
a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Advent  Christian  Church  for  the 
census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organizations)  ,  number  .    ------- 

346 

444 

534 

541 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census. 
Number  -           

-98 

-90 

-7 

Percent         -.          -         ,  

-22.1 

-16  9 

—  1.3 

Members,  number   -  .  

26,  258 

29,  430 

30,  597 

26,  790 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census. 
Number                             -  .  - 

-3,  172 

—  1,167 

3,798 

Percent 

—•10.8 

-3.8 

14.2 

Average  membership  per  church               _,_  _  _ 

76 

66 

57 

50 

Church  edifices,  number                      -      -  - 

321 

410 

418 

428 

Value  —  number  reporting..  -     „_  

313 

385 

417 

428 

Amount  reported               - 

$1  867,420 

$2,  310,  000 

$1,  188,  070 

$854,  323 

Average  value  per  church         -      -  -  -. 

$5,  966 

$6,000 

$2  849 

$1,  996 

rjeftt;  —  number  reporting                          .  .  - 

51 

54 

63 

57 

Amount  reported 

$129,  023 

$121,  667 

$95  970 

$78  828 

Parsonages,  number     -       -      -  -  -.- 

117 

Value  —  number  reporting    .. 

105 

111 

77 

44 

Amount  reported      

$318,  992 

$395,  150 

$143,  050 

$72,  675 

Expenditures  : 

Churches  reporting,  number      _-  

327 

379 

423 

Amount  reported                         -         - 

$321,  922 

$536  192 

$274  446 

Pastors'  salaries                   -.    -    .  -  -- 

$157,  376 

All  other  salaries 

$17  065 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$33  220 

!•    $409  241 

$233  618 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest.  ._ 
Local  relief  and  charity.  Red  Cross,  etc  

$22,  716 
$51,  381 
$5,  284 

Horn©  missions 

$12  481 

Foreign  missions 

$7,  816 

[    $112,292 

$40  828 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  

$4,  569 

All  other  purposes 

$10  014 

Not  classified--    -    

$14,  659 

Average  expenditure  per  church     --  -~  -    .-. 

$984 

$1,  415 

$649 

Sunday  schools: 

Churches  reporting,  number 

288 

304 

379 

362 

Officers  and  teachers 

3  059 

2  773 

3  134 

2  876 

Scholars...  

18,  702 

18,  806 

21,  007 

16,  941 

1  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 

State  tables, — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Advent  Chris- 
tian Church  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and 
membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or 
rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools. 
Table  4  gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for 
the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936 

-    "-*•>  "  -~-i t>       m_u1-.    K 


ADVENT    CHRISTIAN    CHURCH 


shows  the  value  of  churches  and  parsonages  and  debt  on  church  edifices  for 
1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately 
current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing 
the  financial  statistics  of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables 
5  and  6  is  limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value 
and  expenditures. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions, — Table  7  presents,  for  each  conference  in  the  Advent 
Christian  Church,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States 
in  the  preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and 
debt  on  church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND   MEMBEBSHIP  OP  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGBAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOI  S 

"3 
1 

a 

1 

*c3 

1 

I 

fl 

1 

2 
(§ 

•S 

1 

r2 
& 

£ 
*S 

? 

to 

§- 
|| 

sT 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Officers  and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States 

348 

119 

7 
8 
3 
23 
2 
9 

5 

227 

26,  258 

11,976 

889 
652 
179 
1,798 
230 
980 

300 

14,  282 

10,  310 

898 
516 

248 
747 
157 
472 

289 
28 

353 

100 
370 
72 
290 

85 
86 
125 
22 
47 

362 
669 
1,501 
350 
254 
879 

66 
11 
81 
127 

21 
154 
160 

41 
36 

195 
90 
408 

15,  732 

216 
"§5~ 

65.5 

61.9 
59.6 
65.1 
60.4 
51.6 
62.0 

67.1 

288 

3,059 

18,  702 

NEW  ENGLAND: 

Maine  

36 
25 
12 
28 
5 
12 

12 

a 

29 
17 
9 
5 
3 
3 

7 
3 

11 

"T 

2 

7 

3 
4 
3 

"I 

13 
24 
26 
6 
7 
16 

5 

2,349 
1,382 
629 
2,018 
461 
1,233 

720 
90 

813 
250 
952 
209 
726 

200 
236 
299 
42 
107 

794 
1,629 
4,037 
772 
635 
2,274 

162 
21 
205 
263 

45 
369 
370 

100 

84 

490 
209 
1,083 

1,460 
730 
450 
220 
231 
253 

420 
90 

778 

1,451 
866 
381 
1,236 
304 
761 

431 
62 

460 
150 
473 
137 
436 

115 
150 
174 
20 
60 

432 
960 
2,536 
422 
381 
1,323 

96 
10 
124 
136 

24 
215 
210 

59 
48 

295 
119 
675 

31 
24 
9 
27 
5 
10 

11 
3 

11 
1 
9 
2 

7 

1 
3 
3 
1 
2 

11 
22 
28 
6 
4 
17 

3 

330 

277 
118 
318 
81 
167 

131 
26 

80 
23 
148 
28 
75 

20 
35 
23 

7 
19 

95 
171 
227 
40 
38 
155 

22 

2,019 
1,283 
477 
1,750 
505 
814 

439 
125 

502 
203 
826 
190 
494 

107 
268 
95 
22 
70 

611 
1,457 
2,026 
276 
280 
1,016 

185 

New  Hampshire  
Vermont 

Massachusetts  

Rhode  Island  

Connecticut  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

12 

1 

9 
4 
9 

4 
4 

1 
1 
6 
2 
2 

1 

35 
250 
789 
139 
229 

126 

109" 

76.7 
66.7 
78.2 
52.6 
66.5 

73.9 
57.3 

71.8 

Indiana 

Illinois 

163 
70 
497 

74 
236 
299 

Michigan  

Wisconsin.  

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota        

Iowa 



Missouri 

3 

Nebraska 

1 
3 

13 

1 
2 

42 
95 

Kansas              .  _  ._ 

12 

794 
1,138 
2,835 
726 
484 
1,098 

126 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

83.8 
69.7 
59.2 
82.9 
66.7 
66  4 

West  Virginia 

20 
35 
7 
8 
22 

7 
1 
5 
4 

2 
9 
1 
1 
6 

2 
1 
2 

491 
1,202 
46 
151 
1,176 

36 

21 
68 

~72~ 

North  Carolina  
South  Carolina    

Georgia 

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Alabama 

3 
4 

1 
3 
3 

137 
263 

45 
176 
266 

:::: 

65.3 
93.4 

4 
1 

1 
5 
3 

3 
1 

5 
3 
11 

28 
5 

6 
40 
29 

28 
8 

84 
27 
150 

236 
20 

25 
211 
250 

185 
79 

536 
179 
941 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Louisiana 

1 

Oklahoma 

6 
4 

3 
1 

6 
3 
11 

3 
1 

3 
1 

3 

2 
10 

193 
104 

100 
84 

402 
160 
1,009 

71.6 
762 

Texas  

.... 

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho 

New  M!exico 

3 
1 
1 

PACIFIC: 
Washington      

88 
49 
74 

— 

66  1 
75.6 
60.4 

Oregon            -  .  - 

California 

i  Ratio  not  shown  wher^e  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


10 

TABLE 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936,  1926,  1916,  or  1906] 


CENSUS   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

, — NUMBER   AND    MEMBERSHIP   OF   CHURCHES,    1906   TO    1936,    AND 
MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1036 

1936 

348 

:;::.::.=:: 

36 
25 
12 

28 
5 
12 

12 
3 

12 
1 
9 
4 
9 

4 
4 
3 
1 
3 

13 
26 

35 
7 
8 
22 

7 

1936 

444 

1916 

534 

1906 

541 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

CO 

,.8 

£g 
•gR 

ID 

OT 

%& 

S£ 

£! 

ll 
ia 

§- 
£23 
8£ 
£•3 
PH 

United  States 

26,  258 

29,  430 

30,  597 

26,  799 

480 

23,  606 

2,172 

2.0 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine 

45 
24 
15 
32 

7 
14 

13 
6 

15 
4 
9 
5 
13 

4 

5 
5 
1 
5 

10 
51 
43 

7 
18 

27 

fl 

57 
33 
19 
33 
8 
19 

24 

11 

17 
7 
14 
12 
18 

4 

10 
5 
3 

7 

12 
63 
23 
7 
22 
25 

4 

37 
40 
23 
41 
7 
22 

24 
11 

20 
10 

17 
14 
17 

5 
14 
9 
6 
4 

12 
36 
23 
7 
14 
29 

2,349 
1,382 
629 
2,018 
461 
1,233 

720 
90 

813 
250 
952 
209 
726 

200 
236 
299 
42 
107 

794 
1,629 
4,037 
772 
635 
2,274 

162 
21 
205 
263 

2,132 
1,361 
738 

2,548 
661 
1,297 

625 

175 

747 
271 
1,162 
242 
645 

252 

257 
318 
27 
239 

481 
2,765 
4,165 
755 
1,522 
2,323 

80 

98 
227 
278 

20 
334 
623 

2,575 
1,570 
1,040 
2,780 
772 
1,550 

1,024 
350 

1,135 
618 
1,023 
325 
846 

296 
502 
358 
125 
341 

593 
2,629 
1,960 
789 
1,429 
1,  954 

130 
274 
296 
313 

84 
215 
651 

1,610 
1,608 
1,082 
3,  053 
761 
1,646 

1,145 
330 

782 
669 
1,054 
451 
651 

349 
608 
323 
305 

247 

507 
1,476 
1,388 
509 
917 
1,801 

32 
17 
3 
39 
1 
8 

7 

2,317 
1,157 
612 
1,913 
460 
1,057 

713 
90 

602 
225 
830 
150 
719 

165 
205 
295 
42 
106 

783 
1,493 
3,429 
753 
463 
1,818 

161 
21 
121 
261 

1.4 
1.4 
.5 
2.0 
.2 
.8 

1.0 

New  Hampshire  

208 
14 
66 

Vermont                   -  - 

Massachusetts 

Rhode  Island 

Connecticut            -.  .. 

168 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

P  ennsy  1  vania 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

17 
25 
13 

194 

2.7 
10.0 
1.5 

Indiana  „_               - 

Illinois 

109 
59 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin.  „__  

7 

1 
14 
4 

1.0 

.6 

6.4 
1,3 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL- 
Minnesota 

34 

17 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

1 

11 
12 
66 
19 
21 
80 

1 

.9 

1.4 
.8 
1.9 
2.5 
4.3 
4.2 

.6 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia  .     -    ..  

West  Virginia 

124 
542 

""IsT 

376 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina  

Georgia  _  _.  

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee         

1 

5 
4 

3 

4 
7 

1 
8 
10 

8 

7 

7 

3 

4 
11 

11 

10 
5 

3 
18 
13 

351 
413 

189 

120 
502 
411 

Alabama 

4 
2 

80 

3.2 

.8 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas      _            

Oklahoma 

6 

4 

?! 

369 
370 

100 

490 
209 
1,083 

129 

10 

7 

11 

24 
6 
13 

4 

329 
363 

89 

466 
203 
1,070 

125 

30 

2.9 
1.9 

11.0 

4.9 
2.9 
1.2 

3.1 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho     -         -         ... 

PACIFIC: 
Washington..  

6 
3 
XI 

32 

7 
5 
14 

4 

8 
12 
13 

4 

9 
10 
15 

5 

514 
230 
1,052 

266 

466 
323 
980 

281 

410 
302 
675 

155 

Oregon. 

California  

Other  States    

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 
'  Includes:    Louisiana,  1,  and  New  Mexico,  1. 


ADVENT   CHEISTIAN   CHUKCHI 


11 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OF   CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber of 
church- 
es 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  Or  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Church- 
es re- 
porting 

Amount 

Church- 
es re- 
porting 

Amount 

Church- 
es re- 
porting 

Amount 

United  States 

346 

321 

313 

$1,867,420 

51 

$129,  023 

105 

$318,  992 

28,  750 
28,  700 
11,  300 
32,  000 
17,042 
48,  500 

10,000 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine  _  

36 
25 
12 
28 
5 
12 

12 
3 

12 
9 
4 
9 

4 
4 
3 

13 

26 
35 
7 
8 
22 

7 
5 
4 

6 
4 

6 
3 
11 

11 

35 
23 

12 
25 
5 
11 

12 
3 

12 
9 
3 
9 

4 
4 
3 

13 
23 
34 

7 
6 
21 

4 
3 
4 

5 
3 

6 
3 

11 

8 

35 
23 
11 
25 
5 
11 

12 
3 

11 
9 
3 
9 

3 

4 
3 

13 
22 
34 

7 
6 
20 

3 
3 

4 

5 
3 

6 
3 
11 

36 

159,  200 
129,  500 
62,  000 
309,  100 
65,  737 
265,  000 

83,  100 
4,500 

34,  930 
98,  800 
12,  700 
32,  900 

30,000 
6,200 
2,900 

15,  550 
84,  800 
102,  128 
19;  400 
8,150 
60,  025 

5,000 
3,800 
1,950 

9,  500 

11,  250 

50,  000 
9,  500 
167,  000 

22,  800 

3 

4 

9,500 
3,675 

13 

10 
5 

7 
3 

7 

5 

New  Hampshire  

Vermont 

Massachusetts  

5 
1 
6 

2 

27,  709 
500 
6,235 

3,800 

Rhode  Island. 

Connecticut 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

Pennsylvania  _ 

EAST  NOKTH  CENTRAL- 

Ohio  -,. 

1 
3 
1 
3 

1 

5,000 
27,  600 
4,256 
5,112 

850 

1 
8 
1 
6 

1 
3 

0 
29,  700 
0) 
18,  100 

(9 

5,200 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin          

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota..  

Missouri 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

2 
2 
3 

4 

0) 

0) 
2,750 
8,450 

West  Virginia  . 

1 
5 
1 

8,450 
3,888 
5,300 

North  Carolina   -       _  . 

South  Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

2 

1,796 

7 
1 

14,  400 
0) 

KAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Alabama 

TvTississipp  i 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Oklahoma 

2 
2 

2 

1,  052 
950 

2,850 

Texas              ..           - 

1 
4 

0) 
6,500 

PACIFIC: 

Washington  

Oregon 

California  

4 
2 

9,000 
1,500 

8 
3 

31,800 
25,  800 

Other  States 

i  Amount  included  in  figures  for  "Other  States,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual 
church. 
3  Includes:  Indiana,  I;  Nebraska,  1;  Kansas,  1;  Tennessee,  1;  and  Idaho,  2, 


12 


CENSUS   OE   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting} 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

Total 
number  of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
report- 
ing 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Repairs 
and  im- 
.  prove- 
inonta 

United  States 

346 

327 

$321,  922 

8157,376 

19,  850 
17,  819 
6,954 
23,  993 
4,409 
12,  278 

7,148 
979 

2,074 
5,  197 
1,400 
4,699 

1,400 
686 
175 

1,335 
5,  548 
6,831 
2,  405 
1,508 
6,238 

17 
250 
109 

707 
1,707 

985 

5,  422 
1,302 
11,529 

2,422 

$17,065 

780 
1,  521 
201 
4,061 
468 
1,  665 

579 

$33,220 

3,512 
3,  271 
1,190 
8,141 
492 
3,102 

682 
114 

307 
922 
200 
66 

489 
139 
20 

466 
697 
2,  125 
515 
714 
1,596 

80 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine      

36 
25 
12 
28 
5 
12 

12 
3 

12 
9 

4 
9 

4 
4 
3 

13 
2fi 
35 
7 
8 
22 

7 
5 
4 

6 
4 

3 

6 
3 
11 

8 

36 
24 
11 
28 
5 
11 

12 
3 

11 
9 
3 
9 

4 
4 
3 

13 
21 
34 
7 

7 
17 

5 
& 
3 

5 
4 

3 

6 
3 

11 

1  7 

36,  423 
30,  834 
11,  609 
60,  566 
8,  153 
27,  462 

12,  317 
1,408 

3,871 
11,  094 
2,866 
9,120 

3,462 
2,160 
365 

2,  755 
8,  0-43 
15,  586 
4,224 
2,602 
12,  305 

1,292 
322 
289 

2,217 
3,360 

1,284 

12,  019 
2,214 
27,  659 

4,041 

New  Hampshire 

Vermont  

Massachusetts         _-  -  ...... 

Rhode  Island  ~  

Connecticut              -      

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Now  York 

Pennsylvania.    -    

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio        -              

212 
760 

Illinois  .  .  

Michigan       .  .  

Wisconsin 

639 

700 
8 
20 

139 
627 

761 
27 
104 
274 

12 
10 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa        -               --- 

Missouri 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

West  Virginia    --  .  -..    .  

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina  .    _-_.  

Georgia            -  -                -  --      

Florida—  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  _  -.» 

Alabama           -               -„ 

Mississippi  «... 

155 

515 
725 

81 

820 
201 
1,  783 

100 

WERT  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Oklahoma  .„  .-. 

112 
72 

94 

902 
48 
1,981 

288 

Texas           .  ..                      _       . 

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho       .. 

PACIFIC- 
Washington 

Oregon  _  .-. 

California-. 

Other  States    

i  Includes:  Indiana,  1;  Nebraska,  1;  Kansas,  2;  Tennessee,  1;  Louisiana,  1;  and  Now  Mexico,  1, 


ADVENT    CHRISTIAN    CHUECH 


13 


TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 — Continued 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


EXPENDI 

TURES—  CO 

ntinued 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

Payment 
n  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
includ- 
ing in- 
terest 

Local 
relief 
and 
charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral head- 
quarters 

All  other 
purposes 

United  States      .  „    _ 

$22,  716 

851  381 

$5  284 

$12  481 

$7  816 

$4  569 

$10,  014 

fsw  ENGLAND: 

Maine  _  

2,803 

4,931 

367 

871 

985 

648 

1,676 

New  Hampshire  

800 

4,308 

753 

661 

571 

216 

914 

Vermont  .-  - 

210 

1  237 

104 

328 

318 

577 

490 

Massachusetts 

8,109 

10.  374 

829 

2  009 

1  439 

794 

817 

Rhode  Island 

1  607 

383 

197 

252 

45 

300 

Connecticut 

956 

6  984 

346 

949 

395 

410 

377 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

225 

2  238 

132 

311 

318 

93 

591 

Pennsylvania  

108 

22 

123 

62 

2AST  NOETII  CENTRAL: 
Ohio       -          

960 

88 

145 

5 

80 

Illinois                    - 

75 

3  374 

132 

230 

164 

240 

Michigan 

847 

212 

6 

201 

"Wisconsin 

753 

1,584 

159 

174 

374 

260 

412 

VEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota      ---  

75 

446 

30 

202 

77 

16 

27 

Iowa             -  

699 

330 

90 

1 

1 

123 

83 

Missouri                         -  

73 

10 

18 

5 

44 

OUTH  ATLANTIC  : 
Virginia 

80 

246 

50 

202 

57 

23 

157 

West  Virginia 

115 

234 

103 

142 

10 

71 

496 

North  Carolina 

1  753 

976 

471 

1,580 

178 

66 

845 

South  Carolina 

360 

450 

35 

246 

106 

80 

Georgia    »    ,  

13 

26 

75 

66 

3 

25 

68 

Florida        

557 

1,256 

229 

1,230 

424 

131 

370 

SAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

15 

640 

10 

18 

500 

Alabama 

12 

50 

[Mississippi 

25 

I?VEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

387 

246 

10 

55 

185 

Texas 

180 

355 

90 

201 

20 

10 

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho 

57 

15 

28 

24 

PACIFIC: 

Washington        -         -  

700 

1,992 

262 

406 

138 

843 

534 

96 

219 

4 

74 

250 

20 

California 

3,483 

4,623 

397 

1,844 

1,426 

188 

405 

Other  StatGiS.     ,  

272 

648 

111 

23 

117 

20 

40 

14 


CENSUS   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  CONFERENCES, 
1936 


CONFERENCE 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDI- 
TURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Scholars 

Total  

346 

26,258 

313 

$1,867,420 

51 

$129,023 

327 

$321,  922 

288 

18,  702 

Catsldlls  -... 

3 

14 

7 

10 
2 

17 
8 
8 
1 

36 

24 
1 
3 
4 

4 
10 
25 
6 
5 

5 

7 

1 
3 

11 

6 

19 

6 
6 

23 
2 

1 

6 

10 

1 

5 
24 

4 
8 
10 

207 
1,437 
162 

1,073 
130 

2,380 
456 
444 
45 

2,349 
1,  709 
59 
231 
200 

263 
650 
1,382 
325 
205 

329 
844 

14 
90 
801 

369 
1,920 

483 
754 

2,114 
108 
250 

265 
706 

21 
454 
1,464 

443 
356 
760 

3 

14 
3 
10 

16 

7 
7 

10,  000 
303,  500 
5,000 

26,400 
0) 

34,578 
57,000 
32,  500 

1 
6 

500 
6,  235 

14 

r 

10 

1 

16 

8 
7 
1 

36 
24 
1 
2 
4 

3 

9 
24 
6 
5 

5 

7 

1 
3 
10 

5 
19 

5 
6 

18 
2 
1 

6 

10 

1 
5 
22 

4 
8 
10 

1,338 
31,  958 
1,292 

6,498 
0 

5,543 

10,  228 
6,487 
0) 

36,  423 
55,  106 
CO 
(0 
3,462 

289 
3,197 
30,  834 
6,837 
322 

7,858 
10,  194 

0) 
1,408 
3,841 

2,217 
11,944 

8,  153 
19,  801 

10,  638 
0) 
0) 

723 
2,444 

0) 
3,601 
7,661 

10,  453 
5,064 
9,905 

6,203 

2 
13 
3 

8 
1 

12 
7 
6 
1 

31 

23 
1 
1 

1 

1 
9 
24 
6 
4 

5 

7 

48 
989 
185 

456 
120 

969 
343 
333 
25 

2,019 
1,506 
70 
40 
107 

20 
455 
1,283 
261 
236 

264 
690 

Connecticut   and   western 
Massachusetts 

Cumberland    Valley    (Ken- 
tucky) 

East  Georgia  and  South  Caro- 
lina               -.--  -  

1 

1 

2 
1 

5,  300 
4,256 

838 
3,300 

Eastern  Michigan 

Eastern  North  Carolina 

Hoosick  Valley    .,. 

International 

Louisiana 

Maine 

35 
22 
1 
1 
3 

4 
8 
23 
6 
3 

5 

7 

159,  200 
270,  000 
(') 
(0 
30,  000 

1,950 
16,  100 
129,500 
45,  600 
3,800 

51,000 
92,300 

3 

5 

9,  500 
27,  709 

Massachusetts  .  ~- 

Michigan 

Middl0  Georgia 

Minnesota 

1 

850 

Mississippi 

Missouri  Valley 

2 
4 

1,500 
3,675 

New  Hampshire  

NGW  York  and  Ontario 

Northeastern  Alabama 

Northern  California 

2 
3 

2,300 
27,  600 

Northern  Illinois  

Northern  Indiana  and  south- 
ern Michigan 

Northwestern  Pennsylvania.  _. 
Ohio  

3 

10 

5 
19 

5 
6 

21 
2 
1 

5 
10 

1 
3 
21 

4 
7 
10 

4,500 
34,  230 

9,500 
71,  550 

65,  737 
116,  000 

56,425 

8 

5,250 
12,800 

0) 
11,250 
83,  000 

46,  500 
18,  500 
35,  900 

27,250 

3 

10 

5 

17 

5 
6 

17 
2 
1 

6 
8 

125 
478 

211 
1,  193 

505 
677 

940 
130 
203 

339 

471 

1 

2 
3 

1 
2 

2 

5,000 

1,  052 
3,050 

500 
6,700 

1,796 

Oklahoma 

Piedmont..         *_    .  .. 

Khode    Island    and    eastern 
Connecticut 

Southern  California  

Southern  Georgia  and  Florida- 
Southern  Illinois 

Southern  Indiana 

Southwestern    Virginia    and 
southern  Virginia 

Virginia  

West  Tennessee,  north  Mis- 
sissippi, and  eastern  Arkansas. 
West  Texas 

2 

1 

2 

950 
8,450 

2,850 

4 
20 

4 

7 
7 

329 
1,282 

513 
387 
494 

West  Virginia 

West  Washington  and  British 
Columbia  

Willamette  Valley 

Wisconsin 

3 

5,112 

Combinations  

1  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated 
of  any  individual  church. 


"Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 


ADVENT    CHRISTIAN    CHURCH  15 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  disappointment  felt  by  the  Adventists  at  the  passing  of  October  22,  1844, 
the  date  set  by  S.  S.  Snow  for  the  second  advent  of  Christ,  resulted  in  confusion  and 
much  discussion  as  to  the  accuracy  of  the  calculations.  In  1852,  Jonathan  Cum- 
mings,  F.  H.  Berick,  and  several  others,  mostly  young  men  who  had  recently 
joined  the  Advent  movement,  began  to  teach  that  the  Lord  had  bestowed  upon 
them  the  "high  and  distinguishing  gift  of  understanding  the  time"  for  the  coming 
of  Christ,  which  they  claimed  would  be  in  the  autumn  of  1853  or  the  spring  of 
1854.  Inasmuch  as  this  view  was  not  acceptable  to  the  main  body  of  Adventists, 
a  paper  was  started  in  Lowell,  Mass.,  and  named  The  World's  Crisis,  for  the 
advocacy  of  this  1854-time  argument.  This  caused  a  division  among  the  Advent- 
ists. When  1854  passed  without  bringing  the  end  of  the  age  the  men  who  had 
led  the  movement  admitted  their  mistake,  and  it  was  hoped  that  their  followers 
would  rejoin  the  original  body. 

By  this  time,  however,  a  well-marked  difference  of  opinion  had  developed 
among  the  Adventists  in  reference  to  the  immortality  of  the  soul.  The  followers 
of  Mr.  Cummings  had  for  the  most  part  accepted  the  doctrine  that  man  is  by 
nature  wholly  mortal  and  is  unconscious  in  death,  and  that  immortality  is  not 
inherent  in  mankind,  but  is  the  gift  of  God  to  be  bestowed  in  the  resurrection  on 
those  only  who  have  been  true  followers  of  Christ.  The  main  body  of  Adventists, 
on  the  other  hand,  accepted,  in  general,  the  doctrine  of  the  conscious  state  of  the 
dead  and  the  eternal  suffering  of  the  wicked.  Owing  largely  to  this  difference, 
which  they  considered  to  be  upon  a  vital  point,  when  a  general  conference  met 
at  Boston,  June  5,  1855,  the  followers  of  Mr.  Cummings  did  not  unite  in  it,  but 
held  a  conference  of  their  own  on  the  same  day.  From  this  time  the  separation 
between  the  two  bodies  was  definitely  recognized.  Those  who  had  separated 
from  the  main  body  organized  the  Advent  Christian  Association  at  Worcester, 
Mass.,  November  6,  1861,  and  have  since  borne  the  name  "Advent  Christian 
Church/'  This  branch  of  the  Adventists  now  holds  simply  to  the  general  im- 
minence of  Christ's  return,  but  takes  the  position  that  no  man  knoweth  the 
day  nor  the  hour  wherein  the  Son  of  Man  cometh."  They  also  emphasize  that 
side  of  their  faith  which  deals  with  the  nature  of  man. 

DOCTRINE 

The  Declaration  of  Principles  held  by  this  church,  as  unanimously  approved 
by  the  Advent  Christian  Association  and  General  Conference  of  America,  in 
1900,  emphasizes  the  following  points: 

1.  The  Bible  is  the  Word  of  God,  containing  a  revelation  given  to  man  under 
divine  supervision  and  providence;  its  historical  statements  are  correct,  and  it  is 
the  only  divine  standard  of  faith  and  practice. 

2.  As  revealed  in  the  Bible,  (a)  there  is  one  God,  the  Father,  Creator  of  all 
things;  (6)  Jesus  Christ,  the  only  begotten  Son  of  God,  came  into  the  world,  died 
for  man's  sins,  was  raised  for  his  justification,  ascended  into  heaven  as  the  High 
Priest  and  Mediator,  and  will  come  again  to  judge  the  living  and  the  dead,  and 
reign  forever  and  ever;  (c)  the  Holy  Spirit,  the  Comforter,  sent  from  God  to 
convince  the  world  of  sin,  of  righteousness,  and  of  judgment,  sanctifies  man  and 
seals  him  unto  the  day  of  redemption. 

3.  Man  was  created  for  immortality,  but  through  sin  has  forfeited  his  divine 
birthright,  and  only  through  faith  in  Christ  can  become  partaker  of  the  divine 
nature  and  live  forever.  ' 

4.  Death  is,  to  all  persons,  righteous  and  wicked,  a  condition  of  unconscious- 
ness, to  remain  unchanged  until  the  resurrection  at  Christ's  second  coming,  when 
the  righteous  will  receive  everlasting  life,  while  the  wicked  will  be  "punished  with 
everlasting  destruction,"  suffering  complete  extinction  of  being. 

5.  Salvation  is  free  to  all  who  in  this  life  and  age  accept  the  conditions,  all 
hope  of  future  probation  or  universal  salvation  being  excluded. 

6.  Jesus  Christ,  according  to  His  promise,  will,  "in  like  manner"  as  He^went 
into  heaven,  come  again  to  this  earth  to  reign  forever,  and  this  coming  is  the 
hope  of  the  church,  inasmuch  as  upon  it  depend  the  reward  of  the  righteous,  the 
abolition  of  sin,  and  the  renewal  of  the  earth  to  become  the  eternal  home  of  the 
redeemed. 

i  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Keport  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  Rev.  C.  H.  Hewitt,  secretary  of  the  Advent  Christian  General  Conference 
of  America,  Aurora,  111.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


16  CENSUS   OF  KELIGIOTTS  BODIES,    1936 

7.  Bible  prophecy  indicates  the  approximate  time  of  Christ's  return,  and  the 
great  duty  of  the  hour  is  the  proclamation  of  this  soon-coming  redemption. 

8.  The  church,  an  institution  of  divine  origin,  includes  all  Christians  of  what- 
ever name,  but  the  local  organization  should  be  independent  of  outside  control, 
subject  to  no  dictation  of  priest,  bishop,  or  pope,  although  recognizing  true 
fellowship  and  unity  of  action. 

9.  The  only  ordinances  recognized  are  baptism  and  the  Lord's  Supper,  im- 
mersion being  considered  the  only  true  baptism,    Admission  to  the  church  is  by 
vote  of  the  majority  after  baptism  arid  profession  of  faith.    Open  communion  is 
practiced  and  the  invitation  to  the  Lord's  Supper  is  general,  participation  being 
left  to  the  individual, 

10.  The  first  day  of  the  week,  set  apart  by  the  early  church  in  commemoration 
of  the  resurrection,  is  held  to  be  the  proper  Christian  Sabbath,  to  be  observed  as 
a  day  of  rest  and  religious  worship. 

11.  War  as  a  means  of  settling  international  disputes  is  held  to  be  contrary  to 
the  spirit  and  teachings  of  Christ,  contrary  to  the  spirit  of  true  brotherhood,  and 
inimical  to  the  welfare  of  humanity.    Christians  are  justified  in  refusing  to  bear 
arms  for  conscience'  sake. 

ORGANIZATION 

In  accordance  with  the  principles  outlined,  the  Advent  Christian  Church  is 
congregational  in  church  government,  each  church  being  absolutely  independent 
in  its  own  management.  Local  elders  (not  ordained)  and  deacons  are  elected 
annually,  as  are  the  various  officials  and  committees.  The  elders  have  charge 
of  the  religious  services  when  the  church  has  no  pastor,  and  the  deacons  care  for 
the  poor  and  serve  as  bearers  at  the  communion  service,  which  is  usually  held  each 
month.  Women  equally  with  men  are  eligible  to  office. 

For  fellowship  and  the  better  conduct  of  such  work  as  belongs  to  them  in  com- 
mon, the  churches  are  associated  in  annual  conferences,  which  are  grouped  in 
five  districts,  while  the  Advent  Christian  General  Conference  represents  the 
entire  denomination.  According  to  the  constitution  adopted  at  Boston,  May  20, 
1915,  the  object  of  this  conference  is:  To  advance  the  interests  of  and  unify  the 
Advent  Christian  people  in  their  various  branches  of  work;  hold  biennial  sessions 
for  the  transaction  of  business  and  the  discussion  of  questions  of  interest  to  the 
churches;  devise  the  best  methods  for  the  conduct  of  the  finances  of  the  churches 
and  the  cooperating  societies;  cooperate  with  the  churches  in  securing  pastors 
and  in  utilizing  the  services  of  worthy  men;  act  as  a  board  of  appeal;  establish  a 
bureau  of  statistics;  publish  a  biennial  manual;  and  deal  with  any  matters  affecting 
the  welfare  of  the  churches. 

The  membership  of  the  General  Conference  consists  of  delegates  chosen  by 
the  annual  conferences,  one  for  each  conference,  and  one  for  each  400  members 
of  the  conference  churches  above  the  first  400,  together  with  the  officers  and  one 
delegate  from  each  cooperating  society. 

The  organization  of  the  General  Conference  as  of  1936  includes  as  officers  a 
president,  five  vice  presidents  (who  serve  as  regional  superintendents  of  con- 
ference work  in  the  five  districts),  a  secretary,  who  serves  as  the  executive  of 
the  conference,  and  a  treasurer.  In  each  of  the  five  regions  there  is  a  board  of 
councilors,  the  vice  president  for  each  region  being  the  chairman  of  the  regional 
board.  The  national  officers  named  above  constitute  an  executive  committee 
which  has  full  charge  of  the  General  Conference  activities  between  biennial 
sessions.  The  General  Conference  acts  in  an  advisory  capacity  only,  but  there 
is  a  growing  tendency  to  recognize  its  leadership  in  general  denominational  life. 
The  General  Conference  headquarters  are  in  Boston,  Mass. 

There  is  one  publication  house  located  in  each  of  the  following  cities:  Boston, 
Mass.,  Oakland,  Calif.,  and  Live  Oak,  Fla. 

Ordination  to  the  ministry  rests  with  the  conferences.  It  takes  place  on 
request  of  a  church,  after  examination  of  the  applicant  by  a  committee,  vote  of 
the  conference,  and  the  appointment  of  an  ordaining  committee.  The  minister 
becomes  a  member  of  the  conference  which  ordained  him.  In  the  reception  of 
ministers  from  other  bodies  previous  ordination  is  accepted. 


ADVENT    CHKISTIAKT   CHURCH  17 

WORK 

The  denominational  activities  of  the  Advent  Christian  Church  are  carried  on 
mainly  through  the  American  Advent  Mission  Society,  the  Woman's  Home  and 
Foreign  Mission  Society,  four  publication  societies,  and  regional  organizations. 

The  American  Advent  Mission  Society,  which  does  both  home  and  foreign 
mission  work,  is  incorporated  and  operates  under  the  General  Conference, 
although  it  is  independent  in  its  organization.  Its  officers  are  elected  by  delegates 
from  the  various  churches  and  conferences,  and  its  meetings  are  held  annually. 
The  Woman's  Home  and  Foreign  Mission  Society  is  also  independent  of  the 
General  Conference  in  organization  and  operates  similarly.  This  organization 
is  made  up  of  local  societies  connected  with  the  various  churches.  Its  officers 
are  elected  annually  by  delegates  from  the  local  societies.  The  foreign  program 
of  this  society  is  confined  to  India,  and  its  home  work  is  chiefly  in  the  interest 
of  a  home  for  students  of  the  New  England  School  of  Theology.  There  is  a  West- 
ern Home  Mission  Board  which  does  about  the  same  work  in  the  Middle  West 
that  the  American  Advent  Mission  Society  does  in  the  East,  except  that  its 
sphere  is  confined  to  home  missions.  There  is  also  a  woman's  society  called  the 
Helper's  Union  and  Central  Mission  Branch,  doing  both  home  and  foreign  mission 
work.  The  number  of  missionaries  and  evangelists  employed  during  the  year  was 
30  and  the  number  of  churches  aided,  50.  Contributions  of  more  than  $75,000 
were  received.  A  large  part  of  the  home  missionary  and  philanthropic  work 
is  done  by  the  State  conferences. 

In  the  foreign  field,  9  stations  are  occupied,  in  addition  to  26  out-stations,  in 
India,  China,  and  Japan.  The  report  for  1936  shows  11  American  missionaries, 
with  a  force  of  well  over  100  native  evangelists,  teachers,  and  colporteurs  con- 
stantly employed  with  the  missionaries  at  the  various  stations;  23  churches  with 
2,273  members;  2  training  schools,  an  industrial  school,  2  secondary  schools,  17 
elementary  schools,  and  several  night  schools  in  India,  besides  an  academy,  a 
girls'  school,  and  several  elementary  schools  in  China;  a  hospital,  a  nursing  home, 
5  dispensaries  and  rural  clinics,  and  3  orphanages.  The  value  of  property  on 
the  foreign  field  is  estimated  at  $133,361. 

Two  educational  institutions,  for  which  over  $10,000  in  addition  to  proceeds 
from  endowment  and  personal  gifts  were  contributed  in  1936,  are  carried  on 
under  their  auspices  in  the  United  States.  They  include  a  college  at  Aurora,  111., 
and  a  theological  school  at  Boston.  The  two  institutions  reported  230  students 
and  property  valued  at  $381,761,  including  an  endowment  of  over  $300,000, 
which  it  is  hoped  will  be  increased  to  $500,000.  The  denomination  maintains  one 
orphanage  in  the  South,  and,  in  connection  with  it,  a  home  for  the  aged;  there 
is  also  a  home  for  the  aged  in  New  England.  The  southern  property,  at  Bowling 
Park,  Fla.,  consisting  of  two  new  fireproof  buildings  and  several  frame  buildings, 
is  valued  at  $75,000,  and  $10,000  was  contributed  for  its  support  in  1936.  The 
New  England  property  at  South  Vernon,  Mass.,  consists  of  a  commodious  build- 
ing of  27  rooms  and  about  3  acres  of  land,  valued  at  about  $10,000. 

The  young  people  of  the  denomination  are  organized  in  a  Young  People's 
Loyal  Workers  Society,  which  in  1936  included  135  branches,  with  a  membership 
of  3,352. 


SEVENTH-DAY  ADVENTIST  DENOMINATION 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Seventh-day  Adventist  Denomination  for  the 
year  1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these 
figures  between  urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have 
been  baptized,  by  immersion,  and  received  into  full  membership  in  the  local 
churches  upon  profession  of  faith. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY   OF  STATISTICS  FOR   CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 

territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  * 

Urban 

Rural 

Ch.urch.es  (local  organizations),  number  ._-_ 

2,054 

133.  254 
65 

43,  185 
86,  838 
3,231 
49.7 

3,  596 
122,  368 

7,290 
2.9 

1,451 
1,362 
$6,  690,  955 
$0,  463,  299 
$227,  656 
$4,  913 
195 
$487,404 
989 

49 
35 

$117,  089 

1,973 
$6,  196,  143 
$16,  652 
$181,752 
$136,  302 

$86,  534 

$285,  876 
$100,  591 
$202,  453 
$580,  037 
$4,427,039 
$178,  927 
$3,  140 

1,153 

90,417 
84 

29,  065 
64,  420 
2,932 
45.1 

2,691 
87,  555 
6,171 
3.0 

832 
779 
$5,  646,  358 
$5,487,117 
$159,  241 
$7,  248 
162 
$470,  966 
521 

37 
25 
$107,  089 

1,109 
$4,  814,  000 
$11,  963 
$146,  773 
$106,  635 

$76,  119 

$246,  747 
$80,  186 
$155,  539 
$457,  446 
$3,  394,  818 
$137,  774 
$4,  341 

001 

36,  837 
41 

14,  120 
22,418 
299 
63.0 

005 
34,  813 
1,119 
2.5 

619 

583 
$1,044,597 
$976.  182 
$68,  415 
$1,  792 
33 
$16,  438 
468 

12 
10 
$10,  000 

864 
$1,382,143 
$4,  089 
$34,  979 
$29,  667 

$10,  415 

$39,  129 
$20,405 
$46,  914 
$122,  591 
$1,032,201 
$41,  153 
$1,  600 

56.1 

72.4 

43.9 

27.  6 

Members  ,  number  

Average  membership  per  church,  „  .  

Membership  by  sex: 
Malc__    *,  _,  -  ,,__„ 

67,3 
74.2 
90.7 

32.7 
25.  8 
9.3 

Female  -  

Sex  not  reported  ,.  __  -.  

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  ago: 
Under  13  years 

74.8 
71.6 
84.7 

25.2 
28.4 
15.3 

13  years  and  over  

Age  not  reported  

Percent  under  13  years  2 

Church  edifices,  number  ._ 

57.3 
57,2 
84.4 
84.9 
69.9 

42.7 
42.8 
15.  6 
15.1 
30.1 

Value  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported 

Constructed  prior  to  1036 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  193G- 
Aver&Eje  value  per  church 

Debt  —  n  umber  reporting..    _    _    __ 

83.6 
96.  6 

52.  7 

16.4 
3.4 
47.3 

Amount  reported  «„    _      ..>. 

Number  reporting  "no  debt"  _    

Parsonages,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  

01.  5 

56.  2 
77.7 
71.8 
80.8 
78.2 

88.0 

86.3 
79.7 
76.8 
78.9 
76.7 
77.0 

8.5 

43,8 
22.3 
28,2 
19.2 
21.8 

12.0 

13.7 
20.3 
23.2 
21.1 
23.3 
23.0 

Expenditures: 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Amount  reported 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries  ,  

Repairs  and  improvements  

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.  _,  . 
Home  missions 

Foreign  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.. 
All  other  purposes  

Average  expenditure  per  church.-  

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

3  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

18 


SEVENTH-DAY  ADVENIIST  DENOMINATION 


19 


TABLE  1. — SUMMARY   OF   STATISTICS   FOR   CHURCHES  IN   URBAN   AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Sabbath  scliools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  „_ 

1,465 
19,  823 
97,062 

9 

71 
307 

122 
612 

2,787 

569 
3,264 
16,  438 

845 
13,  078 
67,  920 

4 
33 
146 

84 
451 
2,150 

379 
2,253 
11,  172 

620 
6,745 
29,  142 

5 
38 
161 

38 
161 
637 

190 
1,011 
5,266 

57.7 
66.0 
70.0 

42.3 
34.0 
30.0 

Officers  and  teachers  . 

Scholars  _  . 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars  

47.6 

68.9 
73.7 
77.1 

66.6 
69.0 
68.0 

52.4 

31.1 
26.3 
22.9 

33.4 
31.0 
32.0 

Weekday  religious  scliools  : 

Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers    _ 

Scholars  .. 

Parochial  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

*  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Seventh-day  Adventist 
Denomination  for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

19S6 

1916 

1906 

Ch.Tirch.es  (local  orcaiiiftatiQTis),  number     ,        -,  ,   .,„,-.. 

2,054 

73 
3.7 

133,  254 

22,  256 
20.1 
65 

1,451 
1,362 
$6,  690,  955 
$4,  913 
195 
$487,  404 

40 
35 

$117,  089 

1,973 
$6,  196,  143 
$16,  652 
$181,  752 
$136,  302 
$86,  534 
$285,  876 
$100,  591 
$202,  453 
$580,  037 
$4,  427,  019 
$178,  927 

1,981 

-30 
1.5 

2,011 

127 
6.7 

79,  355 

17,  144 
27.6 
39 

1,231 

1,231 
$2,  568,  495 
$2,  087 
240 
$209,  154 

1,884 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 
Number                                  -  - 

Percent                                  -  -  -      -         -«- 

Members,  number           -  -  .  , 

110,  998 

31,  643 
39.9 
56 

1,399 
1,363 
$8,  477,  999 
$6,  220 
261 
$908,  352 

62,211 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
Number              -            

Percent 

Average  membership  per  church  «  

33 

981 

981 
$1,  454,  087 
$1,  482 
121 
$77,  984 

Value—number  reporting        

Amount  reported            

Average  value  per  church      

"Debt  —  number  reporting          

Amount  reported        --  ,  -  

Value    number  reporting 

36 

$182,  600 

1,849 
$6,  998,  988 

$1,  291,  018 

l$5,  647,  948 

$60,  022 
$3,  785 

1,383 
14,972 
81,  067 

16 
$20,450 

1,737 

$1,  887,  772 

$476,  524 
$1,411,248 

14 
$14,  165 

Amount  reported       <  

Expenditures  : 

oflurcnes  ™t  ori    g,          o 

Pastors'  salaries.  ,  -  

All  other  salaries  -  

Kepairs  and  improvements  
Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  — 
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest.  _. 
Local  relief  and  chanty,  Red  Cross,  etc   _  - 

Home  missions                                  -  ---  ----- 

Foreign  missions                                   _____  ___ 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  

All  other  purposes                             -    __-_«-  _ 

Not  classified  

Average  expenditure  per  church  

Sabbath  schools  : 

Churches  reporting  number            --    ------------ 

$3,140 

1,465 
19,  823 
97,  062 

$1,  087 

1,803 
15,  298 
74,863 

1,656 
11,  033 
50,  225 

Officers  and  teachers  -  ,  

i  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 
275318 — 41 3 


20 


CENSUS   OF   KELIGIOUS  BODIES,    1936 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Seventh-day 
Adventist  Denomination  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the 
number  and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in 
urban  or  rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sabbath 
schools.  Table  4  gives  for  each  State  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches 
for  the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936 
classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5 
shows  the  value  of  churches  and  parsonages  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church 
edifices  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing 
separately  current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  conference  in  the  Seventh- 
day  Adventist  Denomination,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936 
shown  by  States  in  the  preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  member- 
ship, value  and  debt  on  church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sabbath  schools. 

TABLE  3. — NTJMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SABBATH  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SABBATH 
SCHOOLS 

3 

e 

a 

1 
P 

-3 
1 

•a 

I 

§ 

•8 

p 

rt 

£ 

r-2 

£ 

* 

i! 

%* 
CQ 

Males  per  100 
females 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Officers  and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States  

2,054 

1.158 

901 

133,254 

96,417 

36,837 

43,  185 

86,  838 

3,231 

49.7 

1,465 

19,  823 

97,062 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Mains 

23 

11 

16 
33 
8 

17 

76 
35 

77 

66 
54 
68 
150 
81 

65 
58 
41 
45 
28 
48 
48 

5 

24 
4 
33 
12 
31 
16 
23 
60 

21 
44 
21 
22 

5 
7 
6 
28 
5 
14 

54 
32 
50 

46 
35 
52 
63 
37 

34 
33 
20 
9 
11 
21 
26 

3 
13 
4 

17 
10 
19 
11 
17 
44 

12 
25 
12 
14 

18 
4 
10 
5 
3 
3 

22 
3 

27 

20 
19 
16 

87 
44 

31 
25 
21 
36 
17 
27 
22 

2 
11 

"~16 
2 
12 
5 
6 
16 

9 
19 
9 

8 

740 
318 
384 
2,801 
406 
592 

5,620 
1,690 
4,058 

4,222 
3,  026 
4,666 
9,395 
3,040 

4,124 
2,434 
2,  529 
1,741 
1,178 
3,102 
2,312 

242 
2,723 
887 
1,631 
590 
1,239 
429 
1,335 
4,023 

1,075 
3,040 
926 

777 

292 
201 
170 
2,209 
347 
565 

4,961 
1,618 
3,354 

3,256 
2,592 
4,017 
6,170 
1,490 

3,426 
1,845 
1,915 
348 
626 
2,486 
1,539 

182 
2,299 
887 
1,029 
635 
769 
334 
1,196 
3,474 

853 
1,881 
728 
518 

448 
117 
214 
592 
59 
27 

659 
72 

704 

966 
434 
649 
3,225 
1,550 

698 
589 
614 
1,393 
652 
616 
773 

60 
424 

""602 
65 
470 
95 
139 
549 

222 
1,169 
198 
259 

225 
92 
137 
854 
109 
174 

1,835 
558 
1,314 

1,303 
831 
1,317 
3,034 
1,067 

1,445 
776 
728 
708 
424 
734 
748 

82 
971 
174 
484 
134 
368 
124 
373 
1,100 

267 
907 
278 
235 

515 
226 
247 
1,947 
297 
383 

3,785 
1,132 
2,744 

2,919 
2,195 
3,176 
6,337 
1,973 

2,679 
1,648 
1,801 
1,033 
754 
1,538 
1,  564 

160 
1,752 
508 
1,147 
366 
871 
305 
944 
2,788 

759 
1,558 
648 
542 

"""35 

43.7 
40  7 
55.5 
43.9 
36.7 
45.4 

48,5 
49.3 
47.9 

44.6 
37,9 
41.5 
47.9 
54.1 

53.9 
47.1 
40.4 
68.5 
56.2 
47.7 
47.8 

51.3 
55.4 
34.3 
42.2 
36.6 
42.3 
40.7 
39.5 
41.6 

35.2 
58.2 
42.9 
43.4 

18 
7 
10 
19 
6 
13 

50 
24 
59 

42 
39 
44 
105 
62 

38 
39 
31 
28 
21 
31 
30 

4 
18 
2 
29 
9 
23 
8 
19 
47 

15 
37 
16 
16 

143 
76 
01 
334 
71 
107 

721 
287 
692 

550 
500 
706 
1,525 
536 

406 
441 
364 
274 
237 
324 
340 

51 
314 
84 
312 
92 
217 
47 
232 
658 

197 
497 
168 
178 

561 
203 
247 
1,  850 
362 
466 

3,766 
1,290 
3,297 

3,070 
2,210 
3,261 
7,607 
2,116 

1,713 
1,786 
1,976 
1,367 
1,128 
1,  295 
1,680 

211 
2,191 
350 
1,615 
395 
996 
195 
1,086 
3,505 

781 
2,516 
761 
721 

New  Hampshire  
Vermont     .  -~ 

Massachusetts  

Rhode  Island.  _.  

Connecticut          -  - 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 

New  York    

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania   

""l73 
24 

"""16 
""830 

""205 
"""90 

"""18 
75 

49 

575 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

Ohio         

Indiana  . 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin    .    _  -  - 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa             

Missouri            

North  Dakota  

South  Dakota    ..  -_ 

Nebraska  

Kansas-.-.  ..- 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware    

Maryland 

District  of  Columbia. 
Virginia             -    .. 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  
South  Carolina 

Georgia.  

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Kentucky      .  

Tennessee  

Alabama  ...»  

Mississiooi  

SEVENTH-DAY   ADVENTIST   DENOMINATION 


21 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SABBATH  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 — 
Continued 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBEE  OP 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SABBATH 
SCHOOLS 

s 
& 

fl 

1 

b 

(§ 

5 
3 
22 

22 

12 
18 
7 
27 
8 
4 
1 
1 

69 
46 
81 

*e3 
"o 
& 

fS 

3 
3 

•3 

% 

48 

s 

2 

fs 

02 

Males  per  100 
females 

Churches  re- 
porting 

|e 

Q    S? 

0 

Scholars 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

23 
14 
41 
67 

24 
31 
11 
49 
14 
13 
7 
4 

108 
76 
208 

18 
11 
19 

45 

12 
13 
4 
22 
6 
9 
6 
3 

39 
30 
127 

1,022 
790 
2,099 
4,102 

917 
1,875 
373 
2,754 
484 
1,002 
279 
141 

7,808 
6,569 

25,  744 

834 
742 
1,228 
2,737 

492 
1,287 
208 
1,916 
246 
899 
262 
132 

4,314 
4,310 
18,  698 

188 
48 
871 
1,365 

425 
588 
165 
838 
238 
103 
17 
9 

3,494 
2.259 
7  046 

325 
191 
664 
1,345 

300 
602 
123 
925 
187 
372 
81 
45 

2,812 
2,317 
8,926 

697 
599 
1,435 

2,757 

563 
1,048 
250 
1,765 
297 
630 
198 
96 

4,846 
4,136 
16,  280 



46.6 
31  9 
46.3 

48  8 

53  3 
57.4 
49.2 
52.4 
63.0 
59.0 
40  9 
C1) 

58.0 
56,0 
54  8 

19 
12 
26 
52 

17 
22 
10 
35 
10 
8 
4 
3 

84 
57 

147 

243 
137 
328 
669 

179 
281 
92 
442 
140 
131 
60 
28 

1,156 
923 
3,272 

879 
593 
1,453 
2,431 

772 
1,212 
337 
2,243 
327 
702 
156 
143 

5,594 
4,952 
18,  714 

Louisiana       

Oklahoma 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana 

54 
225 

"~64 

150 
116 
538 

Idaho 

Wyoming  —  

Colorado 

New  Mexico  

Arizona    

Utah            

Nevada  

PACIFIC: 
Washington         

Oregon 

California      

1  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION   AND 
STATE 

NUMBER  0? 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE, 
1936 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

CO 

7!  m 

<s>  5j 

1" 

§1 

-i 

TH    OJ 

§43 

14 

II 
oS 

£q 
Pn3 

"United  States 

2,054 

1,981 

2,011 

1,884 

133,  254 

110,  998 

79,  355 

82,  211 

3.596 

122,  388 

7,290 

2.9 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
3VJ  aine                  -  - 

23 
11 
16 
33 
8 
17 

76 
35 

77 

66 
54 
68 
150 
81 

65 

58 
41 
45 
28 
48 
48 

16 
7 
13 
36 
6 
13 

81 
42 
73 

66 
55 
60 
138 
79 

66 
79 
37 
52 
30 
51 
61 

18 
8 
16 
37 
5 
11 

73 
29 
75 

62 
60 
64 
180 
91 

65 
97 
54 
40 
37 
54 
75 

22 
6 
19 
26 
9 
12 

99 
18 
66 

84 
72 
56 
174 
105 

77 
121 
55 
27 
40 
64 
83 

740 
318 
384 
2,801 
406 
592 

5,620 
1,690 
4,058 

4,222 
3,026 
4,666 
9,395 
3,040 

4,124 
2,434 

2,529 
1,741 
1,178 
3,102 
2,312 

532 
177 
352 
2,146 
336 
489 

5,271 
1,721 
4,794 

3,467 
2,421 
4,170 
7,955 
3,185 

3,237 
2,651 
2,326 
2,017 
1,439 
2,635 
2,259 

586 
164 
399 
1,655 
182 
419 

3,546 
1,181 
2,704 

2,490 
1,800 
2,440 
6,266 

2,781 

2,300 
2,851 
1,830 
1,322 
1,046 
2,443 
2,504 

527 
115 
458 
926 
179 
269 

2,614 
451 
2,000 

2,334 
2,029 
1,906 
7,042 
3,194 

2,103 
3,097 
1,805 
868 
1,042 
2,415 
2,394 

1 
9 

"""II 
2 
18 

74 
13 
108 

142 
77 
171 
173 
36 

23 
35 
99 
15 
41 
102 
206 

714 
309 
364 
2,594 
369 
561 

5,546 
1,677 
3,950 

4,080 
2,613 
4,213 
7,954 
2,913 

3,641 
2,379 
2,430 
1,72,6 
1,137 
2,135 
2,043 

25 

.1 
2.8 
._... 

.5 
3.1 

1.3 
.8 
2.7 

3.4 
2.9 
3.9 
2.1 
1.2 

.6 
1.4 
3.9 
.9 
3.5 
4.6 
9.2 

New  Hampshire 

Vermont        _  _  

20 
196 
35 
13 

"336 

282 
1,268 
91 

460 
20 

""§65 
63 

M  assachusetts 

Rhode  Island 

Connecticut  _.    

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  

New  Jersey    

Pennsy  1  vania 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio                

Indiana 

Illinois  _.    «        

Michigan 

W  isconsin 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
M  innesota 

Iowa 

M  issouri                  

North  Dakota 

South  Dakota  

Nebraska            

Kansas  _  

'Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


22                                CENSUS    OF   KELIGIOCJS   BODIES,    1936 

TABLE  4.  —  NUMBER  ANJ>  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES-  —  Continued 

GEOGEAPHIC      DIVISION      AND 
STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHUKCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE, 
1930 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

1930 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Under  13 
years 

13  years 
and  over 

"0*0 
*$ 

SS, 

•^  s 

Percent 
under  13  J 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware  .    

5 

24 
4 
33 
12 
31 
16 
23 
60 

21 
44 
21 
22 

23 
14 
41 
67 

24 
31 
11 
49 
14 
13 
7 
4 

108 
76 
208 

6 
20 
4 
29 
10 
33 
17 
19 
44 

20 
38 
20 
18 

19 
10 

47 
52 

25 
32 
8 
63 
9 
9 
6 
2 

93 
69 
198 

5 
17 
6 
29 
10 
26 
19 
21 
35 

15 
37 
22 
18 

20 
15 
55 
40 

18 
30 
9 
65 
12 
14 
4 
3 

85 
67 
163 

3 

11 
3 
25 
19 
13 
13 
8 
17 

19 
29 
15 
20 

22 

19 
66 
29 

24 
12 
4 
49 
6 
9 
8 
2 

60 
50 
94 

242 
2,  723 
887 
1,631 
590 
1,239 
429 
1,335 
4,023 

1,075 
3,040 
928 

777 

1,022 
790 
2,099 
4,102 

917 
1,875 
373 
2,  754 
484 
1,002 
279 
141 

7,808 
6,569 
25,  744 

270 
1,598 
1,441 
941 
492 
1,189 
423 
1,056 
2,630 

1,013 
2,082 
740 
568 

706 
536 
2,  642 
3,011 

872 
1,186 
310 
3,  309 
221 
579 
190 
125 

6,063 
4,936 
18,  429 

189 
897 
1,006 
736 
283 
704 
485 
710 
1,259 

382 

1,414 
609 
398 

601 

481 
2,258 
1,801 

701 
1,065 
224 
2,  702 
323 
441 
175 
149 

3,  944 
3,476 
10,  973 

155 
401 
382 
576 
344 
264 
201 
205 
411 

343 
1,  101 
315 
380 

544 
502 
1,  967 
1,414 

565 
430 
76 
2,311 
218 
214 
216 
76 

2,  592 
1,844 
6,  396 

2 

58 
14 
61 
10 
8 
7 
40 
129 

26 
65 
53 
14 

27 
35 
55 
126 

24 
32 
7 
55 
9 
42 
9 
1 

208 
160 
963 

240 
2,665 
668 
1,  555 
490 
1,231 
407 
1,277 
3,791 

1,000 
2,400 
861 
686 

995 
755 
2,044 
3,752 

823 
I,  534 
366 
2,  546 
475 
938 
270 
140 

7,  443 
5,829 
23,  839 

"205 
15 
90 
—  ... 

18 
103 

49 
575 

12 

77 

""224 

70 
309 

0.8 
2.1 
2.1 
3.8 
2.0 
.6 
1.7 
3.0 
3.3 

2  5 

2  0 
5.8 
2.0 

2.6 
4.4 
2.6 
3.2 

2.8 
2  0 
1.9 
2.1 
1.9 
4.3 
3.2 
.7 

2.7 
2.7 
3.9 

Maryland  

District  of  Columbia  
Virginia  - 

West  Virginia  

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina    -. 

Georgia    ._            

Florida    . 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kientucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama  

Mississippi..     .  _  -    

WEST  SOUTH  CENTEAL: 
Arkansas  . 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma.  

Texas  _  _ 

M  OUNTAIN: 
M  ontana. 

Idaho  . 

"W  yoming 

Colorado 

153 

"""22 

157 
580 
942 

New  Mexico  _  

Arizona  

Utah  

Nevada  

PACIFIC: 
"W  ashington 

Oregon 

California  

1  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  PAKSONAGES   AND  AMOUNT   OF    CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edi- 
fices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

2,054 

1,451 

13 
4 
8 
17 
5 
7 

42 
21 
44 

44 
38 
37 
120 

58 

1,362 

$6,890,955 

195 

$487,  404 

85 

$117,  069 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine 

23 
11 
16 
33 

8 
17 

76 
35 

77 

66 
54 
68 
150 
81 

12 
4 
6 
16 
5 
6 

39 
19 
41 

42 
36 
36 
116 

56 

26,  725 
17,000 
14,000 
123,  600 
62,  800 
36,  300 

686,  863 
126,  500 
453,  600 

286,  345 
206,  200 
182,425 
654,  213 
165,  925 

1 

275 

New  Hampshire  
Vermont 

Massachusetts 

4 
1 
4 

9 

8 
16 

16 
8 
5 
19 
11 

41,  275 
8,161 
9,184 

69,  954 
13,  400 
91,  750 

51,  496 
13,  969 
7,663 
40,  059 
3,501 

Hhode  Island 

Connecticut 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York           .    . 

i 
1 

2 

2 
1 
2 
3 

i;> 

(') 
0) 
10,  100 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

Indiana  

Illinois   —          

Michigan..-       » 

Wisconsin  

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 


SEVENTH-DAY   ADVEWTISX  DENOMINATION 


23 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH 
DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 — Continued 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edi- 
fices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

65 

58 
41 
45 
28 
48 
48 

5 
24 
4 
33 
12 
31 
16 
23 
60 

21 
44 
21 
22 

23 

14 
41 
67 

24 
31 
11 
49 
14 
13 
7 
4 

108 
76 
208 

46 
42 
30 
28 
21 
38 
30 

5 
17 
2 

?i 

21 

14 
18 
47 

16 
27 
10 
20 

19 
8 
31 
50 

19 
20 
8 
35 
10 
11 
4 
3 

84 
59 
163 

44 
38 
28 
26 
20 
37 
27 

5 
15 
1 
29 
7 
21 
13 
16 
44 

15 
23 
9 
19 

19 
7 
30 

44 

18 
16 
8 
32 
10 
10 
4 
3 

80 
56 
154 

$161,  870 
104,  775 
143,  100 
82,  150 
42,  250 
116,  254 
94,  850 

34,  300 
}z  114,  600 

76,  950 
35,  600 
59,  200 
32,  850 
83,  500 
245,  820 

78,400 
97,450 
41,  950 
29,  950 

27,  950 
15,  600 
74,  800 
132,  350 

41,  050 
47,  336 
17,  675 
96,  350 
16,  015 
44,  400 
29,  000 
7,500 

251,950 
178,  685 
991,  979 

6 
3 
5 
4 

$5,  203 
2,150 
16,  765 
1,530 

1 
1 
2 

0) 
(l) 
0) 

Iowa  

Missouri 

North  Dakota 

South  Dakota. 

Nebraska 

I 
2 

3,000 
8,100 

3 

$7,  500 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC. 
Dclawaro 

Maryland, 

/            6 
I            1 
3 
2 
3 
4 
1 
5 

1 
1 

}*24,992 

2,525 
800 
2,956 
2,150 
200 
17,  733 

6,000 
564 

District  of  Columbia.. 
Virginia 

(             I 
1 

8 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina 

1 

0) 

South  Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida      

1 
1 

(0 
(0 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

2 
3 

240 
2,658 

1 

(') 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana, 

Oklahoma       _      

9 

4 

2 
3 

7,443 
2,300 

282 
1,945 

2 
2 

C1) 
0) 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 
M!ontana 

Idaho         

1 

(0 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

1 
1 

4,500 
192 

New  IVtexico 

Utah 

1 

G) 

Nevada 

PACIFIC: 
Washington  

6 
8 
6 

4,975 
10,  432 
7,082 

2 

(0 

Oregon 

California 

2 

0) 

99,489 

Combinations 

*  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 

«  Amount  for  District  of  Columbia  combined  with  figures  for  Maryland,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


24 


CENSUS  OF  RELIGIOUS  BODIES,   1936 
TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Repairs 
and 
improve- 
ments 

United  States           

2,054 

23 
11 
16 
33 

8 
17 

76 
35 

77 

66 
54 
68 
150 
81 

65 
58 
41 
45 
28 
48 
48 

5 
24 
4 
33 
12 
31 
16 
23 
60 

21 
44 
21 
22 

23 
14 
41 
67 

24 
31 
11 
49 
14 
13 
7 
4 

108 
76 
208 

1,973 

22 
11 
16 
32 
8 
15 

72 
34 

75 

63 
53 
66 
142 

78 

63 
55 
38 
43 
27 
45 
47 

5 
23 
4 
32 
10 
30 
14 
22 
57 

19 
40 
19 
22 

21 
12 

39 
65 

23 
30 
10 
46 
14 
13 
7 
4 

108 
75 
204 

$6,  196,  143 

36,  610 
19,360 
16,  552 
189,  782 
34,  210 
30,  726 

380,  628 
121,  492 
246,  117 

205,  576 
162,  307 
192,058 
384,  300 
105,769 

156,636 
87,  403 
92,  753 
39,  973 
42,851 
98,475 
75,954 

18,  725 
171,  145 
32,010 
80,  718 
24,  295 
46,  362 
14,027 
57,044 
161,  720 

46,  492 
121,986 
38,822 
35,  517 

27,  596 
25,  649 
72,241 
126,888 

42,041 
53,  970 
18,  171 
121,093 
21,299 
49,564 
18,229 
5,118 

307,  406 
261,343 
1,  477,  140 

$16,  652 

8181,752 

260 
1,615 

$136,302 

1,750 
2,918 
361 
1,175 
51 
398 

4,  703 
2,206 
11,  152 

6,371 
13,427 
3,  037 
7,411 
3,085 

4,  151 
4,381 
2,027 
1,214 
1,657 
3,721 
1,245 

191 
2,780 
1,003 
2,056 
388 
2,987 
553 
332 
2,768 

318 
1,  631 
766 

477 

1,489 
578 
802 
1,279 

454 
1,080 
500 
1,118 
478 
937 
260 
275 

7,510 
8,731 
18,  090 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine                                    _„„_ 

Now  Hampshire 

"Vermont 

Massachusetts                   -  

4,406 

Rhode  Island                         

C  onnecticut                               

1,571 

13,096 
2,174 
7,019 

5,229 
4,697 
4,  276 
10,  881 
2,637 

3,531 
3,880 
2,  845 
550 
450 
458 
1,458 

495 
2,300 
2,347 
3,654 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

New  Jersey                        -    -  

Pennsylvania                          

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio                                      .  — 

Indiana, 

Illinois  .          ,  .    ._  .  

Michigan                                  

Wisconsin                                 

408 

WEST  NORTH  CENTBAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North  Dakota  

South  Dakota                  

Nebraska 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

585 

Maryland,  ___ 

District  of  Columbia      .          

1,378 

Virginia  -    .  

West  Virginia    » 

North  Carolina 

1,738 
48 
2,934 
6,011 

1.  430 
1,743 
1,383 
638 

2,147 
868 
1,833 
3,285 

2,555 
2.390 
316 
3,313 
4,061 
1,840 

South  Carolina 

Georgia  

1,763 
125 

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Kentucky  

Tennessee  . 

Alabama,  .  

2,160 

Mississippi  _  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana  

Oklahoma  

Texas  

MOUNTAIN: 

Montana  _„ 

Idaho  „ 

Wyoming  „_.  .  „ 

Colorado  

3,553 

New  Mexico  

Arizona  

1,040 

Utah  

Nevada    _ 

500 

5,  065 
8,708 
49,  117 

PACIFIC: 
Washington.  _ 

Oregon  

California  

5,640 

SEVENTH-DAY  ADYE'NTIST  DENOMINATION  25 

TABLE  0. — CHUECH  EXPENDITUEES  BY  STATES,  1936-~-Continued 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION"  AND  STATE 

EXPENDITURES—  continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local  re- 
lief and 

chanty 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  general 
head- 
quarters 

All 
other 

pur- 
poses 

United  States  

$86,  534 
125 

$285,  876 

1,174 
1,145 
362 
7,321 
6,  844 
2,043 

24,839 
6,879 
20,814 

13,914 
10,395 
10,849 
23,831 
5,195 

4,752 
3,596 
4,734 
1,288 
4,158 
5,242 
3,456 

2,027 
6,653 
1,828 
4,206 
962 
884 
768 
2,117 
6,568 

980 
3,317 
965 
671 

777 
961 
4,240 
4,443 

995 
3,297 
313 
4,205 
500 
2,226 
573 
217 

9,238 
6,321 
53,  013 

$100,  591 

========= 

438 
395 
523 
2,329 
327 
542 

5,679 
900 
3,643 

5,034 
981 
4,961 
2,942 
1,363 

2,190 
1,038 
1,44$ 
879 
1.092 
1,  519 
766 

36 
2,424 
155 
1,674 
1,509 
1,043 
345 
763 
2,781 

1,704 
1,516 
344 
355 

481 
700 
1,107 
1,889 

214 
1,035 
126 
1,202 
265 
527 
511 
166 

2,510 
3,883 
32,  342 

$202,453 

580,  037 

4,427,019 

5178,927 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine 

1,830 
95 
1,221 
1,926 
2,716 
247 

12,  722 
8,747 
4,782 

5,514 
6,113 
9,375 
6,936 
5,717 

3,138 
1,739 
5,078 
3,  293 
1,361 
2,555 
1,513 

44 
2,363 
39 
1,147 
783 
734 
217 
1,  056 
4,135 

2,640 
3,325 
206 
1,245 

1,159 
222 
1,737 
6,731 

840 
8,307 
699 
10.  186 
1,384 
1,240 
285 
240 

22,  155 
11,  155 
31,  561 

2,033 
1,063 
3,494 
24,  357 

1,242 
1,323 

36,981 
14,874 
20,  531 

17,  448 
14,035 
17,  360 
38,  738 
15,812 

17,327 
11,  148 
4,009 
2,652 
2,188 
20,  116 
8,999 

442 
9,  547 
4,343 
6,080 
2,811 
4,886 
617 
3,239 
16,691 

4,268 
6,867 
4,425 
947 

2,907 
2,488 
9,391 
18,  459 

4,183 
6,082 
3,  053 
11,  699 
4,433 
2.488 
2,667 
1,850 

38,  248 
29,  054 
102,  142 

27,  612 
12,  078 
9,733 
146,  743 
23,  009 
24,  018 

263,  817 
77,  975 
161,  210 

144,  264 
97,  511 
136,  014 
279,  382 
69,  100 

116,  434 
58,  953 
65,  689 
27,679 
31,  095 
63,  949 
55,  043 

14,  516 
141,  607 
18,  883 
60,  323 
16,  647 
32,  247 
11,  438 
44,  618 
112,  758 

33,  736 

99,  405 
22,888 
29,680 

16,207 
17,  321 
49,417 
85,612 

32,  186 
28,832 
12,  942 
78,468 
9,333 
38,  965 
10,410 
1,870 

206,  825 
176,  097 
1,  132,  480 

1,388 
51 
858 
758 
21 
300 

11,  190 
4,822 
9,128 

3,316 
2,973 
5,509 
6,480 
1,572 

4,423 

1,702 
6,756 
1,934 
850 
915 
424 

389 
2,067 
2,034 
1,138 
827 
1,118 
41 
222 
8,248 

416 
4,022 
5,667 
1,047 

2,384 
2,304 
2,412 
3,737 

266 
1,252 
222 
6,986 
553 
301 
3,523 

New  Hampshire  

Vermont  

Massachusetts 

767 

Rhode  Island  

Connecticut 

284 

7,601 
2,915 
7,838 

4,486 
12,  175 
677 
7,719 
880 

690 
966 
172 
484 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  „  

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania           

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois..       _.          „_    

'  Michigan  .  

Wisconsin 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa  

Missouri  . 

North  Dakota 

South  Dakota  

Nebraska  

Kansas 

3,050 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Delaware  

Maryland  

1,404 

District  of  Columbia  

Virginia  

410 
368 
725 

West  Virginia. 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina  

Georgia--,  

Florida  

1,635 

1,000 
360 
18 

457 

45 
207 
1,302 
1,453 

348 
1,695 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Kentucky  _  __ 

Tennessee    

Alabama.     _                  _  __ 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana                      .  . 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming  

Colorado 

363 
292 

New  Mexico  

Arizona  

Utah  

Nevada 

PACIFIC: 

Washington.    

4,539 
5,662 
13,422 

11,316 
11,  732 
39,  333 

Oregon  ,  

California     ,__ 

26 


CENSUS  01?   RELIGIOUS  BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SABBATH  SCHOOLS,  BY  CONFERENCES, 
1936 


UNION  AND  LOCAL 
CONFERENCE 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 

CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SABBATH 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Scholars 

Total  

2,054 

133,254 

1,362 

$6,  690,  955 

195 

$487,404 

1,973 

$6,  196,  143 

1,465 

97,  062 

Atlantic  Union 

184 
25 
51 
50 
58 

394 
50 

58 
48 
65 
41 
48 
45 
28 
11 

256 
25 
49 
35 
66 
41 
28 
12 

353 

68 
54 
150 
81 

239 
25 
23 
80 
56 
55 

232 
63 
13 

57 

54 
45 

238 
47 
44 
57 
47 
43 

158 
37 
42 
1 
78 

10,861 
2,606 
3,014 
1,442 
3,799 

20,  603 
2,810 
2,434 
2,312 
4,124 
2,529 
3,102 
1,741 
1,178 
373 

16,043 
1,590 
2,939 
1,690 
4,222 
3,874 
1,119 
609 

20,  127 
4,666 
3,026 
9,395 
3,040 

17,  169 
1,498 
875 
7,011 
4,  525 
3,260 

27,  166 
5,883 
499 
5,651 

6,793 
8,340 

12,  844 
1,914 
1,602 
3,835 
2,632 
2,861 

8,441 
1,812 
2,129 
9 
4,491 

88 
13 
26 
22 

27 

261 
33 
38 
27 
44 
28 
37 
26 
20 
8 

159 
19 
28 
19 
42 
31 
13 
7 

244 
36 
36 

116 
56 

170 
13 
18 
58 
41 
40 

171 
48 
7 
44 

39 
33 

160 
31 
33 
41 
29 
26 

109 
26 
31 

967,  288 
563,  613 
123,  250 
57,  725 
222,  700 

860,  774 
97,  850 
104,  775 
94,  850 
161,870 
143,  100 
116,  254 
82,  150 
42,  250 
17,  675 

1,  127,  895 
126,  400 
366,  400 
126,  500 
286,  345 
97,450 
87,  200 
37,  600 

1,  208,  763 
182,  425 
206,  200 
654,  213 
165,925 

519,  021 
40,886 
41,050 
176,585 
145,  900 
114,  600 

1,  072,  879 
261,873 
36,  500 
176,  060 

178,  696 
419,  750 

669,  120 
77,700 
91.  800 
240,  020 
126,550 
133,  050 

265,215 
43,  550 
75,450 

19 
7 
2 
1 
9 

22 
1 
3 
2 
6 
5 
1 
4 

128,849 
68,  354 
1,600 
275 
58,  620 

41,  248 
4,500 
2,150 
8,100 
5,203 
16,  765 
3,000 
1,530 

176 

25 
47 
49 
55 

375 
47 
55 
47 
63 
38 
45 
43 
27 
10 

246 
24 
49 
34 
63 
40 
26 
10 

339 
66 
53 
142 

78 

236 
24 
23 
79 
55 
55 

228 
61 
13 
56 

S 

223 
45 
42 
53 
44 
39 

150 
33 
40 
1 
76 

707,868 
238,967 
141,  661 
72,  522 

254,  718 

734,849 
122,633 
87,403 
75,954 
156,636 
92,  753 
98,  475 
39,  973 
42,  851 
18,  171 

900,  078 
90,  453 
177,  716 
121,492 
205,  576 
209,  465 
68,401 
26,  975 

844,434 
192,  058 
162,307 
384,300 
105,  769 

664,760 
41,771 
42,041 
267,344 
163,  285 
150,319 

1,550,051 
305,  001 
26,382 
254,  479 

419,  101 
545,088 

521,  970 
85,008 
59,  188 
151,051 
120,774 
105,  949 

272,  133 
53,245 

}   i  75,  645 
143,243 

123 

18 
32 
35 
38 

264 
36 
39 
30 
38 
31 
31 
28 
21 
10 

187 
18 
38 
24 
42 
35 
21 
9 

250 
44 
39 
105 
62 

180 
16 
17 
59 
38 
50 

162 
39 
8 
38 

41 
36 

181 
36 
30 
43 
39 
33 

118 
31 
f      26 
I       1 
60 

7,445 
1,676 
2,080 
1,011 
2,678 

13,  575 
2,293 
1,786 
1,680 
1,713 
1,976 
1,  295 
1,367 
1,128 
337 

12,419 
1,372 
2,370 
1,290 
3,070 
2,960 
927 
430 

15,  194 
3,261 
2,210 
7,607 
2,116 

12,530 
890 
772 
5,031 
2,942 
2,895 

19,715 
3,704 
349 
4,780 

4,  932 
5,950 

10,  551 
1,800 
1,  163 
3,177 
2,198 
2,213 

5,633 
1,472 
1,453 
17 
2,691 

Greater  New  York 

New  York 

Northern  New  England.. 
Southern  New  England.  . 

Central  Union 

Colorado 

Iowa 

Kansas             

Minnesota   ..        .... 

Missouri  -_ 

Nebraska-   

North  Dakota 

South.  Dakota 

Wyoming  Mission 

Columbia  Union  

52 
5 
13 
8 
16 
5 
3 
2 

43 

5 
8 
19 
11 

19 
3 
2 

7 
3 

4 

6 

184,  963 
21,  900 
81,  650 
13,  400 
51,  496 
5,617 
10,  100 
800 

65,  292 
7,663 
13,  969 
40,059 
3,601 

17,  534 
1,337 
282 
10,  240 
1,200 
4,475 

7,082 

Chesapeake 

East  Pennsylvania 

New  Jersey  

Ohio    

Potomac 

West  Pennsylvania. 

West  Virginia 

Lake  Union,  

Illinois 

Indiana 

Michigan  ... 

Wisconsin..  

North  Pacific  Union 

Idaho 

Montana  

Oregon  

Upper  Columbia 

Washington 

Pacific  Union  

Central  California 

Nevada-Utah 

Northern  California. 
Southeastern  California- 
Arizona  „  ..  ._  . 

3 

2 
1 

17 
3 
7 
4 
2 
1 

17 
3 
9 

2,900 

l;Jo8o2 

29,  843 
430 
5,106 
17,  543 
764 
6,000 

12,593 
2,658 
7,443 

Southern  California  

Southern  Union            .    . 

Alabama-Mississippi  

Carolina  ... 

Florida 

Georgia-Cumberland.  ... 
Kentucky-Tennessee  

Southwestern  Uni  on  

Arkansas-Louisiana  
Oklahoma 

Southwest  Indian  Mission 
Texas  

52 

146,  215 

6 

2,492 

1  Amount  for  Southwest  Indian  Mission  combined  with  figures  for  Oklahoma,  to  avoid  disclosing  the 
statistics  of  any  individual  church. 


SEVENTH-DAY   ADVENTIST   DEKOMIISTATIOK  27 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  l 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  religious  denomination  known  as  Seventh-day  Adventists  had  its  rise  about 
the  middle  of  the  nineteenth  century.  The  name  is  based  upon  two  of  the  dis- 
tinctive beliefs  they  hold,  namely,  the  observance  of  the  Sabbath  of  the  Scriptures, 
and  the  imminent,  personal  second  advent  of  Christ. 

In  those  years,  not  only  in  the  United  States,  but  in  other  countries  of  the  world, 
many  students  of  Bible  prophecy  became  convinced  that  the  second  advent  was 
drawing  near,  and  this  belief  resulted  in  a  great  religious  awakening,  in  Britain,  in 
some  countries  of  the  Continent  of  Europe,  and  in  North  America.  "Whether 
this  doctrine  is  orthodox  or  not,"  wrote  the  historian  Macaulay,  in  1829,  "many 
who  hold  it  are  distinguished  by  rank,  wealth,  and  ability.  It  is  preached  from 
pulpits  both  of  the  Scottish  and  of  the  English  church.7'  One  English  writer  of  the 
time  estimated  that  in  the  years  just  before  1840  about  700  clergymen  of  the 
Church  of  England  were  taking  part  in  the  awakening  movement. 

In  the  United  States  and  Canada  came  a  parallel  movement,  in  which  were 
represented  Christians  of  all  the  churches.  Among  prominent  leaders  in  the  pub- 
lishing and  evangelistic  work  of  this  second  advent  evangelism  were  William  Miller, 
a  Baptist  layman,  of  Low  Hampton,  N.  Y.,  and  Joshua  V.  Himes,  a  clergyman,  of 
Boston.  Monthly  and  weekly  papers  devoted  to  this  work  were  issued  in  Boston, 
New  York,  and  many  other  parts. 

It  was  from  among  the  Adventists  engaged  in  this  movement  in  America  that 
there  arose  a  small  group  in  1844,  in  Washington,  N.  H.,  who  began  to  observe  the 
seventh-day  Sabbath,  as  they  found  it  enjoined  in  the  fourth  commandment  of  the 
Decalogue.  Thus  came  the  first  Seventh-day  Adventists,  though  the  name  was 
not  formally  adopted  until  later  years. 

Prominent  among  those  who  pioneered  the  work  were  Joseph  Bates,  James 
White,  his  wife,  Mrs.  Ellen  G.  White,  Hiram  Edson,  Frederick  Wheeler,  and 
S.  W.  Rhodes.  Later  came  J.  H.  Waggoner,  J.  N.  Loughborough,  J.  N.  Andrews 
(who  was  the  first  Seventh-day  Adventist  missionary  to  be  sent  overseas  from  the 
United  States),  Uriah  Smith,  and  S.  N.  Haskell. 

By  1860  the  movement  had  grown  until,  in  connection  with  the  organization 
of  the  first  publishing  house  in  Battle  Creek,  Mich.,  the  denominational  name 
was  assumed.  The  following  year  saw  the  beginning  of  the  organization  of 
State  conferences  of  churches,  and  in  1863  the  General  Conference  was  organized, 
with  John  Byington  as  its  first  president.  In  order  to  decentralize  and  distribute 
administrative  responsibility,  local  State  conferences  are  grouped  in  fairly  large 
areas  as  a  union  conference,  with  a  union  corps  of  officers.  The  union  conferences 
in  continental  areas  are  grouped  again  as  divisions — as  North  American,  South 
American,  southern  Asia,  Australasian,  etc.,  covering  all  continents — each 
division  having  its  staff  of  officers.  There  are  12  divisions.  Representatives 
from  each  division  make  up  the  General  Conference  committee,  with  headquarters 
in  Washington,  D.  C.  For  about  half  a  century  the  headquarters  had  been  at 
Battle  Creek,  Mich.,  where  the  first  equipped  publishing  house  was  built,  also 
their  first  medical  sanitarium  (with  which  grew  up  the  early  health  food  pro- 
motion), and  their  first  college.  In  1903,  however,  the  general  offices  were  re- 
moved to  Washington, 

DOCTRINE 

Very  briefly  stated,  the  main  features  of  Seventh-day  Adventist  teaching  are 
as  follows: 

1.  Holy  Scripture  the  rule  of  faith  and  practice.     (2  Tim.  3:15—17.) 

2.  The  Godhead,  or  Trinity,  consists  of  the  Eternal  Father,  the  Son  of  the 
Eternal  Father,  through  whom  all  things  were  created,  the  Holy  Spirit,  the  third 
person  of  the  Godhead,  the  great  regenerating  power  in  the  work  of  redemption. 
(Matt.  28:19.) 

3.  Jesus  Christ  is  very  God.     While  retaining  His  divine  nature  He  took  upon 
Himself  the  nature  of  the  human  family,  died  for  our  sins,  rose  from  the  dead, 
and  in  heaven  ever  lives  to  make  intercession  for  us.     (John  1:1,  14;  Heb.  2:9-18; 
8:1,  2;  7: 25.) 

*  This  statement,  which  differs  somewhat  from  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Beligioiis  Bodies, 
1926,  has  been  revised  by  a  committee  named  for  the  purpose,  and  presented  in  its  present  form  by  H.  E. 
Rogers,  statistical  secretary,  General  Conference  of  Seventh-day  Adventists,  Takoma  Park,  Washington, 
D.  C. 


28  CENSUS   OF   BELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

4.  The  new  birth,  through  faith,  by  the  recreative  power  of  God.     (John 
3:3,  16.) 

5.  Baptism  of  believers,  by  immersion.     (Mark  16: 16;  Rom.  6: 1-6.) 

6.  The  ten  commandments,  the  moral  law  of  God,  the  standard  of  the  judgment. 
(Ex.  20 : 1-17;  Matt.  5 : 17-19;  Eccl.  12 : 13,  14.) 

7.  The  fourth  commandment  of  God's  law  enjoins  the  observance  of  the 
seventh  day  as  the  Sabbath  of  the  Lord  our  God,  made  holy  for  all  mankind. 
(Gen.  2:1-3;  Ex.  20:8-11;  Mark  2:27,  28.) 

8.  "Sin  is  the  transgression  of  the  law."     (1  John  3:4.)     "The  wages  of  sin  is 
death."     (Rom.  6 -23.)     Having  sinned,  man  cannot  save  himself,  nor  can  the 
law  justify  him.     God  so  loved  the  world  that  He  gave  His  Son,  even  Jesus  Christ, 
to  die  in  man's  stead;  accepting  Chrst  by  faith,  as  his  substitute,  the  sinner  is 
justified  by  the  Saviour's  grace,  who  cleanses  from  sin,  creates  the  new  heart, 
and  abides  within  by  His  Spirit,  to  work  obedience.     Thus  the  gospel  becomes 
"the  power  of  God  unto  salvation  to  every  one  that  believeth."     (Rom.  1:16.) 

9.  Man  is  by  nature  mortal.     God  "only  hath  immortality."     (1  Tim.  6:16.) 
Immortality  and  eternal  life  come  to  redeemed  man  only  as  the  free  gift  in  Christ; 
and  "this  mortal  shall  put  on  immortality"  at  the  second  coming  of  Christ. 
(1  Cor.  15:51-55.) 

10.  The  condition  of  man  in  death  is  that  of  unconscious  sleep.     All  men,  good 
and  evil  alike,  in  death  remain  in  the  grave  until  the  resurrection.     (Eccl.  9:  .5,  G; 
Ps.  146:3,  4;  John  5:28,  29.) 

11.  The  resurrection  of  the  just  takes  place  at  the  second  advent  of  Christ 
(1  Tliess.  4:13-18),  that  of  the  unjust,  a  thousand  years  later,  at  the  close  of  the 
millennium.     (Rev.  20:5-10.) 

12.  The  impenitent,  including  Satan,  the  author  of  sin,  are  destroyed,  brought 
to  a  state  of  nonexistence.     (Rom.  6: 23;  Mai.  4:  1-3;  Rev.  20:  9, 10;  Obadiah  16.) 

13.  The  Christian  is  to  live  and  act  and  eat  and  drink  to  the  glory  of  God, 
recognizing  his  body  as  the  temple  of  the  Holy  Spirit.     Thus  the  believer  will 
clothe  the  body  in  neat,  modest,  dignified  apparel,  and  will  be  led  to  abstain  from 
all  intoxicating  drinks,  tobacco,  and  other  narcotics.     (1  Cor.  3:  16,  17;  9:  25; 
10:  31;  1  Tim.  2:  9,  10;  1  John  2:  6.) 

14.  Gospel  work  is  to  be  supported  by  the  Scripture  plan  of  tithes  and  offerings. 
(Lev.  27:  30:  Mai.  3:  8-12;  Matt.  23:  23;  1  Cor.  9:  9-14;  2  Cor.  9:  6-15.) 

15.  Seventh-day  Adventists  believe  that  the  Bible  and  the  Bible  alone  is  the 
authority  for  all  faith  and  doctrine,  and  the  standard  by  which  all  religious  teaching 
is  to  be  judged.     Believing  also  in  the  impartation  of  the  Holy  Spirit  to  the  church 
for  all  time,  they  accept  the  Scriptural  teaching  regarding  the  manifestation  of 
spiritual  gifts  as  a  means  by  which  the  church  is  edified  and  built  up — the  gifts  of 
apostleship,  prophecy,  teaching,  evangelism,   etc.    (1   Cor.   12:  28-30;  Eph.  4: 
1 1-14.)    As  the  gift  of  prophecy  is  among  these  gifts  listed,  they  accept  the  admoni- 
tion of  Paul,  "Despise  not  prophesyings.     Prove  all  things;  hold  fast  that  which 
is  good."     From 'the  beginning  of  the  movement  they  have  had  constant  and 
cumulative  evidence  that  through  the  counsels  and  writings  of  Ellen  G.  White, 
the  Holy  Spirit  has  given  special  help  to  the  church.     The  counsel  and  instruction 
thus  received,  has  been  a  potent  factor  in  the  maintenance  of  unity  of  doctrine  and 
of  organization  for  world-wide  service. 

16.  The  second  coming  of  Christ  is  the  hope  of  the  church,  the  climax  of  the 
plan  of  salvation,  spoken  of  by  all  the  prophets  "since  the  world  began."     (Acts 
3:  19-21.)     While  no  man  knows  the  day  and  the  hour,  Christ  and  all  prophecy 
have  foretold  signs  by  which  it  may  be  known  when  it  "is  near,  even  at  the  doors." 
The  gospel  message  in  these  times,  it  is  believed,  must  call  attention  to  the  signs 
of  the  times  and  to  the  message  of  preparation  to  meet  the  Lord.     The  closing 
ministry  of  Jesus  in  heaven,  before  He  comes,  is  a  work  of  judgment,  which  will 
determine  between  the  just  and  the  unjust.     (Dan.  7:  9,  10.)     When  that  judg- 
ment begins  in  the  heavenly  temple,  the  gospel  message  is  due  to  the  world;  "The 
hour  of  His  judgment  is  come."     (Rev.    14:  6,   7.)     Seventh-day  Adventists 
believe  it  is  their  work  to  carry  that  message  to  every  people  and  tongue. 

17.  The  order  of  events  of  the  second  advent  are  understood  to  be  as  follows: 
The  voice  of  Christ  calls  forth  the  just  of  all  the  ages  from  their  graves,  the  living 
righteous  being  translated.     All  ascend  with  Jesus  to  heaven.     The  glory  of  His 
corning  has  consumed  the  unjust.     The  earth  is  desolated,  uninhabited  *by  men 
for  a  thousand  years,  the  prison  house  of  Satan.     (1  Thess.  4:  16,  17;  1:  7-9; 
Rev.  20:  1-3,  5.) 

18.  The  millennial  reign  of  Christ  covers  the  period  between  the  first  and 
second  resurrection,  during  which  the  saved  live  with  Him  in  heaven.     At  the  end 
of  the  thousand  years,  the  Holy  City,  with  Christ  and  the  saved,  descend  to  earth, 


SEVENTH-DAY   ADVENT1ST   DENOMINATION"  29 

the  wicked  are  raised  in  the  second  resurrection;  led  by  Satan  they  come  up 
against  the  Lord  and  the  city.  Pinal  judgment  is  pronounced  upon  them,  and 
fire  consumes  them  utterly.  Death  itself  is  destroyed,  and  the  grave.  Satan  is 
no  more.  All  traces  of  sin  are  removed  by  the  purifying  fires,  and  the  earth  comes 
forth,  recreated,  restored  to  the  purity  and  beauty  of  the  original  Eden.  'The 
meek  shall  inherit  the  earth."  It  becomes  the  eternal  home  of  the  redeemed  of 
Adam's  race.  (Rev.  20:  7-15;  21:  1-5.)  There  is  then  no  sin  or  pain  in  all  the 
universe,  and  every  creature  gives  praise  to  God.  (Rev.  5:  13.) 

ORGANIZATION 

The  local  church. — The  local  church  is  congregational  in  its  government,  although 
under  the  general  supervision  of  the  conference  of  which  it  its  a  member.  One 
or  more  elders — generally  laymen — are  elected  annually  to  care  for  the  spiritual 
interests  of  the  church,  conduct  services,  and,  in  the  absence  of  an  ordained 
minister,  to  administer  the  sacraments.  One  or  more  deacons  and  deaconesses 
are  also  elected  annually  to  care  for  the  financial  and  administrative  work.  In 
the  case  of  large  congregations,  particularly  in  cities,  ordained  ministers  are 
sometimes  appointed  by  the  conference  as  pastors,  but  usually  they  act  as  evange- 
lists, having  supervision  of  a  number  of  local  churches,  and  directing  their  chief 
effort  to  evangelistic  work  in  the  development  of  new  churches. 

Local,  union,  and  General  Conference. — A  number  of  churches  are  united  to 
form  a  conference  or  mission.  The  conference  meets  biennially  and  is  composed 
of  delegates  elected  by  the  churches.  The  conference  has  general  supervision 
of  the  churches  and  their  work.  In  some  large  States  there  are  two  or  more  of 
these  conferences,  and  as  a  matter  of  convenience  the  term  "local  conference" 
has  come  into  use.  The  local  conferences  or  missions  are  united  into  groups  to 
form  union  conferences,  which  hold  sessions  quadrennially,  and  to  which  delegates 
are  elected  by  the  local  conferences.  The  union  conferences  and  union  missions 
throughout  the  world  are  united  in  the  General  Conference,  which  holds  quadren- 
nial sessions  composed  of  delegates  from  union  conferences  and  union  missions 
throughout  the  world.  For  convenience  in  administering  the  work  of  the  General 
Conference,  the  world  field  is  divided  into  12  divisions,  each  with  its  staff  of 
division  officers,  presided  over  by  a  vice  president  of  the  General  Conference. 

Executive  committees. — Each  local  conference  and  local  mission  has  an  executive 
committee  for  the  conduct  of  its  work,  composed  of  its  officers  and  other  elected 
or  appointed  members.  The  union  conference  president,  secretary,  and  treasurer, 
together  with  the  presidents  of  the  local  conferences  and  superintendents  of 
local  missions  and  other  elected  members,  compose  the  executive  committee  of 
the  union  conference.  The  president,  secretary,  and  treasurer,  the  field  secre- 
taries of  the  division,  the  presidents  of  union  conferences,  and  superintendents 
of  union  missions,  with  division  departmental  secretaries,  and  other  appointed 
members,  constitute  the  executive  committee  of  the  division.  The  president  of 
the  General  Conference,  and  other  officers  of  the  General  Conference  and  the 
divisions,  the  field  secretaries,  together  with  General  Conference  and  division 
departmental  secretaries,  the  union  conference  presidents  and  superintendents  of 
union  missions,  and  other  elected  members,  constitute  the  General  Conference 
executive  committee. 

WORK 

Membership  and  work. — Applicants  for  church  membership  appear  before  the 
pastor  or  officers  of  the  local  church  for  examination.  If  approved,  they  are 
recommended  for  baptism  and  church  membership. 

Candidates  for  the  gospel  ministry  are  licensed  to  preach,  for  a  limited  term, 
by  a  conference,  either  local,  union,  or  general.  At  the  expiration  of  that  term, 
on  approval  by  the  conference,  they  are  recommended  for  ordination. 

Local  church  expenses  are  met  by  special  contributions,  and  collections  are 
made  during  the  year  for  the  different  departments  of  denominational  work. 
An  effort  is  also  being  made  to  collect  a  sum  amounting  to  40  cents  per  week  per 
member  for  foreign  mission  work.  The  support  of  the  ministry  is  provided  by 
the  tithing  system,  each  church  member  being  expected  to  contribute  a  tenth  of 
his  net  income  for  this  purpose.  The  tithes  are  paid  through  a  church  treasurer 
to  the  treasurer  of  the  local  conference.  The  conference  supervises  the  work  of 
ministers  and  pays  the  salaries.  Associations  for  the  holding  of  property  belong- 
ing to  the  denomination  have  been  formed  in  nearly  every  country  in  which  work 
is  carried  on.  The  jurisdiction  of  these  associations  is  coextensive  with  that  of  a 
conference,  local,  or  union,  and  their  officers  are  the  officers  of  the  conference, 


30  CENSUS   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

while  their  constituencies  consist  of  the  delegates  to  the  sessions  of  the  conference. 
The  associations  connected  with  local  conferences  hold  in  trust  all  the  property 
for  the  local  churches,  while  associations  formed  for  union  conferences  hold  prop- 
erty of  a  more  general  character. 

In  all  the  world. — Believing  in  the  command  of  our  Saviour,  as  expressed  in 
Matthew  28:  19 — "Go  ye  therefore,  and  teach  all  nations" — Seventh -day  Ad- 
ventists  have  literally  gone  forth  into  all  the  world,  carrying  the  gospel  message 
to  all  lands. 

At  the  close  of  1936,  Seventh-day  Adventists  were  conducting  work  in  378 
countries,  islands,  and  island  groups,  by  26,553  evangelistic  and  institutional 
laborers,  who  are  using  in  their  work  649  languages  and  dialects.  This  was  an 
increase  of  71  languages  during  1936,  or  practically  1  new  language  added  every 
5  days  during  that  year.  Since  1926,  393  languages  have  been  added,  or  1  new 
language  added  on  an  average  of  a  little  less  than  10  days. 

The  membership  of  the  8,243  churches  of  the  denomination  throughout  the 
world  at  the  close  of  1936  was  438,139.  In  the  United  States  there  were  153,125 
while  outside  there  were  285,014.  There  are  70  union  conferences,  143  local 
conferences,  328  missions,  with  12,589  evangelistic  laborers.  The  first  missionary 
was  sent  outside  the  United  States  in  1874.  Since  that  time  there  have  been 
about  5,000  missionaries  sent  to  labor  outside  this  country. 

Educational. — In  1872,  the  first  denominational  missionary  training  school  was 
opened  in  Battle  Creek,  Mich.  At  the  close  of  1936  there  was  in  operation  a 
graded  system  of  education,  requiring  16  years'  work  for  completion,  and  includ- 
ing, in  all  countries,  33  literary  and  theological  colleges  and  junior  colleges,  1 
medical  college,  187  academies  and  intermediate  schools,  and  2,514  primary 
schools.  All  these  schools  had  5,715  teachers.  The  enrollment  of  the  2,514 

Primary  schools  was  83,605,  and  of  the  advanced  schools,  29,227,  a  total  of  112,832. 
a  the  United  States  the  enrollment  was  33,849.     The  earnings  and  contributions 
received  by  all  the  schools  throughout  the  world  for  1936  were  $7,081,983.     The 
schools  in  the  United  States  received  $5,307,296. 

Health  promotion. — In  1866  a  sanitarium  was  erected  in  Battle  Creek,  Mich., 
for  the  rational  treatment  of  disease  and  the  dissemination  of  the  principles  of 
temperance  and  healthful  living.  At  the  close  of  1936  there  were  95  well-equipped 
sanitariums,  and  68  hydropathic  treatment  rooms,  throughout  the  world,  in 
addition  to  a  number  of  dispensaries  and  about  50  medical  institutions  under 
private  management  that  are  recognized  as  following  the  denominational  prin- 
ciples. All  these  institutions  treated  625,083  patients  during  1936.  Physicians, 
nurses,  and  other  employees  number  5,995. 

Publishing. — The  first  really  equipped  denominational  publishing  house  was 
erected  in  Battle  Creek,  Mich.,  in  1855.  At  the  close  of  1936  there  were  17 
publishing  houses  and  branches  in  the  United  States,  and  56  in  other  countries, 
a  total  of  73  publishing  houses  and  branches,  engaged  exclusively  in  the  pro- 
duction and  sale  of  denominational  literature.  These  houses  issue  282  periodicals, 
in  194  languages,  have  1,154  employees  engaged  in  production  of  literature,  and 
3,383  colporteurs  employed  in  its  distribution.  Literature  sales  in  1936  amounted 
to  $3,622,299.  The  total  value  of  book  and  periodical  sales  from  1863  to  the  close 
of  1936  was  $109,948,167. 


SEVENTH-DAY   ADVENTIST    DENOMINATION"  31 

A  statement  showing  the  growth  in  respect  to  churches  and  membership  by 
20-year  periods  is  indicated  below: 

Year:                                                                                        Churches  Membership 

1863 125  3,500 

1883 680  17,436 

1903 2,  120  69,072 

1923 5,  096  221,  874 

1936 8,  243  438,  139 

Another  statement  showing  the  total  amount  of  eyangelistical  funds  raised 
during  the  20  years  preceding  the  date  shown  below,  is  indicated  herewith: 

Total  evangelistk 
funds  during  preceding 
Year:  SO  years 

1882 $747,  216.  06 

1902 7,  948,  103.  27 

1922 79,  614,  141.  76 

1936  (14  years) 152,166,358.64 


Total 240,  475,  819.  73 

Of  this  amount  there  has  been  contributed  as:  Percent 

Tithe $133,267,000.  11  55.42 

Foreign  missions 71,  102,  663.  19  29.  57 

Home  missions 36,  106,  156.  43  15.  01 

Total 240,  475,  819.  73        100.  00 

The  number  of  evangelistical  and  institutional  laborers  connected  with  the 
denominational  work  is  indicated  below  by  20-year  periods: 

Year:  Totallaborers 

1863 30 

1883  300 

1903 4,704 

1923 15, 156 

1936 26,553 


CHURCH  OF  GOD  (ADVENTIST) 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Church  of  God  (Adventist)  for  the  year  1936 
is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  comprises  all  baptized  persons  who  have 
been  received  into  fellowship  in  the  local  churches  upon  profession  of  faith. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY  OF   STATISTICS  FOE   CHURCHES  IN   URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF  TOTAL  l 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

45 

1,250 
28 

512 
723 
15 
70,8 

55 
1,024 
171 
5.1 

22 

17 
$22,  690 
$22,  190 
$500 
$1,  335 
2 
$1,380 
10 

2 
1 
$1,000 

32 

$9,  732 
$1,  265 
$35 
$318 

$520 
$936 
$321 
$2,943 
$1,  106 
$1,  700 
$588 
$304 

25 
154 
649 

9 

326 
36 

152 

174 

36 

924 
26 

360 
549 
15 
65,6 

34 

728 
162 
4.5 

17 
12 
$14,  390 
$13,890 
$500 
$1,  199 

Members  ,  number 

26.1 

73.9 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

29.7 
24.1 

70.3 
75.9 

^Female          -                  - 

Sex  not  reported  -            _  _ 

Males  per  100  females  ...       .  

87.4 

21 
296 
9 
6.6 

5 
5 

$8,  300 
$8,  300 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years  -  

13  years  and  over  

28.9 
5.3 

71.1 
94.7 

Age  not  reported  

Percent  under  13  years  2__  _  

Church  edifices,  Tyumhftr 

Value  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported  

36.6 
37.4 

63.4 
62.6 
100.0 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936_. 
Average  v  alue  per  church  _.    

$1,  660 
2 
$1,  380 
3 

2 
1 
$1,  000 

9 

$3,  607 
$1,  065 
$25 
$130 

$520 
$697 
$130 
$300 
$105 
$550 
$85 
$401 

5 
26 
150 

Debt  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported 

100.0 

Number  reporting  "no  debt"  

7 

Parsonages,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

100  0 

Expenditures: 

Churches  reporting,  number           

23 
$6,  125 
$200 
$10 
$188 

Amount  reported  .  _    

37.1 
84.2 

62.9 

15.8 

Pastors'  salaries  .  _ 

All  other  salaries   __    

Repairs  and  improvements 

40.9 

100.0 
74.5 
40.5 
10.2 
9.5 
32.4 
14.5 

59.1 

25.1 
59.5 
89.8 
90.5 
67.6 
85.5 

Payment   on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest      

All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest. 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Bed  Cross,  etc  
Home  missions  _  .. 

$239 
$191 
$2,  643 
$1,  001 
$1,  150 
$503 
$266 

20 
128 
499 

Foreign  missions    ...    _>    . 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  
All  other  purposes 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

Sabbath  schools  : 

Churches  reporting,  number       ... 

Officers  and  teachers  .. 

16.9 
23.1 

83.1 
76.9 

Scholars  __     _ 

*  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

1  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

32 


CHURCH   OF  GOD    (ADVENTIST) 


33 


Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Church  of  God  (Adventist) 
for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

191)6 

190G 

Clvurclies  (local  organizations),  number 

45 

58 

22 

10 

Increase  1  over  preceding  census: 
Number    -                 _  -  .,_  _    -, 

—  13 

36 

12 

Percent2  

MeinberSj  number     „.,-,„    -,  -,.,„-  -,„„„  ...,    ..^    .„..,-„»„- 

1,250 

1,686 

848 

354 

Increase  i  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

—436 

838 

494 

Percent 

-25  8 

98  8 

139.5 

Average  membership  per  church  _  - 

28 

29 

39 

35 

Churcli  edifices,  number       -                -                  

22 

12 

8 

3 

Value  —  number  reporting 

17 

12 

8 

3 

Amount  reported  - 

$22,  690 

$25,  850 

$8,  200 

$4,  000 

Average  value  per  church 

$1,  335 

$2,  154 

$1,  025 

$1.  333 

D0ht  —  number  reporting 

2 

3 

1 

Amount  reported                   «.                 .  »  

$1,  380 

$975 

$700 

PsxsoH&ces  number 

2 

Value  —  number  reporting 

1 

Amount  reported  

$1,  000 

Expenditures  : 

Churches  reporting,  nnTnb6r 

32 

39 

10 

Amount  reported                          .            ______ 

$9,  732 

$13,  887 

$2,  358 

Pastors'  salaries        .    

$1,  265 

All  other  salaries                     ---     -- 

$35 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$318 

$4,  805 

$1,  258 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest... 
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest.. 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc-  

$520 
$936 
$321 

Home  missions 

$2,  943 

Foreign  missions 

$1,  106 

$9,  082 

$1,100 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$1,  700 

All  other  purposes 

$588 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$304 

$356 

$236 

Sabbath,  schools  : 

Churches  reporting,  number               .  -  

25 

23 

9 

Officers  and  teachers 

154 

126 

52 

Scholars                                              -  _._._«_._.__ 

649 

685 

326 

i  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Church  of  God 
(Adventist)  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936"  the  number  and 
membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or 
rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sabbath  schools. 
Table  4  gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for 
the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified 
as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the 
value  of  church  edifices  and  the  debt  on  such  property  for  1936.  Table  6  pre- 
sents, for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses, 
improvements,  benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  ^  disclosing  the  financial 
statistics  of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables  5  and  6  is 
limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value  and  expendi- 
tures. 


34 


CENSUS   OF   EELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SABBATH  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGEAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY 
SEX 

SABBATH 
SCHOOLS 

3 

o 

B 

t-4 
P 

1 

P3 

'3 

4-3 

o 

EH 

1  Urban 

"c3 

3 

PH 

03 

1 

Female 

4 

«! 

M  fi 
<D 

ra 

Males  per 
100  females  * 

Churches 
reporting 

Officers  and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States  

45 

2 
5 

9 

36 

1,250 

326 

18 

83 

924 

512 

723 

22 
53 

56 
167 
57 
9 

51 

19 
123 
65 

35 
12 

28 
26 

15 

70  8 

25 

1 

2 

1 
7 
2 
1 

3 

154 

649 

EAST  NOKTH  CENTRA.!/ 
Michigan 

1 

1 

5 

1 
11 
2 
1 

1 

46 
85 

97 
279 
87 
17 

104 

25 
209 
123 

55 
24 

S3 
46 

28 

85 

14 
279 

87 
17 

28 

209" 
34 

55 

24 

18 
46 

24 
32 

41 
97 
30 
8 

53 

6 
86 

58 

20 
12 

25 
20 

6 

8 

7 
41 
21 
4 

12 

20 
11 

17 
155 
75 
12 

91 

Wis  consin                            

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Iowa       -                        

3 
11 

2 

[Missouri 

15 

59  5 

Nebraska- 

9 

TC  arises 

1 

76 

25 
"89" 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
West  Virginia 

3 

1 
5 

2 
1 

WEST  SOTJTH  CENTRAL: 

Arkansas  .           

Oklahoma.               

5 
2 

2 
1 

2 
2 

69.9 

4 
1 

31 

4 

189 
40 

Texas  

3 

? 

1 

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho 

Colorado 

1 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

4 
? 

2 

35 

2 
1 

7 
13 

24 
15 

Oregon 

i  Eatio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

TABLE  4. — NUMBER   AND    MEMBERSHIP    OF    CHURCHES,    1906   TO    1936,    AND 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

[  Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926, 1916,  or  1906] 


STATE 

NUMBER  OF  CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1938 

1910 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Under 
13 

years 

13 

years 
and 
over 

Age 
not  re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
13i 

United  States.... 
Michigan 

45 

2 
5 
3 

11 

2 
3 

58 

2 
3 
3 
15 
3 

32 

10 

1,250 

1,686 

848 

354 

55 

1,024 

171 

5.1 

3 

46 

85 
97 
279 

87 

104 

20 
31 
69 
669 
147 

153 



4 
2 
12 
3 

42 
83 
85 
208 
12 

98 

Wisconsin  

Iowa 

2 

7 

2 
4 
2 

50 
379 

60 
159 
56 

Missouri 

68 
75 

1  4 

Nebraska         ..  .. 

West  Virginia  

6 

5.8 

Alabama    _  „  .  

3 

12 

1 

4 

63 
249 

25 
130 

Oklahoma  

5 
3 

2 

209 
123 

79 

6 
16 
3 

3 

203 
88 
41 

164 

2.9 

15.4 

Texas 

19 
9 

Washington 

4 

53 

Other  States  _ 

27 

17 

5 



167 

438 

111 



1.8 

1  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported;  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

2  Includes  2  churches  each  in  the  States  of  Idaho  and  Oregon;  and  1  m  each  of  the  followm  g— Kansas 
Arkansas,  and  Colorado. 


CHURCH   OF   GOD    (ADVENTIST) 


35 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OP  CHUKCHES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH  DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


Total 

Number  of 

VALUE  01 
EDI* 

-  CHURCH 
ICES 

DEBT  ON 
EDIE 

CHURCH 
ICES 

churches 

edifices 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States 

45 

22 

17 

$22  690 

2 

$1  380 

Missouri  _  

11 

7 

6 

6,100 

Other  States 

34 

15 

1  11 

16  590 

2 

1  380 

i  Includes  2  churches  in  each  of  the  following  States— Iowa,  Oklahoma,  and  Idaho;  and  1  in  each  of  the 
following — Michigan,  Nebraska,  Arkansas,  Texas,  and  Washington. 

TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Repairs 
and 
improve- 
ments 

United  States 

45 

32 

$9,  732 

81,  265 

$35 

$318 

Iowa 

3 
11 
5 

4 

22 

3 
6 

4 

4 

i  15 

460 
543 
646 
1,747 

6,336 

130 
135 

Missouri..  _  _              

10 

Oklahoma 

200 
700 

365 

Washington 

Other  States        »                -  

25 

53 

STATE 

EXPENDITURES—  -continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
includmi 
interest 

Local 
relief  and 
;    charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To 

general 
head- 
quarters 

All 
other 
purposes 

United  States 

$520 

$936 

$321 

$2,943 

81,  106 

81,  700 

$588 

Iowa 

120 

210 
15 
102 
97 

512 

Missouri                         

3 
43 
10 

265 

195 
296 
280 

929 

185 
5 
160 

238 

Oklahoma 

"Washington 

400 

100 
2,843 

Other  States                       —  . 

1,106 

i  Includes  2  churches  in  each  of  the  following  States— Michigan,  Wisconsin,  West  Virginia, Texas, Idaho, 
and  Oregon;  and  1  in  each  of  the  following—Nebraska,  Kansas,  and  Arkansas. 


36  CENSUS   OF  BELIGIOUS   BODIES,   1936 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 

DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

In  the  year  1863  there  were  many  people  in  various  parts  of  the  United  States 
who  held  to  the  observance  of  the  seventh-day  Sabbath  and  were  looking  for  the 
soon  return  of  Christ,  but  who  either  had  never  been  connected  with  the  Seventh- 
day  Adventists,  or  who  had  rejected  the  inspiration  of  the  so-called  "visions"  of 
Mrs.  E.  G.  White.  These  people  were  scattered  and  unorganized.  In  the 
summer  of  1863  a  number  of  t-hem  associated  together  and  began  the  publication 
of  a  monthly  paper,  named  "The  Hope  of  Israel."  The  first  issue  was  dated 
August  10,  1863,  and  was  issued  from  Hartford,  Mich.  Enos  Easton  was  editor 
and  Samuel  Davison  and  Gilbert  Cranmer  were  leaders  of  the  work.  Some  of 
those  supporting  the  paper  were  loosely  organized  under  the  name  "Church  of 
Christ"  while  others  held  to  the  name  "Church  of  God."  But  they  were  united 
in  faith  in  the  soon  coming  of  Christ  and  a  number  of  other  doctrines,  and  also 
were  opposed  to  accepting  the  "visions"  of  Mrs.  E.  G.  White. 

The  paper  was  soon  move'd  to  Waverly,  Mich.,  where  publication  continued 
until  October  1865,  when  it  was  forced  to  discontinue  for  lack  of  financial  support. 

In  the  month  of  May  1866,  "The  Hope  of  Israel"  was  revived,  being  issued  at 
Marion,  Iowa,  by  an  association  of  some  of  the  original  group,  and  others  who 
had  joined  with  them,  under  the  name  "Christian  Publishing  Association." 
The  movement  had  received  fresh  impetus  through  two  prominent  Adyentist 
ministers,  who  had  refused  to  accept  the  inspiration  of  Mrs.  E.  G.  White,  joining 
with  them.  These  were  B.  P.  Snook  and  W.  H.  Brinkerhoff,  who  with  W.  E. 
Carver,  were  the  leaders  of  the  revived  work.  Later  Jacob  Brinkerhoff  became 
one  of  the  principal  leaders.  The  name  "Church  of  God"  was  then  in  general 
use  by  these  brethren  and  soon  was  adopted  as  a  distinctive  name.  The  ministers 
were  practically  all  evangelists,  and  local  churches  were  established  throughout 
the  country. 

The  history  of  the  church  is  closely  connected  with  the  history  of  the  publica- 
tion which  continued  to  be  published  in  Marion,  Iowa,  until  the  year  1889,  when 
it  was  moved  to  Stanberry,  Moc  The  name  of  the  paper  was  changed  several 
times,  and  it  is  now  known  as  "The  Bible  Advocate  and  Herald  of  the  Coming 
Kingdom." 

Some  of  the  churches  formed  remained  independent  from  the  general  organiza- 
tion, although  holding  the  same  beliefs.  In  1906  these  were  registered  as  a 
separate  body  under  the  title  of  Churches  of  God  (Adventist)  Unattached  Con- 
gregations. Many  such  independent  groups  still  exist. 

DOCTRINE 

The  Church  of  God  (Adventist)  has  no  formal  written  creed  but  believes  in 
constantly  growing  in  the  knowledge  of  the  Bible,  which  it  accepts  as  the  sole  rale 
of  faith  and  practice.  Among  the  doctrines  upon  which  the  church  as  a  whole 
stands  united  are:  (1)  The  observance  of  the  seventh  day  of  the  week  as  the 
Sabbath.  (2)  The  literal  and  premillennial  second  coming  of  Christ,  and  that 
present-day  events  indicate  that  this  will  take  place  soon.  (3)  The  unconscious 
state  of  the  dead.  (4)  The  resurrection  of  the  righteous  dead  at  the  second 
advent  of  Christ  and  their  reign  with  Christ  on  the  earth  during  1,000  years  of 
restitution.  (5)  The  complete  destruction  of  the  wicked  at  the  end  of  the  1,000 
years.  (6)  The  eternal  reward  of  the  righteous  on  the  earth,  made  new. 

(7)  That  Christ  was  crucified  on  Wednesday  and  arose  near  sundown  Saturday. 

(8)  That  the  Lord's  Supper  service  was  instituted  by  Christ  to  take  the  place  of 
the  ancient  Passover,  and  should  be  observed  annually,  at  the  time  of  the  Passover. 

(9)  That  the  Ten  Commandment  law  is  recognized  in  Scripture  as  distinct  from 
the  Law  of  Moses.     (10)  That  sin  is  the  transgression  of  the  Ten  Commandment 
law.     (11)  That  acceptance  of  Christ  is  followed  by  repentance/baptism  by  im- 
mersion in  water,  and  the  reception  of  the  Holy  Spirit,  followed  by  Hghteous  living. 


*  This  statement,  which  differs  somewhat  from  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on 
Bodies,  1926,  was  furnished  by  Roy  Davison,  president,  General  Conference  of  the  Church  of  God,  Stan- 
berry,  Mo.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


OHUKOH   OF   GOD    (ADVENTIST)  37 

ORGANIZATION 

In  polity  the  denomination  is  essentially  congregational.  This  is  modified 
somewhat  by  the  fact  that  a  large  proportion  of  the  membership  is  composed  of 
isolated  members.  Where  there  are  enough  members  in  a  State,  they  are  organized 
into  a  local  conference.  At  this  writing  there  are  nine  such  conference  organiza- 
tions, some  of  which  include  several  States.  Each  local  conference  has  an  executive 
board  which  directs  the  evangelistic  work  in  its  territory.  Of  the  tithes  received, 
one-tenth  is  sent  for  the  work  of  the  General  Conference,  which  includes  all  the  local 
conferences  and  all  unorganized  territory. 

Candidates  for  the  ministry  first  are  issued  licenses  on  recommendation  of  a 
church  or  conference.  After  having  gained  experience  and  proven  their  calling, 
they  may  be  ordained  into  the  ministry  by  prayer  and  the  laying  on  of  hands  in  a 
public  service,  by  other  ordained  ministers  of  the  church.  Ministers  are  referred 
to  by  the  title  "elder,"  no  other  religious  titles  indicating  office  being  used. 

WORK 

The  organized  conferences  employ  evangelists  who  work  for  the  spreading  of  the 
gospel  and  the  building  up  of  the  church  in  their  territories.  Work  in  unorganized 
territory  is  conducted  by  the  General  Conference,  with  funds  given  or  allotted  for 
that  purpose. 

The  church  maintains  one  publishing  house  from  which  is  issued  many  books 
and  tracts.  Besides  the  general  church  paper,  "The  Bible  Advocate,"  there  are 
also  issued,  "The  Sabbath  School  Missionary  and  Young  People's  Friend,"  a 
biweekly  for  children  and  young  people;  "The  Field  Messenger,"  a  monthly 
church  news  magazine;  and  "The  Sabbath  School  Quarterly,"  a  quarterly  booklet 
of  Bible  lessons.  The  printing  plant  is  known  as  "The  Church  of  God  Publishing 
House,"  and  is  located  at  Stanberry,  Mo. 


LIFE  AND  ADVENT  UNION 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  TJnited  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Life  and  Advent  Union  for  the  year  1936  is 
presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  comprises  those  persons  who  have  been 
baptized,  by  immersion,  and  have  subscribed  to  the  articles  of  faith  of  the  local 
churches. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY  OF   STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  ANB  RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Ghurclies  (local  organizations),  number 

6 

352 
59 

105 
170 
77 
61.8 

5 

300 
60 

88 
135 
77 
65.2 

1 

52 
52 

17 
35 

Members  number                       --     -  -- 

85.2 

14.8 

Average  membership  per  church          ..-- 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male            -  

83.8 
79.4 

16  2 
20.6 

Female       _-  - 

Sex  not  reported    

Males  per  100  females 

00 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years           -       _  _  

13  years  and.  over  -.  

352 

5 
5 
$42,  500 
$42,  500 
$8,500 
3 
$5,  250 
2 

6 

$8,  916 
$4,  605 
$445 
$194 

$50 

$1,564 
$35 
$289 
$1,734 
$1,486 

4 
41 

181 

300 

4 
4 
$32,  500 
$32,  500 
$8,125 
3 
$5,250 
1 

5 
$7,  572 
$3,855 
$301 
$169 

$50 

$1,489 
$10 
$164 
$1,  534 
$1,  514 

4 

41 
181 

52 

1 
1 
$10,  000 
$10,  000 
$10,  000 

85.2 

14.8 

Cliurcli  edifices,  number        -       -.-  -  

Value  —  number  reporting,       _  .  -  

Amount  reported  _  - 

76.5 
76.5 

23.5 
23.5 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  .  

Average  value  per  church  

Debt  —  number  reporting  ,  

Amount  reported 

i" 
1 

$1,  344 
$750 
$144 
$25 

100.0 



Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Amount  reported             ,_..    »     _    ~  - 

84.9 
83.7 
67.6 
87,1 

15.1 
16.3 
32  4 
12  9 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries         _„             

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest   

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest   

$75 
$25 
$125 
$200 
$1,  344 

95.2 

4.8 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

Foreign  missions 

56.7 
88.5 

43.  3 
11.5 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.  _ 
Average  expenditure  per  church  

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Officers  and  teachers              -          - 

Scholars       -  

100.0 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

3  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

38 


LIFE  AND   ADVENT  UNION 


39 


Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Life  and  Advent  Union  for 
the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPAEATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Church.es  (local  organizations),  number       . 

6 

7 

13 

12 

Increase  i  over  preceding  census: 
Number          .                         

-1 

-6 

1 

Percent2  

Members,  number     _ 

352 

535 

658 

509 

Increase  *  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

—183 

—123 

149 

Percent 

-34.2 

—18.7 

29  3 

Average  membership  per  church  

59 

76 

51 

42 

Church  edifices,  number     

5 

7 

8 

6 

Value  —  number  reporting      

5 

7 

8 

6 

Amount  reported  -  

$42,  500 

$91,  000 

$41,  600 

$29,  799 

Average  value  per  church 

$8,  500 

$13,  000 

$5,  200 

$4,  967 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

3 

4 

3 

Amount  reported  

$5,  250 

$10,  500 

$12,  250 

$10,  300 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

6 

6 

11 

Amount  reported 

$8,  916 

$19,  861 

$8,  996 

Pastors'  salaries                         -  _ 

$4,  605 

All  other  salaries       __  

$445 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$194 

[     $13,  894 

$7,  529 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

$50 
$1,  564 
$35 

Foreign  missions 

$289 

I       $5,  967 

$1,  467 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  _ 

$1,  734 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$1,  486 

$3,  310 

$818 

Sunday  schools  : 

Churches  reporting,  number  -         

4 

7 

9 

7 

Officers  and  teachers 

41 

76 

73 

45 

Scholars                                                       

181 

344 

439 

259 

i  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  and  5  present  the  statistics  for  the  Life  and  Advent 
Union  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  member- 
ship of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory, 
membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives  for 
selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census 
years  1906  to  1936.  Table  5  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing 
separately  current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid 
disclosing  the  financial  statistics  of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation 
in  table  5  is  limited  to  the  State  of  Connecticut,  the  only  State  in  which  three  or 
more  churches  reported  expenditures. 


40 


CENSUS   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  O? 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY 
SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

S 

S 

o 

P) 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

8, 

M~* 

2 

03  23 

2 

PJ§ 

8? 

co  ,3 

K> 

d 

a 

03 

§ 

W  S 

"o 

S  o 

£ 

03 

3 

03 

'* 

2 

CD 

S 

S 

jrt 

"o 

o 

y 

0 

•S 

EH 

P 

rt 

EH 

t> 

W 

* 

* 

CQ 

rf 

o 

O 

CQ 

United  States  

6 

5 

1 

352 

300 

52 

105 

170 

77 

61.8 

4 

41 

181 

NEW  ENGLAND: 

Connecticut 

g 

3 

197 

!97 

52 

fiS 

77 

3 

35 

151 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 

New  York 

1 

1 

4S 

43 

1R 

95 

New  Jersey 

1 

1 

52 

59 

17 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Virginia 

1 

1 

.... 

60 

60 



18 

42 

1 

6 

30 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  BY  STATES 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926, 1916,  or  1906  J 


STATE 

NUMBER  OF  CHUECHES 

NUMBER    OF    MEMBERS 

1936 

19S6 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

United  States  ..      

6 

7 

13 

12 

352 

535 

658 

509 

Maine.  __  

3 
3 

7 

2 
4 

6 

37 

155 

466 

22 

128 

359 

Connecticut       ._      .    «.-  

3 
13 

3 

4 

197 

155 

231 
304 

Other  States 

i  Includes  1  church  each  in  the  States  of  New  York,  New  Jersey,  and  Virginia. 

TABLE  S. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting) 


EXPE 

NDITUJ 

^ES 

« 

, 

T-J 

•S 

S 

ja 

"S 

S 

.3 

*2 

o 

a 

w 

STATE 

il  number  of 

>  reporting 

1 

1 

M 

1 

nd  improve! 

on  church 
uding  intere 

ll 

Ss 

S.g 

ef  and  chari 

CO 

o 

1 

9 

§ 
a1 

fl 
"cfl 

4J 

1 

1 

« 

fl 

B 

•g-s 

CD 

1 

"2 

a 

S 

3 

3 

-S 

0 

ex 

9 

S 

* 

o 

W) 

,5 

o 

CO 

o 

o 

O 

EH 

<l 

« 

d) 

o 

fe 

United  States 

6 

6 

n,  916 

84,  805 

$445 

$194 

S50 

81,  564 

S35 

$289 

$1  734 

Connecticut  .. 

3 

3 

5,715 

3,100 

301 

169 

50 

961 

10 

164 

960 

Other  States  

3 

i  3 

3,201 

1,505 

144 

25 

603 

25 

125 

774 

i  Includes  1  church  each  in  the  States  of  New  York,  New  Jersey,  and  Virginia, 


LIFE   AND   ADVENT   UNION  41 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  doctrine  that  there  will  be  no  resurrection  of  the  wicked  was  preached  in 
1848  by  John  T.  Walsh,  then  an  associate  editor  of  the  Bible  Examiner,  an 
Adventist  periodical  published  in  New  York  City.  A  considerable  number  of 
Adveritists  joined  him  and  in  1863  the  Life  and  Advent  Union  was  organized  in 
Wilbraham,  Mass.,  and  the  Herald  of  Life  was  founded  as  the  denominational 
organ,  with  George  Storrs  as  its  first  editor.  The  number  of  churches  has  not 
been  large,  but  a  number  of  people  hold  the  views  of  the  Union  who  are  not 
enrolled  in  its  organized  churches.  Of  these  it  is  impossible  to  give  any  estimate. 

DOCTRINE 

In  matters  of  doctrine  they  are  in  accord  with  the  earlier  Adventists  except  in 
regard  to  the  resurrection  and  the  millennium.  They  hold  that  the  righteous 
dead  only  will  be  raised  and  that  eternal  life  is  bestowed  solely  at  the  second 
coming  of  Christ;  that  the  millennium,  the  one  thousand  years  of  Revelation  xx, 
had  its  fulfillment  in  the  past  and,  instead  of  being  a  time  of  peace  and  happiness, 
was  a  period  of  religious  persecution  and  suffering;  that  this  earth,  purified  by 
fire  and  renewed  in  beauty,  will  be  the  eternal  inheritance  and  dwelling  place  of 
God's  people,  in  which  the  wicked  dead  will  have  no  share  at  all,  their  sleep  being 
eternal.  They  believe  that  omens  of  the  near  approach  of  Christ  are  to  be  dis- 
cerned in  the  widespread  weakening  of  faith  in  an  inspired  Bible,  the  general 
condition  of  unrest  and  perplexity  among  the  nations,  and  kindred  developments 
along  many  lines. 

ORGANIZATION 

In  polity  the  Life  and  Advent  Union  is  distinctly  congregational;  associations 
are  for  fellowship  and  have  no  ecclesiastical  authority.  Home  and  foreign  mis- 
sionary work  and  the  publication  of  the  Herald  of  Life  are  under  the  control  of 
the  Governing  Council,  consisting  of  two  delegates  from  each  member  organiza- 
tion, and  an  Executive  Board,  elected  annually  by  the  Governing  Council.  Min- 
isters are  ordained,  either  at  their  own  request  or  on  request  of  a  church,  and  after 
proper  examination  by  a  committee  appointed  for  the  purpose. 

The  control  of  the  spiritual  interests  of  the  Life  and  Advent  Union  is  vested  in 
a  Ministerial  Board  consisting  of  five  members,  elected  annually  during  the  an- 
nual meeting  of  the  Life  and  Advent  Camp  Meeting  Association,  by  the  ordained 
ministers  of  the  Life  and  Advent  Union  in  good  and  regular  standing,  from 
among  their  members. 

WORK 

The  activities  of  the  Life  and  Advent  Union  consist  of  maintaining  mission 
work  in  China  and  aiding  weak  churches  in  this  country.  The  headquarters  of 
the  China  work  are  in  Ho-Hsien,  Anhwei,  the  work  being  carried  on  by  native 
pastors  and  teachers  under  the  supervision  of  an  American  missionary.  The 
amount  spent  for  mission  work  in  1936  was  approximately  $6,000. 

Two  camp  meetings  are  held  annually — -one  in  Maine  and  one  in  Connecticut 
(which  is  the  principal  one).  The  official  publication  of  the  denomination  is 
the  Herald  of  Life,  issued  biweekly  at  New  Britain,  Conn.  This  paper  has  a 
circulation  in  the  United  States  and  in  several  foreign  countries. 

i  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1920,  has  been  revised  by  H.  L.  Babcock,  editor  emeutus  of  the  Herald  of  Life,  New  Britain,  Conn., 
and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


CHURCH  OF  GOD  (OREGON,  ILL.) 

(FoKMERLy  REPORTED  AS  CHURCHES  OF  GOD  IN  CHRIST  JESUS) 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban -rural  classification, — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Church  of  God  (Oregon,  111.)  for  the  year  1936 
is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  comprises  those  persons  who  have  been 
admitted  to  the  church  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by  immersion. 


TABLE  l.~ 


-SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL  TERRI- 
TORY, 1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEECENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Church.es  (local  organizations),  number  

71 

4,  163 
59 

1,618 
2,545 
63.6 

114 
3,  151 
898 
3.5 

51 

48 
$137,  755 
$131,  105 
$6,  650 
$2,  870 

$8,  817 
33 

5 
4 
$4,  900 

65 
$36,  308 
$20,  649 
$1,  489 
$4,  103 

$2,094 

$5,  379 
$787 
$266 
$214 

$741 
$559 

60 
490 
2,967 

27 

1,767 
65 

669 
1,098 
60.9 

98 
1,564 
105 
5.9 

21 
19 
$76,  225 
$72,  575 
$3,  650 
$4,  012 
4 
$6,  717 
14 

3 
2 

$2,  500 

25 
$20,  427 
$10,  870 
$773 
$2,  553 

$1,  519 

$3,  184 
$539 
$104 
$189 
$290 
$406 
$817 

25 
228 
1,525 

44 

2,396 

54 

949 
1,447 
65  6 

16 
1,587 
793 
1.0 

30 

29 

$62,  530 
$58,  530 
$3,  000 
$2,  122 
2 
$2,  100 
19 

2 
2 

$2,400 

40 
$15,  881 
$9,  779 
$716 
$1,  550 

$575 

$2,  195 
$248 
$162 
$25 
$296 
$335 
$397 

35 
262 
1,442 

Members,  number    «. 

42.4 

57.6 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex* 
Male  

41  3 
43.1 

58.* 
56  9 

Female 

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

86.0 
49.6 
11.7 

14.0 
50.4 
88.3 

13  years  and  over 

Age  not  reported  «.         _  __ 

Percent  under  13  years  2  

Church  edifices,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported 

55  3 

55  4 
54  9 

44.7 
44.6 
45.1 

Constructed  prior  to  1936 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Avcr  age  value  per  church  

Debt  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported..            _  _ 

76.2 

23.8 

Number  reporting  "no  debt"  

Parsonages,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported 

51.0 

49.0 

Expenditures  : 

Churches  reporting,  number 

Amount  reported  _    _,  _ 

56  3 
52.6 
51  9 
62.2 

72.5 

59.2 
68.5 
39.1 
88.3 
49.5 
54.8 

43.7 
47.4 
48.1 
37.8 

27.5 

40.8 
31.5 
60.9 
11.7 
50.5 
45.2 

Pastors'  salaries  -  

All  other  salaries  __  __  

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest      

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc... 
Home  missions  _.  ,. 

Foreign  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribiition.. 
All  other  purposes  

Average  expenditure  per  church  __ 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  _. 

Officers  and  teachers 

46.5 
51.4 

53.5 
48.6 

Scholars  _ 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

4.9 


CHUBCH   OF   GOD    (OREGON,   ILL.) 


43 


Comparative  data,  1906-86. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  compari- 
son, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Church  of  God  (Oregon,  111.)  for 
the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number       _„  

71 

86 

87 

62 

Increase  *  over  preceding  census: 
Number                             -  - 

—  15 

—1 

25 

Percent2  _  _ 

M**  inters,  TUJTnhor 

4  163 

3  528 

3  457 

2  124 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
ISPumber      -    -        

635 

71 

1  333 

Percent 

18  0 

2  i 

62  8 

Average  membership  per  church                         -  - 

59 

41 

40 

34 

Church  edifices,  number      

51 

54 

52 

37 

Value  —  number  reporting   _    _    

48 

52 

52 

36 

Amount  reported 

$137  755 

$164  600 

$78  870 

$53  650 

Average  value  per  church         ..  

$?  870 

$3  165 

$1  517 

$1,  490 

Dgfot  —  number  reporting 

6 

7 

Amount  reported 

$8  817 

$13  700 

$1  290 

Parsonages,  number     __      -  ,  

5 

Value  —  number  reporting       -_  

4 

2 

3 

1 

Amount  reported 

$4  900 

$6  500 

$4  050 

$3  000 

Expenditures  : 

Churches  reporting,  number  _     

65 

63 

59 

Amount  reported 

$36  308 

$41  935 

$13  016 

Pastors'  salaries          

$20,  649 

All  other  salaries 

$1  489 

'       Repairs  and  improvements     _.              .     _. 

$4,  103 

>     $33,  587 

$11,  246 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest... 
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest- 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc  

$2,  094 
$5,  379 
$787 

Home  missions 

$266 

Foreign  missions 

$214 

>       $8,  348 

$1  770 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$586 

All  other  purposes  

$741 

Average  expenditure  per  church        .        _ 

$559 

$666 

$221 

Sunday  schools  : 

rjhnrfihfis  r6Pnrtifrgr  ntimbftf 

60 

42 

55 

30 

Officers  and  teachers             -  -      -  . 

490 

295 

358 

193 

Scholars  _.  

2,967 

1,877 

2,493 

895 

1 A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables.— Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Church  of  God, 
headquarters,  Oregon,  111.,  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the 
number  and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in 
urban  or  rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday 
schools.  Table  4  gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the 
churches  for  the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for 
1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table 
5  shows  the  value  of  church  edifices  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  such  property  for 
1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately 
current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing 
the  financial  statistics  of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables 
5  and  6  is  limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value 
and  expenditures. 


44 


CENSUS   OF   EELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  8. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 

AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY 

SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

3 
£ 

Urban 

2 
« 

3 
£ 

1 

P 

1 

tf 

2 

cd 
3 

,2 

£ 

Males  per  100 
females  1 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Officers  and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Now  York 

71 

27 

44 

4,163 

1,767 

2,396 

1,618 

2,545 

63,8 

60 

490 

2,967 
30 

642 
435 
532 
230 

158 
60 

1 

6 
9 
12 
2 

4 

1 

3 

4 
5 
1 

;o 

638 
506 
601 
206 

233 

200 
42 
177 
90 

60 
33 
360 

30 
92 
115 
121 

55 

97 

258 
39 
140 

70 

415 
221 
180 
106 

35 

249 
189 
239 

57 

94 
75 
20 
71 
36 

25 
7 
150 

15 
31 
35 
53 

19 
37 

113 
13 
55 

35 

389 
317 
362 
149 

139 
325 
22 
106 
54 

35 

26 
210 

15 
61 
80 
68 

36 
60 

145 
26 
85 

1 

6 
8 
11 
2 

3 

8 

7 

75 
76 
106 
23 

25 

17 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL* 
Ohio  

3 

5 
7 
1 

4 
8 
1 
3 
1 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
...... 

193 

285 
421 
100 

233 
200 
25 
134 
15 

60 
33 
360 

30 
32 

""l02" 

64.0 
59.6 
66.0 
38.3 

67.6 
60.0 

Indiana 

Illinois    ... 

Michigan  

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL- 
Minnesota 

Iowa 

8 

Missouri 

2 
4 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

17 
43 
75 

Nebraska 

67  0 

3 

1 

1 
1 
1 

2 
2 

1 
1 

1 
2 

2 

1 

2 

21 

11 

6 
6 
3 

14 
16 
14 
8 

7 
15 

17 
6. 
17 

63 
35 

15 

12 
50 

60 
140 
200 
25 

44 
70 

70 
21 

75 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

West  Virginia 

South  Carolina 

1 

71.4 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  _    _ 

2 

Louisiana  

2 
1 
3 

1 
2 

4 
1 
2 

1 
1 
] 

1 
1 

2 
1 
2 

60 
115 
19 

55 
35 

147 
39 
140 



Oklahoma 

Texas.         

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho 

77.9 

Arizona         -    ,  „„- 

1 
2 

62 
111 

PACIFIC: 
Washington  

Oregon 

California      .  







i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


CHURCH   OF  GOD    (OREGON,   ILL.) 


45 


TABLE   4. — NUMBER   AND    MEMBERSHIP    OF    CHURCHES,    1906    TO    1936,  AND 
MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936,  1926, 1916,  or  1906] 


GEOGEAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF  CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE, 
1936 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Under  13 
years 

13  years 
and  over 

11 
|1 

^  ^ 

Percent 
under  13  1 

United  States 

71 

86 

87 

62 

4,163 

3,528 

3,457 

2,124 

114 

3,151 

898 

3.5 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

6 
9 

12 
2 

4 
8 
2 
4 
2 

1 

6 
10 
11 
6 

4 
8 
4 
7 
1 

3 
3 

3 
1 

4 

3 

1 

11 

6 
11 
10 
8 

4 
13 
10 
9 

638 
506 
601 
206 

233 
200 

42 
177 
90 

60 

510 
412 
380 
202 

228 
144 
120 
258 
26 

97 
81 

155 
14 
117 

167 
27 

590 

372 
663 
276 
338 

175 
696 
274 
328 

1 
40 
17 
3 

5 

637 
318 
524 
203 

228 
200 

.2 
11.2 
3  1 
1.5 

2.1 

Indiana..  . 

148 
60 

Illinois  

Michigan 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota  

Iowa  

9 
2 
8 
1 

4 
4 

10 

7 

6 
2 
4 
3 

1 

208 
81 
164 
15 

102 
153 

499 
281 

145 
47 
96 
48 

50 

Missouri 



17 
68 
90 

25 
109 

Nebraska  

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia  

60 

North  Carolina  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas.-  

2 
1 
3 

4 
1 

210 

30 
115 
121 

258 
39 

847 

30 
100 
36 

147 
39 

454 

Oklahoma 

2 

33 

15 

"85" 
111 

13.0 

Texas 

PACIFIC- 
Washington  

1 
1 

5 

2 
3 

3 

40 
30 

235 

56 
62 

114 



Oregon 

Other  States 

33 

360 

6.8 

1  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

2  Includes  2  churches  in  each  of  the  following  States— Louisiana,  Arizona,  and  California;  and  1  in  each  of 
the  following— New  York,  West  Virginia,  South  Carolina,  and  Idaho. 

TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHTTKCHES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH  DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Number 
of  church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

71 

51 

48 

$137,  755 

35,  600 
14,  500 
24,  100 

6,400 
5,800 
4,130 

7,500 
39,  725 

6 

$8,  817 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

6 
9 
12 

4 
8 
4 

4 
24 

5 

7 
8 

4 
3 
3 

3 

18 

5 
6 
7 

4 
3 
3 

3 

U7 

1 

4,400 

Indiana 

Illinois  

2 

3,300 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa 

1 

166 

Nebraska 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

Other  States  

2 

1,017 

'  Includes  2  churches  in  each  of  the  following  States— Michigan,  Kansas,  Louisiana,  and  California;  and 
1  in  each  of  the  following— New  York,  Missouri,  Virginia,  South  Carolina,  Arkansas,  Oklahoma,  Texas, 
Idaho,  and  Arizona. 


46 


CENSUS   OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


1 

EXPENDITURES 

£ 

W) 

C 

s 

o  fl 

w  ^ 

S3  S 

fl 

^ 

» 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

JS 

I 

a 

fl 

S 

cs 

g 

CJ 

a 

9  a 

a  o 

II 

a 

S 

fl 

o 

GJ 
"^  »S 

1 

s 

0 

w 

« 

"9 

2  ^-w 

S          -WS 

CD  % 

S3 

s 

d 

a 

•a 

1 

E 

j§ 

HP 

«*?§ 

°ls 

€ 

ri 

d 

W) 

& 

1 

3 

O 

J3 

1 

03 

"o 

ft 

QJ 

||f 

Isl 

1 

O 

1 

o 

o 

& 

0 

•4 

PS 

^ 

o 

w 

fc 

E-i 

^ 

United  States  ... 

71 

65 

$36  308 

$20  649 

$1  489 

$4  103 

$2  094 

$5  379 

HH7 

$flflfl 

$9il4 

$586 

$741 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL- 

==: 

Ohio  

6 

6 

9  575 

5  075 

477 

1  979 

175 

1  587 

232 

50 

Indiana 

9 

9 

2  4,31 

1  487 

167 

150 

24 

433 

30 

60 

45 

35 

Illinois 

12 

12 

6  334 

3  675 

236 

402 

620 

793 

114 

rs 

5 

211 

220 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

Minnesota  

4 

4 

1  908 

1  475 

75 

50 

157 

5 

7*? 

35 

30 

Iowa  

8 

8 

1,085 

960 

75 

50 

Nebraska  

4 

870 

300 

15 

415 

73 

K, 

16 

46 

PACIFIC: 

Washington 

4 

4 

1  330 

720 

96 

83 

269 

17 

50 

25 

56 

Other  States 

24 

119 

12,  769 

6,957 

423 

1,024 

1,200 

2,017 

364 

83 

149 

254 

298 

i  Includes  2  churches  in  each  of  the  following  States— Michigan,  Kansas,  Arkansas,  Louisiana,  Texas, 
Arizona,  and  California,  and  1  in  each  of  the  following— New  York,  Virginia,  West  Virginia,  Oklahoma, 
and  Idaho. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

With,  the  development  of  church  life  independent  of  denominational  organiza- 
tions, many  churches  throughout  the  country  were  organized  under  various 
names,  such  as  Church  of  the  Blessed  Hope,  Brethren  of  the  Abrahamic  Faith, 
Restitutionists,  Restitution  Church,  Church  of  God,  and  Age  to  Come  Adventists. 
Some  were  loosely  affiliated  but  refused  to  be  identified  with  any  denomination, 
although,  in  general,  they  were  Adventist  in  their  doctrine.  In  November  1888 
representatives  from  a  number  of  such  churches  met  in  Philadelphia  and  organ- 
ized the  association  known  as  Churches  of  God  in  Christ  Jesus,  which  is  in 
general  accord  with  the  Adventist  bodies  and  is  classed  with  them,  although 
the  term  "Adventist"  does  not  appear  in  its  title. 

In  August  1921  a  General  Conference  was  organized  at  Waterloo,  Iowa. 
Headquarters  were  located  at  Oregon,  111.,  at  which  place  are  maintained  the 
general  offices. 

DOCTRINE 

The  churches  belonging  to  this  association  have  no  creed  but  the  Bible.  The 
members,  however,  believe: 

1.  That  there  is  one  God,  the  supreme  creator  and  controller  of  all  things,  who 
is  a  lovable,  loving,  and  approachable  Father,  and  a  re  warder  of  all  who  diligently 
seek  Him  and  keep  His  commandments. 

2.  That  the  Lord  Jesus  Christ,  the  Son  of  God,  came  into  existence  as  set 
forth  in  the  Gospels  and  gave  His  life  as  a  sacrificial  offering  for  our  sins;  that 
those  who  believe  in  Him  and  obey  His  teachings  may  through  Him  have  their 
sins  forgiven;  that  Christ  arose  from  the  dead  on  the  third  day  and,  after  meet- 
ing with  His  disciples  on  several  occasions,  was  taken  up  into  heaven,  there  to 
remain  with  God  until  certain  things  foretold  by  the  prophets  shall  have  been 
accomplished. 

i  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  Sydney  E.  Magaw,  secretary  and  editor,  National  Bible  Institution, 
Oregon,  111.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


CHURCH    OF   GOD     (OREGON,    ILL.)  47 

3.  That  Christ  will  come  again  personally  (a)  to  give  immortal  life  to  those 
who  have  been  faithful,  raising  the  dead  and  changing  the  living;  (6)  to  establish 
the  kingdom  of  God  on  earth,  which,  with  its  capital  city  at  Jerusalem,  will  be 
gradually  extended  until  all  nations  and  races  of  mankind  are  brought  under 
His  sovereignty;  and  to  restore  to  its  ancient  heritage  and  God's  favor  the 
Israelitish  nation,  which  will  then  be  the  most  favored  nation  in  this  kingdom; 
(c)  to  reward  the  immortal  saints  as  joint  heirs  with  Christ,  according  to  their 
works,  giving  to  each  a  position  of  honor  and  trust  as  joint  ruler  with  Christ  in 
the  kingdom  of  God;  (d)  to  mete  out  to  the  ungodly  "the  wages  of  sin/'  even  the 
second  death. 

4.  That   obedience   to   the   commandments   of   God   is   obligatory   upon  all 
Christians,  the  first  act  necessary  being  baptism  for  the  remission  of  sins. 

5.  That  those  who  believe  the  gospel  message,  repent  of  their  sins,  and  are 
baptized,  have  entered  into  covenant  relationship  with  God,  their  part  of  the 
covenant  being  that  they  will  live  useful  lives  of  faith  and  good  works,  God's 
part  being  that  if  they  remain  faithful  unto  the  end  He  will  give  them  eternal 
life  and  positions  of  honor  and  trust  in  His  kingdom. 

Candidates  for  admission  into  the  churches  are  required  to  confess  faith  in 
God.  and  in  the  promises  of  the  gospel;  to  accept  Jesus  Christ  as  their  Lord, 
Saviour,  and  King;  and  to  covenant  to  live  Christian  lives.  On  this  confession 
candidates  are  baptized  by  immersion. 

ORGANIZATION 

In  polity  the  churches  are  congregational.  For  fellowship  and  general  work 
they  gather  in  State  and  district  conferences,  which,  however,  exercise  no  authority 
over  the  individual  churches,  being  wholly  advisory,  educational,  and  evangelistic 
in  character.  Each  local  church  adapts  its  organization  to  circumstances.  In 
some  cases  they  have  pastors,  in  others  the  services  are  conducted  by  elders 
or  presidents.  The  term  "minister,"  as  understood  among  them,  is  applied  to  the 
person  in  spiritual  charge  of  the  congregation,  or  who  preaches  the  gospel.  There 
is  no  formal  method  of  ordination.  Ministers  are  authorized  by  the  several 
State  conferences,  who,  on  application,  are,  after  confirmation  as  to  character, 
recognized  by  the  General  Conference.  The  general  attitude  toward  other 
denominations  is  liberal,  the  invitation  to  the  communion  service  being  extended 
to  all  Christians,  leaving  each  individual  to  be  his  own  judge  as  to  participation. 

WORK 

The  home  mission  work  of  the  churches  is  conducted  by  a  number  of  evangelists, 
who  are  supported  by  voluntary  contributions.  A  Bible  Training  School  is 
maintained  at  Oregon,  111.,  for  those  who  wish  to  qualify  for  the  ministry  or  for 
other  active  church  work.  In  addition  to  this,  literature,  quarterly  and  annual 
gatherings,  and  Bible  classes  in  various  centers  are  used  as  mediums  for  educa- 
tional work.  There  is  a  young  people's  society,  called  the  Bereans,  which  has  a 
national  organization,  with  affiliated  State  organizations  and  local  societies. 
There  are  about  25  of  these  local  societies  with  about  500  members.  Sunday 
schools,  ladies'  aid  societies,  and  similar  educational  and  charitable  institutions 
are  also  conducted  as  a  part  of  the  general  work  of  the  churches. 

In  the  Golden  Rule  Home,  at  Oregon,  111.,  provision  is  made  to  care  for  aged 
persons  and  others  who  may  need  such  care. 

Denominational  printing  is  done  by  the  National  Bible  Institution,  Oregon,  111. 


PRIMITIVE  ADVENT  CHRISTIAN  CHURCH 


STATISTICS 

A  summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Primitive  Advent  Christian  Church  for  the 
year  1936  is  presented,  which  shows  the  distribution  of  these  data  between  urban 
and  rural  territory. 

No  parsonages  were  reported.  All  churches  are  reported  from  the  State  of 
West  Virginia. 

The  Primitive  Advent  Christian  Church  is  a  recent  development  from  the 
Advent  Christian  Church.  As  this  denomination  was  reported  for  the  first  time 
in  1936,  no  comparative  figures  are  available.  This  body  failed  to  furnish  its 
history,  doctrine,  or  the  facts  of  organization. 

A  SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL  TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

14 

538 
38 

202 
336 
60.1 

2 

536 
0.4 

13 
13 
$15,  300 
$14,  100 
$1,  200 
$1,  177 
2 
$543 
2 

14 
$1,  637 
$716 
$108 
$556 

$135 

$32 
$9 
$37 

$44 
$117 

3 

20 
195 

1 

70 
70 

27 
43 
(2) 

13 

468 
36 

175 
293 
59.  7 

2 

466 
0.4 

12 
12 
$13,  700 
$12,  500 
$1,  200 
$1,  142 
1 
$143 
2 

13 
$1,  393 

$611 
$84 
$556 

$35 

$17 
$9 
$37 
$44 
$107 

2 
13 
139 

Members,  number  

13.0 

87.0 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex 
Male  _  

13.4 

12.8 

86.6 

87.2 

Female 

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
XTnder  13  years 

13  years  and  over 

70 

13.1 

86.9 

Percent  under  13  years 

Church,  edifices,  number 

1 

1 

$1,  600 
$1,  600 

Valuft  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

10.5 
11.3 

89.5 
88  7 
100.0 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church 

$1,  600 
1 

$400 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

73.7 

26  3 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Expenditures  : 

Churches  reporting,  number 

1 
$244 
$105 
$24 

Amount  reported.  

14  9 
14.7 
22.2 

85  1 
85  3 
77  8 
100.  0 

25  9 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries 

Hepairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest 

$100 

$15 

74.1 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest 

Home  missions    _.._. 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.. 
All  other  purposes 

Average  expenditure  per  church         

$244 

1 
7 
56 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers    

Scholars             _              

28.7 

71.3 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

48 


AFRICAN  ORTHODOX  CHURCH 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  African  Orthodox  Church  for  the  year  1936  is 
presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory.  These  statistics  were  compiled  from  schedules  sent 
directly  to  the  Bureau  by  the  pastor  or  clerk  of  the  individual  churches  and  the 
data  relate  to  these  churches  only. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  includes  all  baptized  persons,  infants  as 
well  as  adults. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  EURAL  TER- 
RITORY, 1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEECENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Church.es  (local  organizations),  number 

13 

1,952 
150 

789 
1,163 
67.8 

367 
1,527 
58 
19.4 

4 
4 
$36,  204 
$33,  654 
$2,  550 
$9,  051 
3 
$30,913 

1 

12 
$12,  621 
$2,807 
$1,  016 
$790 
$1,336 
$5,  167 
$398 
$239 
$156 
$308 
$404 
$1,  052 

12 

89 
747 

11 

1,907 
173 

762 
1,145 
66.6 

365 
1,484 
58 
19.7 

3 
3 

$35,300 
$33,  000 
$2,300 
$11,767 
3 
$30,913 

1 

11 
$12,478 
$2,807 
$1,  016 
$790 
$1,336 
$5,  167 
$365 
$190 
$156 
$291 
$360 
$1,  134 

10 
80 
701 

2 

45 
23 

27 

18 
(2) 

2 
43 

Members,  number  .      

97.7 

2.3 

Average  membership  per  church    

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

96.6 
98.5 

3.4 
1.5 

Female 

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

99.5 
97.2 

.5 
2.8 

13  years  and  over  _  

Age  not  reported       

Percent  under  13  years3..  .       

0) 

1 
1 

$904 
$654 
$250 
$904 

OhliroK  eclffioes,  TiUTnber                                          ,„,,... 

Value—  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  _ 

97.5 
98.1 
90.2 

2.5 
1.9 
9.8 

Constructed  prior  to  1936 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936  

Average  value  per  church  .  

Debt-  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported. 



100.0 



Parsonages,  number    _  _  _-  _     .     

Expenditures  : 

Churchps  reporting,  number 

1 
$143 

Amount  reported 

98.9 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

1.1 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

100.0 

$3§" 
$49 

"$17" 
$44 
$143 

2 
9 
46 

100.0 
91.7 
79.5 
100.0 
94.5 
89.1 

8~3 
20.5 

Foreign  missions               _              

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

6.5 
10.9 

All  other  purposes 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

93.8 

6.2 

*  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

2  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

s  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


50 


CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


Comparative  data,  1936  and  1926, — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for 
comparison,  a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  African  Orthodox 
Church  for  the  census  years  1936  and  1926. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1936  AND  1926 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

ITEM 

1936 

1936 

Churclies  (local  organizations), 
number        _.  

13 

13 

Expenditures: 
Churches  reporting,  number. 

12 

13 

Amount  reported  ._ 

$12,  621 

$19,  368 

Members,  number 

1,952 

1,  568 

Pastors'  salaries  

$2,  807 

Incrssso  over  pr6C6dins'  C6n~ 

All  other  salaries 

$1  010 

sus: 
Number           _-       -  .. 

384 

Repairs   and   improve- 
ments-    -.    _-_ 

$790 

Percent 

24.5 

Paymenton  church  debt, 

>$18,211 

Avftrag'R    TT)6Tnhp>,rsWp    pfiT 

excluding  interest  

$1,  33C 

church 

150 

121 

All   other    current   ex- 

Church edifices,  number 

4 

penses,  including  in- 
terest  -              . 

$5,  167 

Value  —  number  reporting 

4 

Local  relief  and  charity, 

Amount  reported 

$36  204 

Red  Cross,  etc.   

$398 

Average  value  per 

Home  missions-       ...  ... 

$239 

church 

$9,  051 

Foreign  missions  .,  

$156 

Debt  —  number  reporting  . 

3 

To  general  headquarters 

$1,  157 

Amount  ffipnrt.fid 

$30  913 

for  distribution 

$308 

All  other  purposes 

$404 

Parsonages,  number 

1 

Average    expenditure    per 

church 

$1,  052 

$1,  490 

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  number. 
Officers  and  teachers 

12 
89 

11 
49 

Scholars 

747 

445 

State  tables, — Tables  3,  4,  and  5  present  the  statistics  for  the  African  Orthodox 
Church  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  member- 
ship of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  terri- 
tory, membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives 
the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  census  years  1936  and  1926, 
together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and 
"13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expendi- 
tures, showing  separately  current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY 
SEX 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

g 

i 

"C 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

r"1   OT 

**  bjd 

S  ^ 

W  H 

<u 

a 

.-t 

P) 

,-» 

'i 

o3  i 

B'w 

03 

£ 

•e 

P? 

o 

•s 

P 

1 

M 

i 

3" 

A 

O 

O 

•s 

CO 

United  States 

1ft 

11 

9 

1,952 

1,907 

45 

789 

1  163 

67.8 

1^ 

R9 

747 

NEW  ENGLAND 

Massachusetts     _  _  

1 

i 

115 

115 

56 

59 

(i) 

1 

fi 

32 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 

New  York     --    ~-  -    ,.  ,- 

7 

7 

1,640 

1,640 

644 

996 

64.7 

7 

56 

545 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Florida 

5 

3 

2 

197 

152 

45 

89 

108 

82.4 

4 

27 

170 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


AFRICAN   ORTHODOX   CHURCH 


51 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND   MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,    1936  AND   1926,   AND 
MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


STATE 

NXTMBEE  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  FT  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1936 

1936 

1936 

Under 
13  years 

13  years 
and 
over 

Age  not 
re- 
ported 

Percent 

under 
13  i 

United  States  

13 
1 

13 

1,952 

1,568 

367 

1,527 
__. 

58 

19.4 

Massachusetts  

3 
1 

115 

378 
55 
916 
46 
173 

21 

18.3 

Connecticut  .  -  -- 

New  York        

7 

6 
1 

1,640 

329 

1,311 

20.1 

Illinois 

Florida    -  „ 

5 

2 

197 

17 

122 

58 

12.2 

i  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

TABLE  5. — CHTJRCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 


,0 

EXPENDITURES 

JI 

, 

fl  h 

<8" 

>> 

B 

o 

0 

rt  d 

p  "** 

n? 

t-i 

0 

a 

t 

•S'S 

0.2 

•s 

H 

§ 

$ 

STATE 

8 

M 

-t-3 

& 

•c 

^+s 

^'fl 

"fl 

ri 

o 

*§ 

§, 

f 

a 

o  S 

p  "* 

0 

I 

(H 

M 

0 

"3 

g 

§s 

n1 

0 

M 

H 

« 

a 

PJ 

i 

E 

1 

B§ 

£ 

a 

d 

s 

1 

j3 

3 

3 

•2 

0 

Si"®  t? 

^  d 

03 

g 

as 

bo 

o 

o 

.CI 

oj^3  <» 

o 

o 

0 

B 

PH 

4 

tf 

O 

^ 

M 

fr 

EH 

^ 

United  States  

13 

12 

$12,  821 

$2,  807 

$1,  016 

S790 

81,  336 

$5,  187 

$398 

$239 

$156 

$308 

$404 

Massachusetts  

1 

7 

1 

7 

}i  11,  242 

2,300 

926 

780 

1,000 

5,158 

350 

178 

64 

201 

285 

New  York 

Florida  

5 

4 

1,379 

507 

90 

10 

336 

9 

48 

61 

92 

107 

119 

1  Amount  for  Massachusetts  combined  with  figures  for  New  York,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial 
statistics  of  any  individual  church. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  African  Orthodox  Church  came  into  existence  in  1921,  after  a  preliminary 
period  of  preparation.  The  Reverend  Dr.  George  Alexander  McGuire,  for  many 
years  a  priest  in  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church,  believing  that  Negro  Epis- 
copalians should  conduct  and  control  their  own  religious  organization,  as  their 
Methodist  and  Baptist  brethren  have  done  for  over  a  century,  withdrew  from  the 
Anglican  communion  in  1919  and  established  a  number  of  congregations  in  the 
United  States,  Canada,  and  Cuba,  which  he  designated  "Independent  Epis- 
copal." On  September  2,  1921,  the  first  General  Synod  was  convened  in  the 
city  of  New  York  for  the  purpose  of  organizing  a  branch  of  the  Holy  Catholic 
Church  which  should  be  governed  by  persons  of  African  descent  and  should  gather 
in  churchmen  of  this  particular  race  in  both  hemispheres,  yet  not  refuse  persons 
of  other  racial  groups  who  might  voluntarily  seek  to  enter  its  membership  or 
receive  its  sacraments.  At  this  synod  the  name  "African  Orthodox"  was 
chosen  as  the  distinctive  title  of  the  new  church,  and  the  organizer,  the  Rev- 
erend Dr.  ^McGuire,  was  unanimously  elected  as  its  first  bishop,  receiving  the 
consecration  3  weeks  later  from  Archbishop  Vilatte,  whose  episcopate  had  been 
derived  from  the  West  Syrian  Jacobite  Church  of  Antioch  by  special  mandate  of 

i  No  revision  of  the  history,  doctrine,  or  organization  was  furnished  by  this  body  for  1936,  hence  this  state- 
ment is  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious  B  odies,  1926.  No  data  are  available 
for  "Work"  in  1936. 


52  CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

the  patriarch,  Peter  Ignatius  III.  Thus  the  African  Orthodox  Church  derived 
its  apostolic  succession  and  became  episcopal  in  government  and  polity;  and 
while  it  is  autonomous  and  independent,  it  aspires  to  be  recognized  as  an  integral 
portion  of  the  Holy  Catholic  and  Apostolic  Church. 

DOCTRINE 

The  African  Orthodox  Church  accepts  the  Holy  Scriptures,  as  well  as  the 
Holy  Tradition,  as  the  source  of  divine  truth;  it  accepts  the  Nicene  Creed, 
without  the  "filioque"  interpolation,  as  of  obligation,  but  believes  also  in  the 
symbols  known  as  the  Apostles'  Creed  and  the  Creed  of  St.  Athanasius.  It 
accepts  the  dogmatic  decrees  of  the  Seven  Ecumenical  Councils  held  between  the 
fourth  and  the  eighth  centuries.  It  receives  as  a  portion  of  the  original  deposit 
of  faith  the  Seven  Sacraments.  It  holds  that  the  Eucharist  is  both  a  sacrament 
and  a  sacrifice  offered  for  the  living  and  the  dead.  Marriage  being  one  of  the 
sacraments,  it  holds  that  there  should  be  no  dissolution  of  its  bonds  except  for 
the  cause  of  adultery  or  malicious  desertion,  and  no  priest  may  marry  a  divorced 
person  unless  he  or  she  be  the  innocent  party  in  a  divorce  granted  by  a  proper 
court  for  the  causes  mentioned,  and  then  only  by  permission  of  his  bishop  in 
each  such  case  of  remarriage. 

The  denomination  has  set  forth  its  own  sacred  liturgy,  with  other  rites  and 
ceremonies.  Generally  speaking,  it  follows  the  Western  rite  and  is  a  combina- 
tion of  Anglican,  Roman,  and,  in  a  few  instances,  Greek  Orthodox  formularies, 
prepared  with  the  special  purpose  of  making  an  appeal  to  Negro  Episcopalians 
and  Roman  Catholics.  The  mass  is  the  chief  service  each  Sunday,  and  in  the 
bestowing  of  holy  orders  the  Roman  forms  of  ordination  and  consecration  are 
followed.  The  vestments  used  in  worship  are  those  prescribed  by  the  Western 
rite  and  the  hymnal  that  which  is  known  as  Hymns  Ancient  and  Modern. 

Membership  is  counted  as  in  the  Roman  Catholic  Church,  not  by  communi- 
cants, but  by  the  persons  baptized. 

ORGANIZATION 

The  polity  of  the  African  Orthodox  Church  conforms  to  that  of  all  churches 
which  regard  the  episcopacy  as  the  central  source  of  authority  in  matters  spiritual 
and  temporal.  The  bishop  is  the  head  of  his  diocese  or  jurisdiction,  functioning 
also  as  president  of  his  diocesan  synod.  Groups  of  dioceses  form  a  province, 
over  each  of  which  there  is  an  archbishop  and  primate,  who  presides  over  the 
provincial  synod.  At  the  head  of  the  entire  church,  including  all  provinces,  is 
the  patriarch,  who  presides  over  the  Pan-African  Conclave  of  Archbishops  and 
Bishops  and  is  the  acknowledged  ruler  of  the  African  Orthodox  Church  of  the 
world.  At  present  there  is  an  American  province  extending  through  Canada, 
the  United  States,  and  Latin  America;  and  an  African  province  extending  through 
the  Union  of  South  Africa,  each  with  its  own  archbishop  and  primate. 


AMERICAN  ETHICAL  UNION 

(SOCIETIES  FOB  ETHICAL  CTJLTTJEE) 


STATISTICS 

The  data  given  for  1936  represent  seven  active  societies  of  the  American  Ethical 
Union,  all  reported  as  being  in  urban  territory.  The  classification  of  membership 
by  age  was  reported  by  all  of  the  seven  societies,  none  of  which  reported  any 
members  under  13  years  of  age.  These  statistics  were  compiled  from  schedules 
sent  directly  to  the  Bureau  by  the  leader  or  clerk  of  the  individual  societies  and 
the  data  relate  to  these  societies  only. 

Membership  in  the  Ethical  Societies  is  conferred  upon  those  who  express  a 
sympathy  with  the  purpose  of  the  societies  and  a  desire  to  affiliate  with  others 
in  advancing  the  aims  and  purposes  of  the  Ethical  Movement. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  1  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  this  organization  for  the  census 
years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  1. — COMPAEATIVE  SUMMARY,   1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Societies  (local  organizations),  number  

7 

6 

5 

5 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
Number  _     „    _           _    _    .    _ 

1 

1 

Percent  * 

Members,  number  

2,659 

3,801 

2,850 

2,040 

Increase  2  over  preceding  census: 
Number  

—  1,  142 

951 

810 

Percent                               _ 

—30.0 

33.4 

39  7 

Average  membership  per  society 

380 

634 

570 

408 

Society  buildings,  number  

3 

5 

Value  —  number  reporting 

3 

5 

Amount  reported  

$925,  750 

$1,  157,  821 

Average  value  per  society 

$308,  583 

$231,  564 

Debt  —  number  reporting  

2 

2 

Amount  reported            _    __    _ 

$288,  000 

$212,  000 

Expenditures  : 
Societies  reporting,  number 

6 

6 

5 

Amount  reported  

$227,  789 

$256,  141 

$80,  661 

Leaders'  salaries     .            ..         .       ._    _ 

$38.  722 

All  other  salaries 

$33,  894 

Eepairs  and  improvements  

$3,  589 

41  £*>  QAO 

Gar  onn 

Payment  on  society  building  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest 

$27,  000 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  
Ijocal  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

$72,  928 
$47,  728 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$2  213 

I    $103,  239 

$6  193 

All  other  purposes 

$1,  715 

Not  classified    

$8  568 

Average  expenditure  per  society 

$37,  965 

$42,  690 

$16,  132 

Sunday  schools  : 
Pocfettes  ropo^tiTig,  nmriher 

5 

5 

4 

5 

Officers  and  teachers-.    _  __  __    

44 

47 

45 

64 

Scholars                                              *. 

424 

416 

436 

466 

i  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


2  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 
53 


54 


CENSUS   OF  EELIGIOUS  BODIES,    1936 


State  tables. — Tables  2  and  3  present  the  statistics  for  the  American  Ethical 
Union  by  States.  Table  2  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  member- 
ship of  the  societies,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools. 
Table  3  gives  the  number  and  membership  of  the  societies  for  the  four  census 
years  1906  to  1936. 

TABLE  2. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  SOCIETIES,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND 
SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber of 
soci- 
eties 

Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

Male 

Female 

Males 
per  100 
females 

Soci- 
eties 
report- 
ing 

Offi- 
cers 
and 
teach- 
ers 

Schol- 
ars 

United  States  

7 

2,659 

1,196 

1,463 

81.7 

5 

44 

424 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Massachusetts                       j. 

1 

3 
1 

1 
1 

159 

1,531 
347 

255 
367 

65 

762 
129 

100 
140 

94 

769 
218 

155 
227 

(0 

99.1 
59.2 

64.5 
61.7 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

3 
1 

25 
5 

257 
42 

Pennsylvania                        -  - 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Illinois 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri 

1 

14 

125 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 
TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  SOCIETIES  BY  STATES,  1906  TO  1936 


STATE 

NUMBER  OF  SOCIETIES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

United  States     

7 

6 

5 

5 

2,659 

3,801 

2,850 

2,040 

Massachusetts 

1 
3 
1 

1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

159 
1,531 
347 
255 
367 

209 
1,893 
721 
550 
428 

New  York...             

2 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 

1,450 
504 
329 
567 

1,265 
198 
217 
360 

Pennsylvania 

Illinois. 

Missouri 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 
HISTORY 

The  Ethical  Movement  was  inaugurated  by  the  founding  of  the  New  York 
Society  for  Ethical  Culture  by  Dr.  Felix  Adler  in  1876.  Ethical  societies  have 
since  been  formed  in  Chicago,  Philadelphia,  St.  Louis,  Brooklyn,  Boston,  and 
Westchester,  and  the  movement  has  extended  also  to  other  countries,  including 
England,  Germany,  France,  Austria,  Switzerland,  and  Japan.  Two  federations 
have  been  formed — the  American  Ethical  Union,  organized  in  1886,  and  the 
International  Ethical  Union,  organized  in  1896. 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

The  Ethical  Movement  is  linked  with  man's  religious  tradition  and  with  the 
insights  and  wisdom  of  philosophy.  With  reverence  for  the  best  in  traditional 
faiths  it  attempts  to  reinterpret  ethical  teachings  so  as  to  deepen  man's  spiritual 

1  This  statement,  which  differs  somewhat  from  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Keport  on  Religious  Bodies, 
1926,  has  been  revised  by  Algernon  D.  Black,  American  Ethical  Union,  New  York  City,  and  approved 
by  him  in  its  present  form. 


AMERICAN  ETHICAL  UNION  55 

life  today.  "Ethical"  is  to  be  interpreted  as  that  aspect  of  self  which  is  sensitive 
to  and  creative  in  human  relationships.  In  its  broadest  and  deepest  sense  it  is 
an  emphasis  on  the  fulfillment  of  man's  possibilities.  It  calls  for  the  development 
of  man's  aesthetic  and  scientific  powers,  but  above  all  it  stresses  the  values  to  be 
fulfilled  through  better  human  relationships.  It  is  the  purpose  of  the  Ethical 
Movement  to  make  men  more  aware  of  the  intrinsic  worth  of  human  personality, 
of  the  uniqueness  of  every  human  being,  of  the  interpenetration  of  one  life  with 
another,  and  of  the  possibilities  of  creative  relationships  among  men.  Through 
developing  conscience  and  the  sense  of  responsibility  for  better  relations  in  friend- 
ship, in  family,  in  industry,  and  among  different  nations  and  cultures,  the  Ethical 
Movement  fulfills  man's  need  for  a  sense  of  purpose,  direction,  and  meaning. 
This  is  the  purpose  of  the  plan  of  ethical  education  which  begins  with  the  Sunday 
school  and  continues  through  youth  and  adulthood  to  old  age. 

The  societies  have  no  formal  expression  of  doctrine.  Their  purpose,  as 
expressed  by  the  constitution  of  the  American  Ethical  Union,  is  "to  assert  the 
supreme  importance  of  the  ethical  factor  in  all  the  relations  of  life."  The  further- 
ance of  personal  and  social  relationships  which  will  promote  man's  ethical  possi- 
bilities takes  the  place  of  formal  creeds;  this  very  striving  for  moral  life  becomes 
itself  a  "consecrating  influence." 

While  there  are  no  fixed  rites  or  ceremonies,  the  Sunday  meetings  of  the  Society 
are  regarded  by  most  of  the  members  as  religious  meetings.  Music,  readings, 
and  addresses  by  leaders  of  the  Society  constitute  an  inspirational  service.  The 
leaders,  who  take  the  place  of  ministers,  officiate  at  the  funerals  of  members  of  the 
societies,  offer  counsel  in  moral  difficulty,  name  children,  and  perform  marriage 
ceremonies  under  the  laws  of  the  States,  and  in  the  case  of  New  York  City  and 
Brooklyn  by  special  act  of  the  legislature. 

The  American  Ethical  Union,  composed  of  the  seven  American  societies  listed, 
holds  an  annual  assembly  to  which  the  several  societies  send  delegates  in  propor- 
tion to  their  numbers.  In  the  interval  between  assemblies  the  business  of  the 
Union  is  conducted  by  an  executive  committee.  However,  each  society  is 
autonomous  in  government. 

WORK 

In  each  of  the  Ethical  societies  there  are  Sunday  schools  for  the  moral  instruc- 
tion of  children,  and  study  and  fellowship  groups  for  young  people  and  adults. 
Effort  is  made  to  develop  a  sense  of  the  fellowship  and  community  of  the  members 
in  one  another. 

Each  of  the  societies  has  undertaken  and  carries  on  a  variety  of  activities — 
educational,  philanthropic,  and  social — emphasizing  the  ethical  needs  and  possi- 
bilities of  man.  These  include  neighborhood  houses  for  work  in  neglected  areas. 
The  New  York  Society  is  to  be  credited  with  the  inception  of  settlement  house 
work  in  this  country.  Neighborhood  houses  initiated  by  the  societies  are  in 
operation  in  New  York,  Chicago,  Philadelphia,  and  St.  Louis.  Free  kinder- 
gartens in  the  New  York  schools,  the  visiting  nurse  movement  (also  started  by  the 
Henry  Street  Settlement),  the  Child  Study  Movement,  and  the  movement  for  the 
abolition  of  child  labor  were  also  introduced  by  the  Society.  Some  of  the  first 
model  tenements,  the  impulse  to  the  first  tenement  house  law  in  New  York  City, 
and  much  of  recent  activity  on  behalf  of  housing  has  been  stimulated  by  members 
of  the  New  York  Society.  The  Chicago  Society  started  the  first  public  legal  aid 
bureau  and  led  to  the  spread  of  this  kind  of  institution. 

The  Society  has  also  established  the  Ethical  Culture  schools  for  advanced 
experimental  work  in  elementary  and  high  school  education.  The  most  recent 
development  of  the  Ethical  Culture  school  system  is  the  Meldston  School  at 
Eiverdale,  New  York  City.  This  undertaking  is  an  attempt  to  help  growing 
youth  through  a  new  approach  to  preprofessional  and  high  school  education. 
The  Ethical  Culture  schools  rank  among  the  foremost  as  laboratories  in  education. 
Systematic  ethical  instruction  is  a  special  feature  of  the  schools.  No  attempt  is 
made,  however,  in  the  schools  or  other  institutions  connected  with  the  societies 
to  proselytize  for  the  Ethical  Movement,  The  cultural  and  educational  activities 
are  open  to  all  who  wish  to  take  part,  irrespective  of  religious  views  or  affiliations. 


AMERICAN  RESCUE  WORKERS 


STATISTICS 

The  data  given  for  1936  represent  19  active  stations  of  the  American  Rescue 
Workers,  all  reported  as  being  in  urban  territory.  These  statistics  were  compiled 
from  schedules  sent  directly  to  the  Bureau  by  the  pastor  or  clerk  of  the  individual 
stations  and  the  data  relate  to  these  stations  only. 

Profession  of  faith  in  the  Word  of  God,  as  evidenced  by  baptism  of  the  candidate, 
is  the  only  requirement  for  membership  in  this  organization. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  1  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summarv  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  American  Rescue  Workers 
for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  1. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Stations  (local  organizations),  number        «._    

19 

97 

29 

20 

Increase  >  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

-78 

68 

9 

Percent  a 

Members,  number  

797 

1,989 

611 

430 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 
Number      .                  

-1192 

1,378 

175 

Percent      .                   .               .    .  .     . 

-59.9 

225.5 

40.1 

Average  membership  per  station  

42 

21 

21 

22 

Station  "buildings,  number    

1 

3 

2 

2 

Value  —  number  reporting 

3 

2 

2 

Amount  reported 

$13,  800 

$1,  900 

$9,  700 

Average  value  per  station 

$4,  600 

$950 

$4,  850 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

1 

2 

Amount  reported  

$1,  600 

$25 

$2,  900 

Expenditures: 

Stations  reporting,  number—  

16 

92 

19 

Amount  reported  _  _  

$46,  175 

$135,  214 

$22,  682 

Pastors'  salaries 

$5,  933 

All  other  salaries 

$4,  001 

Repairs  and  improvements  _  _  __ 

$1,  367 

|     $82,838 

$16,  994 

Payment  on  station  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  
Local  relief  and  charity,  Bed  Cross,  etc  

$200 
$9,  846 

$18,  418 

Home  missions 

$98 

Foreign  missions 

1     $49,  282 

$5,  688 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  

$1,  740 

All  other  purposes  - 

$4,  572 

Not  classified 

$3,  094 

Average  expenditure  per  station  

$2,  886 

$1,470 

$1,  194 

Sunday  schools: 
Stations  reporting,  number  

9 

50 

13 

2 

Officers  and  teachers 

60 

90 

61 

18 

Scholars 

395 

1,091 

438 

175 

i  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  2,  3,  and  4  present  the  statistics  for  the  American  Rescue 
Workers  by  States.  Table  2  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  mem- 
bership of  the  stations,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools. 
Table  3  gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  stations  for 

56 


AMERICAN  RESCUE   WOUKE.RS 


57 


the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classi- 
fied as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  4  presents, 
for  1936,  the  station  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improve- 
ments, benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics  of 
any  individual  station,  separate  presentation  in  table  4  is  limited  to  those  States 
in  which  three  or  more  stations  reported  expenditures. 

TABLE  2. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  STATIONS,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND 
SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber 
of 

sta- 
tions 

Num- 
ber 
of 
mem- 
bers 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

Male 

Fe- 
male 

Sex  not 
report- 
ed 

Males 
per  100 
females  l 

Stations 
report- 
ing 

Officers 
and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States... 

19 

3 

3 
4 

2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

797 

283 

390 

124 

72.6 

9 

60 

395 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  . 

130 

68 
38 

73 
160 
80 

60 
100 
9 
24 
55 

53 

28 
14 

37 

65 
24 

29 

62 
40 
24 

36 
95 
56 

31 

15 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

5 
5 
7 

9 
8 

5 

9 
10 

30 

48 
47 

79 
35 
61 

20 
53 

New  Jersey  .  . 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

Illinois  

Wisconsin  

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

Maryland—  

100 
9 

District  of  Columbia. 

8 
25 

16 
30 

1 

2 

22 

Florida  _ 

1  Eatio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  STATIONS,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  stations  in  either  1936, 1926, 1916,  or  1906] 


STATE 

NUMBER  OF  STATIONS 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1986 

1916 

1906 

Under 
13 
years 

13 

years 
and 
over 

Age 
not  re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
13i 

United  States 

19 

97 

29 

20 

797 

1,989 

611 

436 

139 

580 

98 

19.9 

Massachusetts 

6 
6 
5 
19 
13 

3 
12 
3 

1 
4 
1 
12 
3 

2 

364 
67 
81 
382 
298 

46 
270 
53 

55 
38 
15 
108 
17 

65 

New  York 

3 
3- 
4 
2 

2 
1 
10 
1 

1 

130 
68 
38 
73 

30 
20 
322 
7 

9 

48 
45 
22 
73 

82 

New  Jersey 

23 

Pennsylvania  . 

16 

Ohio 

Indiana- 

Illinois 

1 

160 

45 

115 

28.1 

1 

3 

Maryland 

1 
1 

5 

5 

3 
3 

2 
1 

1 

100 
55 

201 
5 

3 

14 

100 
141 

15 

25 

75 
55 

Florida 

Mississippi 

Texas 

California 

3 

11 

1 
1 

52 
153 

15 
42 

Other  States 

H 

4 

173 

45 

46 

127 

26.6 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported;  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 
a  Includes:  Wisconsin,  1;  Delaware,  1;  District  of  Columbia,  1;  and  Georgia,  1. 


58 


CENSUS'  OF  BELIGIOUS  BODIEiS,    1936 


TABLE  4. — STATION  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  stations  reporting] 


p 
o 

EXPENDITURES 

33 

bfl 

a 

Jp 

S« 

fl 

ns 

8 

STATE 

fe 
ft 

g 

4-3 

s 

«J 

<S 

s 

13 

if 

03^ 
P  M 

ii' 

03 

S-B 

1 

OT 

2 

^  w 

Q 

£ 

o 

w 

^g 

IB  C3 

.53 

§  e3 

P< 

p 

a 

1 

*ta 

S 

°s® 

O 

t3 

«> 

1 

.2 

B 

3 

1 

o 

'|n 

g.^0 

in 

o 

1 

u> 

0 

EH 

H 

3 

rt 

HH 

o 

W 

EH 

* 

United  States  

19 

16 

$46,  175 

$5,  933 

$4,001 

$1,367 

S200 

89,846 

$18,418 

S98 

$1,740 

$4,  572 

New  York  

3 

3 

10,  056 

1,300 

1,399 

100 

741 

4,204 

326 

1,  986 

Pennsylvania 

4 

4 

4,249 

1,378 

203 

1,317 

1,088 

263 

Other  States 

12 

19 

31,870 

3,255 

2,399 

1,267 

200 

7,788 

13,  126 

98 

1,  151 

2,586 

*  Includes:  New  Jersey,  2,  Ohio,  2;  Illinois,  1;  Wisconsin,  1;  Florida,  1;  Delaware,  1;  and  Maryland,  1. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 

HISTORY 

About  the  year  1880,  Thomas  E.  Moore  was  put  in  charge  of  the  American  work 
of  the  Salvation  Army  by  Gen.  William  E.  Booth,  whose  headquarters  were  in 
London.  After  a  few  years  a  difference  of  opinion  arose  between  the  two  in  regard 
to  the  financial  administration  of  the  American  branch.  General  Booth  con- 
tended that  a  part  of  all  funds  raised  in  America  should  be  sent  to  England  and 
that,  as  the  work  of  the  Salvation  Army  was  world-wide,  a  member  of  that  army 
should  not  call  any  country  his  own.  Mr.  Moore  contended  that  funds  raised 
by  the  Salvation  Army  in  America  should  be  used  only  in  this  country  and  that 
the  organization  should  have  an  American  charter. 

In  1882,  with  a  number  of  the  American  officers,  he  withdrew  and  began  inde- 
pendent work.  The  movement  was  incorporated  in  1884,  and  in  1885  an  amended 
charter  was  granted  under  the  name  of  the  Salvation  Army  of  America.  Mr. 
Moore  was  made  head  of  the  new  organization  with  the  title  of  general,  but 
subsequently  withdrew  to  enter  the  Baptist  ministry  and  was  succeeded  by 
Col.  Richard  Holz.  Headquarters  were  first  established  at  Mohawk,  N.  Y., 
but  were  afterwards  changed  to  Saratoga  Springs.  Subsequent  changes  in  the 
Salvation  Army  in  the  United  States  and  certain  overtures  made  by  the  new 
commander,  Gen.  Ballingtpn  Booth,  to  General  Holz  and  other  officers  of  the 
new  organization  resulted  in  the  return  of  a  considerable  number  to  the  former 
organization.  However,  about  25  posts  refused  to  return  and  these  united  and 
reorganized;  in  1913  the  name  of  the  organization  was  changed  to  American 
Rescue  Workers,  under  which  name  it  has  been  incorporated  under  the  laws  of 
the  State  of  Pennsylvania;  and  later  incorporated  also  in  the  States  of  New  York, 
Ohio,  California,  and  New  Jersey. 

DOCTRINE 

In  general  doctrine  and  organization  this  body  is  very  similar  to  the  older  one, 
except  that,  besides  being  an  evangelistic  and  philanthropic  movement,  it  is  a 
Christian  church  with  the  usual  sacraments  of  baptism  and  the  Lord's  Supper, 
acknowledging  belief  in  one  God,  in  the  Trinity,  the  inspiration  of  the  Scriptures, 
the  divinity  of  Christ,  the  doctrines  of  original  sin  and  of  the  atonement,  repent- 
ance, and  regeneration  as  prerequisites  to  salvation,  the  inward  witness  of  the 
Holy  Ghost  and  the  eternal  punishment  of  the  wicked  and  the  eternal  reward 
of  the  righteous. 

i  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Beligious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  Gen.  James  W.  Duffin,  commander  in  chief  of  the  American  Rescue 
Workers,  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


AMERICAN  KESCUE   WORKE&S  59 

ORGANIZATION 

The  organization  is  represented  in  its  corporate  capacity  by  a  board  of  directors, 
the  majority  of  whom  are  laymen  and  all  of  whom  are  elected  by  the  duly  quali- 
fied voters  of  the  corporation.  These  directors  are  all  members  of  the  general 
council  of  the  American  Rescue  Workers,  which  includes  also  the  commander, 
the  staff  officers,  the  field  officers,  and  representatives  of  the  corps. 

Titles  to  property  are  not  vested  in  the  general  council,  but  stations  having 
real  estate  may  have  their  own  local  boards  of  directors.  Should  a  station  cease 
to  exist,  however,  the  general  board  is  legally  qualified  to  become  tjb.e  custodian 
of  all  such  property  for  American  Rescue  purposes. 

WORK 

The  organization  has  two  mam  objects,  the  dissemination  of  the  Word  of  God 
to  the  masses  not  reached  by  ordinary  church  methods,  and  the  assistance  of  the 
unfortunate;  as  its  name  indicates,  the  organization  does  a  general  philanthropic 
work,  depending  for  its  support  on  voluntary  contributions. 


APOSTOLIC  OVERCOMING  HOLY  CHURCH  OF  GOD 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Apostolic  Overcoming  Holy  Church  of  God 
for  the  year  1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of 
these  figures  between  urban  and  rural  territory.  These  statistics  were  compiled 
from  schedules  sent  directly  to  the  Bureau  by  the  pastor  or  clerk  of  the  indi- 
vidual churches  and  the  data  relates  to  these  churches  only. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  all  persons  admitted  to  the 
local  churches  upon  confession  of  faith  and  baptism. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMAKY   OF  STATISTICS   FOR  CHURCHES   IN   II  BE  AN    AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEBCENT  OF 
TOTAL  * 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number  - 

23 

863 
38 

188 
675 
27.9 

94 
726 
43 
11.5 

12 
12 
$16,  040 
$15,  850 
$190 
$1,  337 
6 
$3,  000 
3 

1 
1 
$3,  000 

21 

$7,  742 
$4,  183 
$233 
$358 

$419 

$1,  331 
$264 
$141 
$594 
$217 
$369 

20 
131 

567 

13 

591 
45 

116 
475 
24.4 

57 
534 

10 

272 

27 

72 
200 
36.0 

37 
192 
43 
16.2 

6 
6 
$1,040 
$850 
$190 
$173 
1 
$30 
2 

Mem  "hers,  THTmfofir 

68.5 

31.5 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

61.7 
70.4 

38.3 
29.6 

Female  

HVTales  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

13  years  and  over 

73,6 

26.4 

Age  not  reported 

Percent  under  13  years  3        -         - 

9.6 

6 
6 
$15,  000 
$15,  000 

Church  edifices,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting            

Amount  reported  _  ".,  

93.5 
94.6 

6.5 
5.4 
100.0 

Constructed  prior  to  1936 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church     ._ 

$2,  500 

$2,970 
1 

1 
$3,000 

12 

$6,420 
$3,  292 
$210 
$300 

$377 

$1,  231 
$233 
$130 
$528 
$119 
$535 

12 
79 
353 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  _°.__  

99.0 

1.0 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Parsonages,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  ._       «  __ 

100.0 

Expenditures: 
Churches  reporting,  number  „    ._ 

9 
$1,  322 

$891 
$25 
$58 

$42 

$100 
$31 

$11 
$66 
$98 
$147 

8 
52 
214 

Amount  reported  "" 

82.9 

78.7 
89.4 
83.8 

90.0 

92.5 
88.3 
92.2 
88.9 
54.8 

17.1 
21.3 
10.6 
16.2 

10.0 

7.5 
11.7 
7.8 
11.1 
45.2 

Pastors'  salaries                    ..  _. 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  and  im  pro  v6imenffS     ^      „„  j..  „ 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  inter- 
est   

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest    

Local  relief  and  charity,  Ked  Cross,  etc  
Home  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.. 
All  other  purposes 

Average  expenditure  per  church  

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Officers  and'teacher's 

60.3 
62.3 

39.7 
37.7 

Scholars 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 
a  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


APOSTOLIC  OVERCOMING  HOLY  CHUECH  OP  GOD 


61 


Comparative  data,  1936  and  1926.— Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for 
comparison,  a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Apostolic  Overcoming 
Holy  Church  of  God  for  the  census  years  1936  and  1926. 

TABLE  2. — COMPAKATIVE  SUMMARY,  1936  AND  1926 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

ITEM 

1936 

1926 

Churches    (local  organizations), 
number. 

23 

16 

Expenditures: 
Churches  reporting,  number 

21 

16 

Increase  over  preceding  cen- 

Amount reported  

$7,742 

$17,  198 

sus: 

Pastors'  salaries  

$4,  183 

\ 

Number  

7 

All  other  salaries 

$235 

Percent^  

Repairs    and    improve- 

ments 

$358 

Members,  number  

863 

1,047 

Payment  on  church  debt, 

\$15,  010 

Increase3  over  preceding  cen- 

excluding interest  ......... 

$419 

sus: 
Number 

—184 

All    other    current    ex- 
penses, including  interest 

$1,  331 

Percent  

-17.6 

Local  relief  and  charity, 

Average    membership    per 

Red,  Cross,  etc  

$264 

church  „       .    -        ,  . 

38 

65 

Home  missions 

$141 

Foreign  missions 

Church  edifices,  number..    . 

12 

10 

To  general  headquarters 

$2,  188 

Value—  number  reporting  

12 

10 

for  distribution  

$594 

Amount  reported  

$16,  040 

$16,950 

All  other  purposes  

$217 

Average  value  per  church. 
Debt—  number  reporting  

$1,  337 
6 

$1,695 
5 

Average     expenditure    per 
church,.  

$369 

$1,075 

Amount  reported 

$3,  000 

$1,975 

Parsonages,  number 

1 

1 

Sunday  schools  : 
Cfiurches  reporting,  number 

20 

15 

Value  —  number  reporting  

1 

1 

Officers  and  teachers  

131 

67 

Amount  reported  

$3,  000 

$3,000 

Scholars  

567 

1,068 

*  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


2  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


State  table. — Table  3  presents  the  statistics  for  the  Apostolic  Overcoming  Holy 
Church  of  God  by  States  for  1936,  giving  the  number  and  membership  of  the 
churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory,  mem- 
bership classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools, 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 

AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEM- 
BERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY 
SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

'a 
o 

e 

Urban 

a 
« 

•a 

4.3 

o 

fr 

Urban 

*3 

3 

»S? 

1 

•I 

1 

1 

1 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Officers  and 
teachers 

§ 

1 

0 

DQ 

567 

20 
547 

United  States  

EAST  SOUTH  OENTEAL: 
Kentucky  , 

23 

13 

10 

863 

591 

272 

188 

675 

27.9 

20 

131 

1 
22 

1 
12 

"""16" 

30 
833 

30 
561 

"272" 

8 

180 

22 

653 

0) 

27.6 

1 

19 

5 
126 

Alabama  

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


62  CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS  BODIES,    1936 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 

This  denomination,  reported  for  the  first  time  in  1926,  was  incorporated  in 
1916  under  the  laws  of  the  State  of  Alabama  as  the  Ethiopian  Overcoming  Holy 
Church  of  God.  At  the  annual  meeting  in  June  1927,  by  a  majority  vote,  the 
word  " Apostolic"  was  substituted  for  "Ethiopian,"  and  the  denomination  has 
since  been  called  Apostolic  Overcoming  Holy  Church  of  God. 

The  churches  are  nearly  all  in  three  States  of  the  South,  but  there  is  one  organ- 
ization in  Illinois.  The  headquarters  of  the  denomination  are  in  Mobile,  Ala. 

The  National  Convention,  which  meets  annually,  is  divided  into  districts 
called  ministerial  councils.  The  presiding  officer  of  the  general  body  is  a  bishop, 
and  the  church  has  also  elders  and  teachers.  Its  general  purpose  is  evangelistic, 
supported  by  the  payment  of  tithes  from  all  the  members. 

*  No  revision  of  the  history,  doctrine,  or  organization  was  furnished  by  this  body  for  1936,  hence  this  state- 
ment is  the  same  as  that  published  in  Eeligious  Bodies,  vol.  II,  J926. 


ASSEMBLIES  OF  GOD,  GENERAL  COUNCIL 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Assemblies  of  God,  General  Council,  for  the  year 
1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also^the  distribution  of  these  figures  be- 
tween urban  and  rural  territory.  These  statistics  were  compiled  from  schedules 
sent  directly  to  the  Bureau  by  the  pastor  or  clerk  of  the  individual  churches  and 
the  data  relate  to  these  churches  only. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  persons  who  profess  rebirth, 
live  consistent  Christian  lives,  believe  in  the  inspiration  of  the  Holy  Scriptures, 
and  assume  personal  responsibility  for  the  conduct  of  the  church. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY   OF   STATISTICS   FOR   CHURCHES   IN   URBAN   AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEECENT  OF 
TOTAL 

"Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number  

2,611 

148,  043 
57 

53,  902 
91,  849 
2,292 

58.7 

10,  564 
122,  597 
14,  882 
7.9 

1,925 
1,830 
$6,099,541 
$5,513,005 
$586,  536 
$3,  333 
718 
$1,370,965 
868 

715 
580 
$587,  115 

2,477 
$2,876,463 
$1,264,322 
$122,  552 
$215,  961 

$237,  514 

$495,  527 
$38,217 
$62,  252 
$189,  582 
$119,  775 
$130,  761 
$1,  161 

1,083 

92,  775 
86 

33,  788 
57,  402 
1,585 
58.9 

6,760 
77,  423 
8,592 
8.0 

786 
754 
$4,824,007 
$4,  389,  398 
$434,  609 
$6,398 
441 
$1,  245,  142 
258 

268 
202 
$373,  841 

1,055 
$2,126,003 
$837,000 
$100,937 
$157,  829 

$194,  686 

$401,  033 
$29,  408 
$49,  693 
$155,  736 
$98,  546 
$101,  135 
$2,  015 

1,528 

55,268 
36 

20,  114 
34,447 
707 
58.4 

3,804 
45,  174 
6,290 
7.8 

1,139 
1,076 
$1,  275,  534 
$1,  123,  607 
$151,927 
$1,  185 
277 
$125,  823 
610 

447 
378 
$213,  274 

1,422 
$750,  460 
$427,  322 
$21,  615 
$58,  132 

$42,  828 

$94,494 
$8,  809 
$12,  559 
$33,  846 
$21,  229 
$29,  626 
$528 

41.5 
62.7 

58.5 
37.3 

Members,  number 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  bv  sex: 
Male  

62.7 
62.5 
69.2 

37.3 
37.5 
30.8 

Female    

Sex  not  reported 

Males  per  100  females       --.».» 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years    „  

64.0 
63.2 
57.7 

36.0 
36.8 
42.3 

13  years  and  over  

Age  not  reported  

Percent  under  13  years  l 

Church  edifices,  number 

40.8 
41.2 
79.1 
79.6 
74.1 

59.2 
58  8 
20.9 
20.4 
25.9 

Value  —  number  reporting             _  _ 

Amount  reported                    __ 

O  onstructed  prior  to  1936  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936.  _ 
Average  value  per  church 

Debt—number  reporting  

61.4 
90  8 
29.7 

37.5 
34.8 
63.7 

42  6 
73.9 
66.2 
82.4 
73.1 

82.0 

80.9 
77.0 
79.8 
82.1 
82.3 
77.3 

38  6 
9.2 
70.3 

62.5 
65.2 
36.3 

57.4 
26.1 
33.8 
17.6 
26.9 

18.0 

19.1 
23.0 
20.2 
17.9 
17.7 
22.7 

ArnoiTnt  Tftportftfl 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Parsonages,  number      -    -          -  ...  «.-- 

Value  —  number  reporting-.    _  

Amount  reported  

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Amount  reported 

Pastors'  salaries                   -      -      .  

All  other  salaries              .       

Repairs  and  improvements      

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest            _    _    ..    

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest .     .     

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc  
Hforne  Tnispious 

Foreign  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.  .. 
All  other  purposes 

Averaee  expenditure  Der  church  

i  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


63 


64 


CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  1. — SUMMARY   OF   STATISTICS  FOR   CHURCHES  IN   URBAN   AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL 

Urban 

Rural 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number                   -_  

2,321 
21,  745 
179,  356 

190 
1,  445 
11,906 

82 
272 
2,261 

7 
42 
315 

1,000 
11,  440 
106,  221 

99 
961 
8,197 

36 
138 
1,063 

2 

13 

158 

1,321 
10,  305 
73,  135 

91 

484 
3,709 

46 
134 
1,198 

6 
29 
157 

43.1 
52.6 
59.2 

52.1 
66.5 
68.8 

C2) 
50  7 
47.0 

(2) 

ffia 

56.9 
47.4 
40.8 

47.9 
33.5 
31.2 

(2) 
49  3 
53.0 

(2) 
(459.8 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

Weekday  religious  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers  

Scholars    ._  

Parochial  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers  

Scholars    

2  Percent  not  shown  when  base  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1916-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Assemblies  of  God,  General 
Council,  for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  and  1916. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1916  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number               _ 

2,611 

671 

118 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
Number  

1,940 

553 

Percent 

289.1 

468  6 

Members,  number 

148,  043 

47,  950 

6  703 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

100  093 

41  247 

Percent  ._ 

208.7 

615.4 

Average  membership  per  church 

57 

71 

57 

Church  edifices,  number 

1  925 

497 

63 

Value  —  number  reporting 

1  830 

479 

63 

Amount  reported 

$6,099  541 

$3  468  989 

$101  779 

Average  value  per  church 

$3,  333 

$7  242 

$1  616 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

718 

260 

31 

Amount  reported 

$1,  370  965 

$1,  087,  362 

$12  460 

Parsonages,  number  --    -                      * 

715 

Value  —  number  reporting 

580 

125 

10 

Amount  reported 

$587  115 

$255  815 

$7  021 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  Tuimbnr 

2  477 

595 

96 

ATTKYnnt  repnirtflcl 

$2  876  463 

$1  405  491 

$61  941 

Pastors'  salaries  

$1,  264,  322 

All  other  salaries  _  _  . 

$122,  552 

Repairs  and  improvements  

$215,  961 

[•    $1,  089,  993 

$45  675 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  

$237,  514 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest          . 

$495,  527 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

$38  217 

Home  missions  _ 

$62,  252 

Foreign  missions  

$189,  582 

$273  670 

$16  266 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$119,  775 

All  other  purposes  

$130  761 

Not  classified  

$41  828 

Average  expenditure  per  church  _  

$1,  161 

$2,  362 

$645 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number       __      _  _  _ 

2  321 

549 

79 

Officers  and  teachers- 

21  745 

4  232 

460 

Scholars  -        «  

179  356 

41  255 

4  379 

ASSEMBLIES   OF  G.OD,  GESTEBAL   COUNCIL 


65 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Assemblies  of 
God,  General  Council,  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number 
and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or 
rural  territory,  the  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools. 
Table  4  gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for 
the  census  years  1936,  1926,  and  1916,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936 
classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over.77  Table  5 
shows  the  value  of  churches  and  parsonages  and  amount  of  debt  on  church 
edifices  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing 
separately  current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc.  Separate  pres- 
entation in  tables  5  and  6  is  limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches 
reported  value  and  expenditures,  in  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OS- 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP 

BY  SEX 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

3 
£ 

PI 

1 

I 

3 

o 

f 

1 

P5 

& 

"3 

a 

rSJ 
1 

^•0 

Kft 
a> 
05 

n-1 

<D  g 

ft-f 
co  a 

CD  P 

^  o> 

II 

OT  bfl 

0  g3 

it 

5s 

o 

fl<° 
»S 

II 
O4" 

e 

03 

-3 

United  States 

2,611 

1,083 

,528 

48,043 

92,  775 

55,  268 

53,  902 

1,849 

2,292 

58.7 
53.4 

,321 

5 
2 
14 
3 

6 

44 
25 
80 

67 
22 
80 
46 
45 

34 

44 
140 
29 
28 

46 
71 

4 

23 
2 
21 
22 
12 
j 

12 
68 

20 
24 
58 
23 

1,745 

- 

50 
11 
126 
31 
50 

481 
264 
948 

697 
255 
906 
517 
442 

331 

387 
1,429 
225 
241 
425 
804 

79,  358 

245 
72 
856 
148 
280 

3,708 
1,972 
7,543 

5,708 
2,103 
7,316 
3,837 
3,025 

2,701 
2,866 
12,  551 
1,694 
1,545 
2,700 
6,313 

644 
1,858 
818 
1,562 
1,349 
879 
155 
1,103 
4,153 

1,240 
1,691 
3,301 
1,774 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine       _    

6 
2 

17 
3 
8 

52 
25 

84 

71 
25 
87 
48 
46 

38 
48 
156 
31 
31 
54 
76 

4 
24 
4 
27 
24 
12 
i 
18 
95 

25 
32 
79 
27 

2 
1 
15 
3 

7 

45 
19 
54 

54 
19 
53 
27 
32 

21 
24 
53 
7 
8 
14 
29 

J 

t 

i: 
< 
j 

\ 

8 
23 

6 
12 
15 
11 

4 
1 
2 
.... 

7 
6 
30 

17 
6 
34 
21 
14 

17 
24 
103 
24 
23 
40 
47 

1 
17 

""16 
21 
9 

""16 

72 

19 
20 
64 
16 

227 

104 
890 
270 
327 

4,374 
1,523 
6,855 

5,682 
2,077 
7,327 
3,078 
2,464 

1,989 
2,422 
10,  613 
1,245 
1,236 
2,366 
4,192 

525 
1,377 
1,101 
1,039 
993 
673 
154 
1,095 
3,531 

134 
90 
811 
270 
304 

4,206 
1,293 
5,508 

5.  158 
1,786 
6,008 
2,451 
2,033 

1,450 
1,  550 
6,104 
497 
441 
725 
2,527 

487 
660 
1,101 
626 
195 
189 
154 
877 
1,375 

288 
704 
724 
630 

93 

14 
79 

"""23 

168 
230 
1,347 

524 
291 
1,319 
627 
431 

539 
872 
4,509 
748 
795 
1,641 
1,665 

38 
717 

"""413 
798 
484 

""218 
2,156 

564 
761 

79 
41 
324 
101 
128 

1,639 
571 
2,627 

1,754 
780 
2,711 
1,179 
1,018 

779 
943 
3,603 
494 
511 
946 
1,433 

200 
513 
430 
378 
323 
252 
57 
336 
1,148 

282 
577 
1,009 
375 

148 
63 
566 
169 
199 

2,699 
952 
4,228 

2,671 
1,297 
4,616 
1,899 
1,446 

1,210 
1,477 
6,858 
751 
725 
1,420 
2,660 

325 

864 

New  Hampshire.  _ 
Massachusetts  
Rhode  Island  
Connecticut  

36 
1,257 

57.2 
59.8 
64.3 

60.7 
60.0 
62  1 

65.7 
60.1 
58.7 
62.1 
70.4 

64.4 
63.8 
525 
65.8 
70.5 
66.6 
53.9 

61.5 
59,4 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania  

E.  NORTH  OENTEAL: 
Ohio 

Indiana   _ 

Illinois     

Michigan..  

Wisconsin.  

—-- 
152 

"~99 

W.  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North  Dakota  
South  Dakota  
Nebraska         

Kansas        .    

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

60 
222 
58 
173 
173 
97 
31 
112 
522 

145 
201 
433 
18 

Maryland 

Dist.  of  Columbia- 
Virginia 

671 
661 
670 
421 
97 
759 
2,362 

570 
888 
2,061 
783 

64.1 
57.2 
48.2 
59.9 

~44.~3 
48.6 

49.5 
65.0 
49.0 
47.9 

West  Virginia  
North  Carolina... 
South  Carolina,.. 
Georgia   .        

Florida 

21 

E.  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

852 

Tennessee 

1,465 
3,098 
1,178 

""28 
2C 

Alabama    - 

2,374 
548 

MississiDDi  

Katio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100, 


66 


CENSUS'  OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIEiS,    1936 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 — Con. 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP 
BY  SEX 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

I 

1 

s 

•3 

1 

Urban 

, 

42 

3 

Female 

£ 

if 

w 

CD 
W 

Males  per 
100  females  1 

Churches 
reporting 

Officers  and 
teachers 

S 

02 

W.  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Arkansas  

214 
30 
236 
341 

27 
19 
8 
63 

28 
15 
1 

41 
6 
62 
136 

11 
10 
1 
25 
8 
10 

173 
24 
174 

205 

16 
9 
7 
38 
20 
5 
1 
1 

55 
36 
78 

10,  440 
1,311 
11,  428 
19,  093 

1,144 
616 
246 
2,841 
989 
584 
24 
86 

6,059 
2,611 
14,229 

3,787 
513 
5,102 
11,902 

682 
316 
55 
1,706 
341 
446 

6,653 
798 
6,326 
7,191 

462 
300 
191 
1,135 
648 
138 
24 
30 

1,983 
1,155 
3,248 

3,596 
401 
3,973 
6,871 

436 
237 
97 
1,100 
383 
214 
11 
31 

2,260 
1,021 
5,730 

6,813 
910 
7,442 
12,  202 

683 
361 
149 
1,687 
606 
369 
13 
55 

3,314 
1,590 
8,469 

31 

""13 
20 

25 
18 

~~~64 
""""I 

52.8 
44.1 
53.4 
56.3 

63.8 

65  7 
65.1 
65  2 
63  2 
58.0 

185 
28 
218 
301 

25 
14 
8 
56 
24 
14 
1 
2 

85 
53 
183 

1,601 
227 
1,936 
2,639 

220 
102 
68 
492 
165 
97 
6 
14 

842 
462 
1,842 

13,  104 
1,740 
17,699 
23,206 

1,701 
650 
371 
3,726 
1,127 
914 
24 
104 

7,377 
3,308 
16,  595 

Louisiana   - 

Oklahoma 

Texas   _     ... 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana    .  . 

Idaho  

Wyoming  _. 

Colorado          

New  Mexico..  

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada      

3 

91 
58 
195 

2 

36 
22 
117 

56 

4,076 
1,456 
10,  981 

485 

""16 

68.2 
64.2 
67.7 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

Oregon.  .  .„. 

California  ,  

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


ASSEMBLIES   OF   GOD,   GENERAL   COUNCIL 


67 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1916  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926,  or  1916] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP   BY  AGE,    1930 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1936 

1926 

1916 

Under 
3  years 

3  years 
and 
over 

Age  not 
re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
131 

United  States  

2,611 

671 

118 

148,  043 

7,950 

,703 

10,  564 

r  -:  .         s 

49 
17 

22,  597 

;:":-:  •"II,:.TT; 

133 
873 
270 
226 

3,459 
1,340 
5,753 

4,473 
1,682 
5,323 
2,916 
1,717 

1,902 
1,977 
9,421 
640 
973 
1,896 
3,624 

483 
1,264 
951 
887 
844 
665 
104 
985 
2,954 

711 
1,346 
2,472 
1,072 

8,498 
974 
9,805 
16,261 

938 
515 
207 
2,327 

797 
464 
84 

4,918 
2,195 
11,195 

83 

14,  882 

;•    •,"   ..  = 

45 

7.9 

::  .  •  =rr,t 

26.9 
1.9 

NEW  ENGLAND: 

Maine      _  _  _ 

6 
17 
3 
8 

52 
25 

84 

71 
25 
87 
48 
46 

38 
48 
156 
31 
31 
54 
76 

4 

24 
4 
27 
24 
12 
3 
18 
95 

25 
32 

79 
27 

214 
30 
236 
341 

27 
19 
8 

1 
3 

227 
890 
270 
327 

4,374 
1,523 
6,855 

5,682 
2,077 
7,327 
3,078 
2,464 

1,989 
2,422 
10,  613 
1,245 
1,236 
2,366 
4,192 

525 
1,377 
1,101 
1,039 
993 
673 
154 
1,095 
3,531 

852 
1,465 
3,098 
1,178 

10,440 
1,311 
11,428 
19,093 

1,144 
616 
246 
2,841 
989 
584 
86 

6,059 
2,611 
14,229 

128 

95 
123 

Massacb  usetts 

6 
5 
3 

""§" 

Rhode  Island 

Connecticut  __ 

5 

17 
12 
27 

20 
11 
36 
12 
3 

7 
9 
40 
4 

""Is" 

30 

1 
8 
2 
4 
6 
1 
1 
1 
32 

7 
5 
43 
7 

72 
6 
41 
60 

6 
2 

133 

2,023 
805 
2,534 

2,162 
711 
4,029 
833 

817 

603 
400 
2,595 
142 

730 
143 
335 

3 

262 
30 
705 

447 
283 
593 
162 
247 

40 
126 
647 
79 
244 
277 
283 

42 
113 
150 
20 
48 
8 
10 
41 
110 

63 
91 
46 
33 

506 
56 
548 
1,484 

137 
32 
39 
328 
156 
8 
2 

364 
188 
1,402 

45 

98 

653 
153 
397 

762 
112 
1,411 

1.3 

7.0 
2.2 
10.9 

9.1 
14.4 
10.0 
5.3 
12.6 

2.1 
6.0 
6.4 
11.0 
20.0 
12.7 
7.2 

8.0 
8.2 
13.6 
2.2 
5.4 
1.2 
8.8 
4.0 
3.6 

8.1 
6.3 
1.8 
3.0 

5.6 
5.4 
5.3 

8.4 

12.7 
5.9 
15.9 
12.4 
16.4 
1.7 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York     

New  Jersey    

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

Indiana  

"§3l" 

"sie" 

75 
182 
531 

Illinois  .     „ 

Michigan  _. 

Wisconsin       

2 

1 
4 

11 

500 

47 
319 
545 
526 
19 
193 
285 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa  _«  „„_ 

Missouri 

North  Dakota 

South  Dakota 

2~ 
6 

"""T 

Nebraska  _.    

765 
1,736 

143 
505 
355 
152 
286 
33 
20 
38 
1,697 

213 
364 
1,391 
219 

3,641 
459 
2,750 
3,793 

215 

77 

60 

242 

Kansas  _  _„ 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

Maryland 

170 

~~24~ 
69 

District  of  Columbia  
Virginia 

1 
2 

132 
101 

West  Virginia  ... 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina  

40 
69 
467 

78 
28 
580 
73 

1,436 

281 
1,075 
1,348 

69 
69 

Georgia  

"285" 

27 

"l89~ 

Florida   _    .      . 

6 
1 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky-.,  

Tennessee  ___„    

Alabama  

4 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

12 

923 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

13 
25 

780 
897 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 

Montana...    _         . 

Idaho  

Colorado  - 

63 
28 
15 

11 
4 
4 



817 
135 
159 

""48" 

186 
36 
112 

New  Mexico  

Arizona  

1 

PACIFIC: 
Washington  

91 
58 
195 

»3 

11 
7 

77 

2 

2 
_. 

1,225 
613 
8,093 

51 

60 
"286" 

777 
228 
1,632 

6.9 
7.9 
11.1 

35.2 

Oregon  „      

California  

Other  States 

1  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported;  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 
3  Includes:  New  Hampshire,  2,  and  Utah,  1. 


275318 — 41- 


68 


CENSUS1   OF  BELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHTTKCHES  AND  PAKSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

a 
-« 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

"United  States 

2,611 

1,925 

1,830 

86,  099,  541 

718 

1 
8 
2 

17 
10 
35 

17 
8 
27 
18 
24 

17 
15 
33 
12 
11 
13 
27 

6 
9 
3 
4 
4 
11 

7 
10 
9 

7 

30 
9 

52 

87 

8 
7 
4 
17 
4 
5 

27 
20 

77 

6 

$1,  370,  965 

580 

S587,  115 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine 

6 
J7 
8 

52 
25 

84 

71 
25 
87 
48 
46 

38 
48 
156 
31 
31 
54 
76 

24 
27 
24 
12 
18 
95 

25 
32 
79 
27 

214 
30 
236 
341 

27 
19 
8 
63 
28 
15 

91 
58 
195 

20 

3 

8 
5 

32 

17 
54 

33 
17 
63 
34 
30 

27 
32 
103 
23 
17 
37 
53 

21 
22 

15 
10 
18 
78 

15 
28 
66 
24 

166 
28 
204 
279 

21 
15 
6 
32 
22 
11 

62 
43 
143 

8 

3 

7 
4 

31 
17 

48 

31 
17 
57 
32 
28 

27 
31 
98 
23 
16 
35 
50 

19 
22 
15 
10 

18 
74 

15 
26 
62 
23 

158 
26 
191 
269 

21 
12 
6 
30 
21 
11 

58 
43 

137 

»8 

7,142 
73,  300 
31,000 

475,  600 
195,000 
418,  137 

286,  143 
104,  500 
474,  256 
198,251 
148,725 

174,  538 
100,  368 
275,365 
65,  824 
57,  170 
43,800 
115,  723 

68,100 
41,560 
31,018 
15,  300 
27,011 
92,  610 

20,  835 
43,  325 
70,  710 
32,  640 

159,  086 
23,  520 
264,006 
414,  976 

51,  173 
19,  250 
8,725 
71,  285 
20,691 
25,  875 

312,  190 
137,  547 
801,  466 

101,800 

1,950 
38,878 
*,071 

122,  569 
55,  862 
140,  779 

51,  573 
38,023 
113,050 
40,  830 
48,  716 

54,  767 
26,  683 
59,  356 
17,486 
20,063 
4,084 
17,  171 

8,840 
11,365 
5,600 
1,498 
8,049 
9,894 

5,351 
6,735 
3,034 
935 

16,015 
3,403 
25,  507 
82,  183 

6,303 
1,490 
2,352 
16,  376 
656 
6,673 

67,  363 
22,566 
184,171 

14,695 

1 

0) 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 

1 

5 
2 
6 

2 
3 

10 
8 
9 

9 
5 
27 

7 
11 
9 
24 

4 
2 

(») 

24,800 
0) 
20,  500 

(0 
4,750 
22,  850 
23,350 
20,  750 

14,950 
3,700 
18,225 
5,250 
12,  970 
5,700 
26,  200 

8,700 
0) 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

New  Jersey             ..  ... 

Pennsylvania  

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

Indiana 

Illinois         _    _  

Michigan.  __  

"Wisconsin        .  

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri      .    _  

North  Dakota 

South  Dakota  - 

Nebraska         —  

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC- 
Maryland 

Virginia       

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  -      _    _. 

1 
3 
16 

4 
3 

13 

7 

62 
10 
86 
101 

7 
5 
3 
14 
12 
3 

26 
14 
43 

2 

0) 
1,016 
15,905 

1,500 
3,500 
9,450 
7,250 

34,  700 
11,  180 
35,  295 
63,442 

4,600 
4,  350 
1,200 
14,  400 
5,160 
950 

34,  650 
16,  680 
68,  102 

41,100 

Georgia  .._    

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky        .        ...... 

Tennessee 

Alabama    -.    - 

Mississippi.      

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana      

Oklahoma 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN- 
Montana         —  

Idaho 

Wyoming        .    .  .,  -. 

Colorado  ..  

New  Mexico   

Arizona 

PACIFIC: 
Washington.  _. 

Oregon 

California  ..  . 

Other  States  . 

1  Amount  included  in  figures  for  "Other  States,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual  church. 

2  Includes:  New  Hampshire,  2;  Rhode  Island,  1;  Delaware,  2;  South  Carolina,  2;  and  District  of  Colum- 
bia, 1. 


ASSEMBLIES   OF  GOD,   GENERAL   COUNCIL 


69 


TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Repairs 
and 

improve- 
ments 

United  States 

2,611 

2,477 

$2,876,463 

81,264,322 

$122,  552 

$215,  961 

NEW  ENGLAND- 
Maine_.. 

6 

17 
3 
8 

52 
25 
84 

71 
25 
87 
48 
46 

38 
48 
156 
31 
31 
54 
76 

4 
24 
4 

27 
24 
12 
3 

18 
95 

25 
32 
79 

27 

214 
30 
236 
341 

27 
19 
8 
63 

28 
15 

91 
58 
195 

6 

6 
17 
3 

7 

51 
25 
84 

69 
25 
81 
47 
46 

38 
47 
145 
31 
31 
52 
74 

4 
23 
4 
25 
23 
11 
3 
18 
88 

20 
31 
76 
27 

183 
28 
212 
327 

27 
18 
8 
61 
26 
15 

87 
58 
190 

15 

4,357 
27,  138 
9,928 
15,293 

132,  522 
52,  523 
167,469 

126,757 
46,  158 
170,  199 
94.426 
58,  650 

73,  310 
35,  704 
161,  349 
26,762 
29,680 
40,  463 
77,100 

18,  244 
31,115 
35,364 
34,565 
12,014 
6,473 
5,535 
14,749 
49,669 

10,087 
19,591 
32,  127 
19,391 

89,  808 
15,  186 
164,  451 
263,402 

39,464 
14,  136 
6,  731 
53.  575 
15,472 
12,929 

141.  013 
59,  743 
358,445 

3,396 

2,284 
10,  666 
2,731 
5,600 

43,  286 
20,  410 
61,  520 

49,680 
20,657 
63,  478 
32,  834 
22,477 

22,  680 
19,678 
74,  122 
12,  597 
12,  129 
24,768 
37,  510 

3,355 
14,848 
8,819 
10,  448 
5,769 
3,393 
3,220 
7,499 
30,  043 

i           4,944 
11,870 
19,914 
11,085 

55,  934 
10,091 
99,  521 
147,888 

14,425 
6,917 
3,587 
25,019 
9,095 
7.599 

48,  798 
26,  241 
133,  744 

1,149 

68 
1,074 
101 
771 

7,715 
1,440 
10,  178 

7,767 
1,870 
10,067 
6,483 
1,717 

3,973 
1,157 
10,  712 
1,261 
781 
674 
2,290 

680 
990 
1,568 
601 
867 
663 
60 
656 
2,646 

261 
570 
1,379 
653 

2,040 
195 
3,850 
9,597 

727 
370 
5 
1,180 
341 
519 

4,155 
1,945 
15,838 

97 

293 
544 
1,563 
1,900 

4,990 
4,322 
7,689 

4,849 
8,371 
7,357 
6,948 
3,575 

8,614 
1,414 
8,582 
1,852 
864 
1,489 
6,129 

280 
3,156 
3,  065 
7,071 
967 
979 
510 
1,101 
3,539 

823 
527 
4,034 
2,916 

7,289 
660 
14,281 
21,396 

7,030 
791 
235 
2.753 
1,081 
731 

18,  169 
2,782 
28,445 

n 

Massachusetts 

Ehode  Island  ,                

Connecticut.  __  __          «. 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  

New  Jersey.—  .___  

Pennsylvania  .  

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota   _               

Iowa.  _-                         

Missouri      _                  

North  Dakota.  

South  Dakota    

Nebraska 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC* 
Delaware              

Maryland             

District  of  Columbia 

Virginia 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina 

Georgia  _ 

Florida              

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi           .        

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

Louisiana  

Oklahoma  

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana                .     ..._._ 

Idaho  

Wyoming  

Colorado  

New  Mexico  

Arizona.            _    

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

Oregon 

California                     

Other  States  

« Includes:  New  Hampshire,  2;  Utah,  1;  and  Nevada,  2. 


70  CENTS'  OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

TABLE  6. — CHUECH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 — Continued 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

EXPENDiTURES—continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local 
relief 
and 
charity 

Home 
mis- 
sions 

Foreign 
missions 

To 

general 
head- 
quarters 

All 
other 
•pur- 
poses 

United  States 

$237,  514 

83 
1,587 
480 
2,069 

4,  445 
4,924 
14,  320 

16,  515 
1,670 
15,006 
9,280 
6,626 

6,917 
3,  852 
6,376 
2,765 
3,882 
1,442 
9,401 

610 
980 
8,091 
9,984 
901 
303 
351 
1,123 
1,944 

937 
3,459 
3,083 
1,975 

3,243 

1,801 
12,  552 
19,  372 

4.480 
1,115 
857 
5,434 
1,185 
523 

7,781 
3,660 
32,030 

100 

$495,  527 

$38,217 

$62,  252 

15 
806 
966 
130 

4,273 
1,498 

2,715 

3,370 

767 
3,315 
3,000 
1,895 

2,731 
385 
1,  609 
301 

772 
702 
670 

550 
311 
2,234 
372 
127 
17 
10 
1,029 
926 

272 
164 
297 
43 

926 
193 
1,958 
4,710 

1,022 
248 
159 
623 
399 
287 

4,839 
905 
9,481 

229 

$189,  582 

399 

1,826 
1,463 
703 

15,  331 
4,910 
22,  387 

7,857 
2,546 
22,  295 
7,801 
4,772 

4,315 
1,556 
7,936 
1,  103 
1,  581 
1,469 
3,657 

2,807 
3,262 
1,512 
430 
641 
136 
280 
1,161 
2,312 

375 
499 
421 
62 

1,397 
467 
5,061 
6,988 

1,427 
1,070 
366 
2,493 
322 
189 

14,  063 
4,480 
23,221 

233 

$119,775 

49 
1,341 
90 

551 

16,618 
1,  606 
5,666 

11,  138 
544 
5,581 
1,945 
1,657 

1,973 
1,377 
4,193 
1,  353 

744 
1,081 
2,545 

628 
573 
2,203 
681 
475 
82 
20 
350 
793 

185 
359 
744 
452 

6,766 
155 
3,557 
6,391 

1,922 
639 
21 
1,040 
317 
449 

6,341 
1,981 
22,606 

4 

$130,761 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine    - 

1,117 
7,405 
2,260 
3,424 

30,  710 
9,448 
38,  207 

21,  356 
6,958 
35,  103 
22,  171 
13,  725 

17,848 
4,456 
26,  811 
4,729 
7,858 
7,370 
11,  548 

9,198 
5,861 
5,105 
2,952 
1,808 
481 
964 
1,255 
3,627 

2,135 
1,444 
2,236 
903 

8,304 
1,173 

15,  252 
30,627 

6,310 
2,621 
846 
10,630 
1,824 
1,376 

28,536 
13,  523 
62,729 

1,300 

49 

1,589 
255 
20 

1,790 
3,  356 
2,849 

3,443 
2,421 
6,328 
2,902 
1,617 

3,476 
1,623 
19,313 
560 
940 
1,341 
2,325 

41 
802 
2,105 
1,837 
358 
265 

Massachusetts. 

300 
19 
125 

3,364 
609 
1,938 

782 
354 
1,669 
1,062 
589 

783 
206 
1,  695 
238 
129 
127 
1,025 

95 
332 
662 
189 
101 
154 
120 
263 
608 

27 

98 
267 
824 

1,166 
141 
2,698 
6,678 

1 

10 
86 
374 
340 
224 

835 
851 
6,047 

12 

Rhode  Island  

Connecticut 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  

New  Jersey  __    

Pennsylvania  ..  _.  . 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

Indiana  

Illinois  

Michigan  

Wisconsin  

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri- 

North  Dakota- 

South  Dakota  _ 

Nebraska...    _         

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware  

Maryland  

District  of  Columbia  

Virginia 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina 

Georgia  . 

312 
3,231 

128 
601 

1,752 
478 

2,754 
310 
5,723 
9,755 

2,120 
352 
669 
4,029 
5fi8 
1,032 

7,496 
3,375 
24,304 

267 

Florida   . 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAT  : 
Kentucky  

Tennessee  

Alabama  

Mississippi  _  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas.. 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma  . 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana.  . 

Idaho 

Wyoming..     _        ...    . 

Colorado  _„ 

New  Mexico  .-    ... 

Arizona  ,.—  „ 

PACIFIC: 

Washington  

Oregon  

California  

Other  States 

ASSEMBLIES   OF  GOD,   GENERAL   COUNCIL  71 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 

DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

Following  a  great  revival  movement  which,  swept  around  the  world  in  1906  and 
1907,  a  considerable  number  of  churches,  missions,  or  assemblies  in  the  United 
States  found  a  common  interest  in  a  distinctively  evangelistic  type  of  mission 
work.  This  was  at  first  purely  independent  and  voluntary,  but  some  association 
and -mutual  fellowship  became  recognized  as  valuable  and  necessary  for  the 
purpose  of  establishing  doctrinal  standards  and  providing  effective  methods  of 
home  and  foreign  missionary  work. 

In  the  spring  of  the  year  1914,  a  group  of  pastors  of  indepen4ent  churches  issued 
a  call  for  all  interested  in  Bible  order,  system,  evangelism,  and  united  doctrine  to 
meet  at  Hot  Springs,  Ark.  About  100  delegates  came  to  this  meeting.  Some 
were  former  ministers  of  evangelical  denominational  churches  and  others  were 
serving  as  pastors  of  churches,  not  having  had  previous  denominational  member- 
ship. An  organization  was  agreed  upon  based  on  the  principles  of  voluntary 
unity  and  cooperation  in  religious  effort.  This  organization  was  firsft  incorporated 
in  Arkansas  in  October  1914,  and  then  in  Missouri  in  November  1916,  under  the 
name  of  "The  General  Council  of  the  Assemblies  of  God." 

DOCTRINE 

The  doctrine  of  the  Assemblies  of  God  tends  mostly  toward  Arminian  princi- 
ples, emphasizing  the  inspiration  of  the  Scriptures;  the  fall  and  redemption  of 
man;  the  baptism  in  the  Holy  Ghost  accompanied  by  the  speaking  in  other 
tongues;  sanctification  as  the  goal  for  all  believers;  the  church  a  living  organism; 
a  divinely  called  and  scrip turally  ordained  ministry;  divine  healing;  the  pre- 
millennial  and  imminent  coming  of  Jesus  to  judge  the  world  in  righteousness, 
while  reigning  on  earth  for  a  thousand  years;  everlasting  punishment  for  the 
wicked,  and  a  new  heaven  and  a  new  earth  for  the  believers.  While  they  recognize 
human  government  and  affirm  unswerving  loyalty  to  the  United  States,  the 
Assemblies  of  God  claim  that  as  followers  of  the  Prince  of  Peace  they  are  con- 
strained to  declare  that  they  could  not  conscientiously  participate  in  war  and 
armed  resistance  which  involves  the  actual  destruction  of  human  life. 

ORGANIZATION 

The  polity  of  the  denomination  is  a  combination  of  the  Congregational  and 
Presbyterian  systems.  The  local  churches  are  Congregational  in  the  conduct  of 
their  affairs,  and  their  sovereignty  in  this  respect  is  fully  recognized  by  the  Gen- 
eral Council  constitution.  They  act,  however,  under  the  advice  and  suggestions 
of  the  district  and  general  presbyters. 

The  work  of  the  denomination  in  the  IJnited  States  has  been  divided  into  35 
districts,  largely  following  State  border  lines.  These  districts  are  officered  by  a 
district  presbytery,  chosen  by  the  membership  of  each  district  and  entrusted  with 
the  examination,  licensing,  and  ordination  of  ministers.  The  extension  of  the 
fellowship  through  home  mission  effort  is  also  entrusted  to  the  district  councils. 

All  ordained  ministers  are  members  of  the  General  Council,  which  meets 
biennially.  At  this  council,  general  officers  are  chosen,  doctrinal  standards  are 
established,  and  ways  and  means  adopted  for  church  extension.  Departmental 
heads  are  also  chosen,  who  serve  in  the  capacity  of  executive  presbyters,  A 
general  presbytery  serves  in  an  advisory  capacity  to  the  executive  presbytery. 
The  membership  in  the  general  presbytery  is  composed  of  three  members  from 
each  district  council,  elected  by  the  districts  to  this  office.  The  general  officers 
are  superintendent,  assistant  superintendent,  secretary,  treasurer,  home  missions 
secretary,  foreign  missions  secretary,  principal  of  Bible  Training  School,  editor  of 
publications,  etc. 

i  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Keport  of  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  J.  Roswell  Flower,  general  secretary,  General  Council  Assemblies  of  God, 
Springfield,  Mo.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


72  CENSUS1  OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

WORK 

The  primary  work  of  the  Assemblies  of  God  is  evangelistic  and  missionary  and 
this  work  is  pursued  diligently  through  the  home  and  foreign  missions  depart- 
ments. Outgoing  missionaries,  whether  ordained  or  not,  must  be  endorsed  by  the 
missionary  committee  of  the  General  Council.  All  local  churches  are  encouraged 
to  have  a  part  in  the  missionary  program  and  many  local  assemblies  support 
missionaries  on  the  foreign  field  wholly  or  in  part.  Missionary  funds  go  through 
the  central  missionary  committee  but  a  considerable  amount  is  sent  by  individ- 
uals and  churches  directly  to  missionaries  whom  they  support  or  help  to  support. 
Annual  missionary  receipts  and  disbursements  are  running  well  over  $350,000  per 
year.  All  offerings  for  foreign  work  are  sent  to  the  field,  100  percent,  without 
any  deduction  whatever  for  home  administration,  the  expense  of  the  conduct  of 
the  foreign  missions  department  being  met  by  free-will  offerings  and  grants  from 
the  general  fund  of  the  denomination. 

Only  one  school  is  operated  under  the  direct  supervision  of  the  General  Council, 
the  Central  Bible  Institute  at  Springfield,  Mo.  This  school  has  accommoda- 
tions for  about  500  students  and  offers  a  3-year  course  for  the  training  of  ministers 
and  missionaries.  Other  schools  are  operating  under  district  supervision  at 
Minneapolis,  Minn.,  Seattle,  Wash.,  San  Francisco,  Calif.,  Pasadena,  Calif.,  Zion, 
III.,  Green  Lake,  Pa.,  Enid,  Okla.,  Fort  Worth,  Tex.,  Houston,  Tex.,  and  New 
Brockton,  Ala.  The  total  enrollment  is  approximately  2,000,  and  the  courses 
are  devoted  exclusively  to  subjects  pertaining  to  ministerial  and  missionary  work. 

There  are  some  district  publications,  but  the  publishing  work  of  the  denomina- 
tion has  been  centered  largely  in  the  Gospel  Publishing  House  of  Springfield,  Mo., 
which  is  entrusted  with  the  publication  of  the  Pentecostal  Evangel,  published 
weekly,  the  Sunday  school  literature  and  numerous  books,  pamphlets,  and  tracts. 


ASSYRIAN  JACOBITE  APOSTOLIC  CHURCH 


STATISTICS 

•  The  data  given  for  1936  represent  four  active  organizations  of  the  Assyrian 
Jacobite  Apostolic  Church,  all  reported  as  being  in  urban  territory.  These  sta- 
tistics were  compiled  from  schedules  sent  directly  to  the  Bureau  by  the  pastor 
or  clerk  of  the  individual  churches  and  the  data  relate  to  these  churches  only. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  all  persons  received  into  the 
local  churches  through  baptism. 

Comparative  data,  1916-36. — Table  1  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Assyrian  Jacobite  Apostolic 
Church  for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  and  1916. 

TABLE  1. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1916  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number  

4 

3 

is 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 
Number             ._    _                  _>                 _ 

1 

•in 

Percent2  .__ 

Members,  number 

3,100 

1  407 

748 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
Number.               __  _    

1,693 

659 

Percent..      ._      _  _        

120.3 

88.1 

Average  membership  per  church  __ 

775 

469 

50 

Church  edifices,  number  .  

4 

3 

Value  —  number  reporting  

4 

3 

Amount  reported 

$UO,  000 

$92,  000 

Average  value  per  church 

$27,  500 

$30,  667 

"pp.bt  —  nitTnber  reporting'                             ^T      

3 

3 

Amount  reported  __    __    __      

$17,000 

$27,  500 

Parsonages,  number                        --  . 

1 

Value  —  number  reporting                  -                  - 

1 

Amount  reported  _  _                          _            

$6,  000 

Expenditures: 

fhurchQS  T^portiTig,  ntrm'hfir                      ,     ,r  ,  ^ 

4 

3 

Am  mint  report  Ad 

$13,880 

$24,  253 

Pastors'  salaries     

$4,  540 

All  other  salaries    

$350 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$1,  800 

$23  576 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest 

$1,  700 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest 

$1,  550 

Local  relief  and  charity*  Ked  Cross,  etc    . 

$550 

i 

"PToTT1  Tnlssions 

$3,  090 

Foreign  missions    

$300 

>           $677 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

1 

All  other  purposes 

j 

Average  expenditure  per  church                                           

$3,  470 

$8,  084 

Sunday  schools: 
^•hurch^s  ^-porting1  numbor 

3 

Officers  and  teachers 

20 

Scholars 

160 

i  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  2  and  3  present  the  statistics  for  the  Assyrian  Jacobite 
Apostolic  Church  by  States.  Table  2  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number 
and  membership  of  the  churches,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for 
Sunday  schools.  Table  3  gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of 
the  churches  for  the  three  census  years  1916  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership 
for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over." 

73 


74 


CENSUS1  OF  BELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  2. — NUMBEE  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHUBCHES,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND 
SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
mem- 
bers 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

Male 

Female 

Males 
per  100 
females 

Churches 
reporting 

Officers 
and 
teach- 
ers 

Schol- 
ars 

United  States  

4 

3,100 

880 
470 

1,200 
550 

1,680 

1,420 

118.3 

3 

1 
1 

1 

20 

6 
6 

8 

160 

NEW  ENGLAND: 

Massachusetts  „  

1 
1 

1 

1 

465 
250 

665 
300 

415 
220 

535 
250 

112  0 
113.6 

124.3 
120.0 

40 
65 

55 

Rhode  Island  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  Jersey 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Michigan 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OP  CHURCHES,  1916  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926,  or  1916] 


STATE 

NUMBEE    OF 
CHUBCHES 

NUMBER    OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE, 
1936 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1936 

1936 

1916 

Under 
13 
years 

13  years 
and 
over 

Per- 
cent 
under 
13 

United  States.                  „  » 

4 

3 

15 

3,100 

1,407 

748 

860 

2,240 

27.7 

201 
19.2 

39.2 

Massachusetts 

1 
1 

12 

1 
1 

1 

6 

5 

4 

880 
1,200 

1,020 

220 
1,025 

162 

291 
311 

146 

230 
230 

400 

650 
970 

620 

New  Jersey 

Other  States 

i  Includes:  Rhode  Island,  1,  and  Michigan,  1. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  l 
HISTORY 

The  Assyrian  Jacobite  Apostolic  Church  traces  its  origin  to  the  first  12  apostles 
of  Christ,  particularly  to  St.  Peter,  the  first  Patriarch  of  Antioch, 

The  gospel  had  its  origin  in  Syria  and  the  Assyrian  fathers  were  the  first  Chris- 
tian missionaries.  From  the  beginning  of  Christianity,  the  Assyrians  went  out 
to  Gaul,  Persia,  India,  China,  and  Africa,  where,  notwithstanding  severe  perse- 
cutions, they  succeeded  in  establishing  numerous  schools  and  monasteries.  They 
have  been  constantly  persecuted  by  the  various  Roman,  Greek,  Persian,  and 
Turkish  rulers,  and,  judging  from  the  continuous  numerous  outrages,  it  would 
seem  that  the  Turks  and  Arabs  intended  to  exterminate  all  the  Assyrian  Christians. 
In  the  face  of  all  these  persecutions  they  gallantly  faced  death,  and  to  this  day 
they  ably  uphold  the  early  Christian  faith. 

Contact  with  American  missionaries  who  had  established  schools  in  various 
localities  turned  the  attention  of  the  Assyrians  to  America,  and  they  fled  from  the 
rule  of  the  Moslem  Turk  and  sought  shelter  under  the  American  flag.  This  im- 
migration began  about  1893,  and  soon  there  were  several  large  Assyrian  communi- 
ties in  the  United  States.  Some  of  these  people  were  members  of  the  Assyrian 

1  No  revision  of  history,  doctrine,  or  organization  was  furnished  by  this  body  for  1936,  hence  this  statement 
is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Keligious  Bodies,  1926. 


ASSYRIAN    JACOBITE   APOSTOLIC1   CHUUCH  75 

Roman  Catholic  Church,  others  belonged  to  the  Assyrian  Protestant  Church, 
while  still  others  belonged  to  the  Assyrian  Nestprian  Church  or  the  Chaldean 
Church.  On  coming  here,  all  except  the  Nestorians  identified  themselves  with 
their  respective  American  denominations.  The  majority  of  them,  however,  were 
members  of  the  Assyrian  Jacobite  Apostolic  faith,  and  as  the  number  of  immi- 
grants continued  to  increase,  church  services  for  them  were  in  great  demand. 

In  April  1907,  the  Assyrian  Americans  sent  Deacon  Hanna  Koorie,  then  of 
Paterson,  N.  J.,  to  Jerusalem.  There  he  was  ordained  priest  and  later  a  koorie 
(cvhoorie).  He  returned  to  the  United  States  September  28  of  the  same  year. 
Immediately  afterward,  he  assembled  the  dispersed  Assyrians,  for  the  first  time, 
to  worship  in  St.  Luke's  Episcopal  Church,  Paterson,  N.  J.  The  members  of  this 
faith  are  scattered  in  various  States,  but  their  churches  were  reported  only  from 
two  New  England  States,  New  Jersey,  and  Michigan. 

DOCTRINE 

The  doctrine  of  this  church  is  based  on  the  Nicene  Creed.  It  varies,  however 
from  that  of  the  Western  Church  as  regards  the  procession  of  the  Holy  Ghost 
and  uses  the  phraseology,  "the  Holy  Ghost  proceeded  from  the  Father  and  is 
with  the  Son."  It  accepts  the  canons  of  the  first  three  General  Councils  of  the 
church,  namely,  the  Nicene,  Constantinople,  and  Ephesus,  as  well  as  the  writings 
of  the  recognized  fathers  of  the  church  of  the  period  of  these  councils.  It  teaches 
that  Christ  was  perfect  God  and  perfect  man.  The  interpretation  of  the  Bible, 
the  ecclesiastical  ordinances,  as  well  as  the  traditions  of  the  church,  are  held 
equally  important.  The  seven  sacraments,  baptism,  confirmation,  the  eucharist, 
penance,  extreme  unction,  orders,  and  matrimony,  are  accepted.  Baptism  is 
administered  by  pouring  and  by  immersion,  chiefly  the  latter;  it  usually  takes 
place  several  days  after  birth,  and  is  followed  by  the  ceremony  of  anointing  with 
the  sacred  oil  or  chrism  in  the  form  of  a  cross,  and  by  the  laying  on  of  hands. 
The  minister  also  breathes  on  the  child  and  on  the  water.  The  membership  of 
the  church  includes  all  baptized  persons.  Auricular  confession  is  accepted.  Holy 
Communion  is  the  sacrament  which  contains  the  body  and  blood  of  Christ  under 
appearance  of  bread  and  wine.  It  is  received  fasting  and  is  given  to  the  laity  in 
only  one  kind,  the  form  of  bread.  The  Blessed  Virgin  and  the  saints  are  venerated, 
and  prayers  are  offered  for  the  dead. 

ORGANIZATION 

The  organization  of  the  Assyrian  Jacobite  Apostolic  Church  centers  on  the 
Patriarch  of  Antioch,  who  resides  at  Mardin,  Dair  el  Zahfaran,  and  his  authority 
is  supreme  on  faith  and  in  all  church  matters.  Next  in  rank  is  the  Metropolitan, 
or  mifrian,  who  resides  in  Mosul  and  who  ordains  the  bishops.  Then  follow  the 
iskiffs  and  the  mitrans,  who  together  with  the  mifrian,  act  as  advisers  to  the 
patriarch  and  as  heads  of  various  commissions  or  congregations  which  have  charge 
of  the  church  administration.  Only  a  mifrian  can  become  a  patriarch.  The 
mifrian  is  chosen  from  the  mitrans  all  of  whom  are  celibates.  Then  follows  the 
office  of  bishop,  or  koorie  (cvhoorie),  rhahib,  priest,  and  deacon,  respectively. 
A  deacon  under  30  years  of  age  cannot  be  ordained  to  the  priesthood.  A  celibate 
deacon  can  be  ordained  to  the  office  of  rhahib,  mitran,  mifrian,  and  patriarch. 
A  married  deacon  can  become  a  priest,  a  koorie  (cvhoorie) ,  or  an  iskiff . 

The  government  of  this  church  is  democratic,  every  officer  of  the  church  from 
the  lowest  to  the  highest  being  chosen  by  the  people.  It  is  also  in  a  sense  hier- 
archical, for  every  priest  must  be  ordained  by  a  bishop  whose  commission  is  traced 
to  the  apostles  through  the  apostolic  succession  of  bishops.  The  Patriarch  of 
Antioch  is  the  supreme  head  of  all  the  Assyrian  churches  throughout  the  world, 
and  he  was  represented  at  the  second  World  Conference  on  Faith  and  Order  at 
Lausanne,  Switzerland. 

The  official  periodical  of  the  church  is  the  Beth  Nahrin  (Mesopotamia),  pub- 
lished in  West  New  York,  N.  J. 


BAHA'IS 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification, — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  American  Bahd/is  for  the  year  1936  is  presented 
in  table  1,  which  shows,  also,  the  distribution  of  these  statistics  between  urban 
and  rural  territory.  These  statistics  were  compiled  from  schedules  sent  dfrectly 
to  the  Bureau  by  the  individual  assemblies  and  the  data  relate  to  these  assemblies 
only. 

To  become  a  voting  member  of  a  BaM'i  community  one  must  be  a  resident  of 
the  locality  (city,  town,  or  village)  in  which  the  community  exists;  have  attained 
the  age  of  21  years;  and  have  established  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  local  Spiritual 
Assembly,  subject  to  the  approval  of  the  National  Assembly,  that  he  possesses 
all  the  qualifications  of  Bahd'i  faith  and  practice. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOB  ASSEMBLIES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Assemblies  (local  organizations),  number  3  

88 

2,584 
29 

171 
354 
2,059 
483 

10 
2,574 
0.4 

17 
$6,827 
$125 
$2,028 
$281 
$5 
$3,464 
$924 
$402 

84 

2,534 
30 

163 
337 
2,034 
48.4 

9 

2,525 
0.4 

15 
$5,822 
$125 
$1,528 
$281 
$5 
$2,959 
$924 
$388 

4 

50 
13 

8 
17 
25 
(3) 

1 
49 
(0 

2 

$1,005 

MenObers,  number  ,  

98,1 

1.9 

Average  membership  per  assembly  

Membership  by  sex. 
Male 

95.3 
95.2 
98.8 

4.7 
4.8 
1.2 

Female  ..        -  

Sex  not  reported  ._ 

Males  per  100  females  

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

13  years  and  over    .           .  , 

98.1 

1.9 

Percent  under  13  years  

Expenditures  : 

Assemblies  reporting,  number  _  - 

Amount  reported-  .  

85.3 
1000 
75.3 
100.0 

14.7 

Eepairs  and  improvements  

All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest-- 
Local relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.--  _ 

$500 

24.7 

Home  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$505 

85.4 
100.0 

14.6 

All  other  purposes  

Average  expenditure  per  assembly 

$503 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

3  This  body  does  not  report  churuh  edifices,  except  the  National  Temple  of  the  American  Bah&'is.  This 
temple  is  in  the  course  of  construction  and  the  present  value  is  reported  as  $1,040,000. 
s  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

76 


BAHA'IS 


77 


The  data  given  for  1936  represent  88  fully  organized  local  assemblies,  or  com- 
munities, of  Bahd/is,  with  2,574  voting  members,  having  direct  connection  with 
the  National  Administrative  Board,  and  there  were  10  members  under  13  years 
of  age.  With  regard  to  this  membership  it  may  also  be  stated  that  many  other 
persons  who  retain  their  membership  in  other  denominations  attend  the  Baha"'i 
meetings  and  are  closely  identified  with  the  movement.  No  parsonages  or 
Sunday  schools  were  reported. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  present?,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  this  body  for  the  four  census 
years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906.  The  change  between  1926  and  1916  in  the 
character  of  the  returns  is  explained  by  a  change  in  the  method  of  organization 
of  the  local  assemblies  and  by  the  adoption  of  a  moie  definite  basis  for  voting 
membership. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Assemblies  (local  organizations),  number                     

88 

44 

57 

24 

Increase^  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

44 

-13 

33 

Percent  2 

Members,  number    _  .»    -.,...„          

2,584 

1,247 

2,884 

1,280 

Increase  1  over  preceding  census: 
Number         .     .    .  .  

1,337 

-1,637 

1,604 

Percent 

107.2 

—56.8 

125.3 

Average  membership  per  assembly 

29 

28 

51 

53 

TVmples,  miTmbfif 

1 

1 

1 

Amount  reported 

3  $1,  040,  000 

3  $500,  000 

$1,  273 

Expenditures  : 
Asserobhfis  reporting,  number 

17 

23 

Amount  reported.      .                   

$6,  827 

*  $51,  000 

$6,  877 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$125 

$2,  134 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest   .  . 

$2,  028 

$800 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

$281 

$3,  943 

Home  missions.                       __  .           _          

$5 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$3,  464 

All  other  purposes 

$924 

Average  expenditure  per  assembly 

$402 

$299 

Sunday  schools  : 
Assemblies  reporting,  number  ._  

4 

1 

Officers  ftTid  tBRchftrs 

12 

7 

Scholars                                       _.  --  

123 

32 

1  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 

2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

3  Represents  the  value  of  the  National  Temple  of  the  American  Bah&'is,  which  is  in  the  course  of  con- 
struction. 

4  Includes  only  the  budget  of  the  National  Spiritual  Assembly.    Detailed  expenditures  not  reported  by 
the  individual  assemblies. 

State  tables. — Tables  3  and  4  present  the  statistics  for  the  Bah&'is  by  States. 
Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  membership  of  the  assemblies 
classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory.  Table  4  gives 
for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  assemblies  for  the  census 
years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 


78 


CENSUS   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  ASSEMBLIES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

STATE 

NUMBER  OF  ASSEMBLIES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

Total 

Urban 

Rural 

Total 

Urban 

Rural 

United  States  

88 

84 

4 

2,584 

31 
112 
40 

354 
121 
49 

185 
30 

427 
105 

282 

52 
15 
9 
10 

26 
80 
28 
CO 

15 

9 
2 
40 
38 

71 
40 
353 

2,534 

50 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
M^aine 

1 
4 
2 

10 
2 

7 
2 
9 
6 

4 

3 

1 
2 
1 

2 

1 
I 

4 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 

3 
1 

12 

1 
4 
2 

10 

4 
2 

7 
2 
9 
6 
4 

3 
1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
4 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 

2 

1 
10 

31 
112 
40 

354 
121 
49 

185 
30 
427 
105 

282 

52 
IS 
9 
10 

16 
80 

28 
60 

15 

9 
2 
40 
38 

56 
40 
328 

M!  assachuset  t  s 

C  oitnect  lent 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL- 
Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Maryland  _-      _         

1 

10 

District  of  Columbia  
Georgia 

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Tennessee 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana 

Idaho 

Colorado    ...  _. 

Arizona  -            -  - 

PACIFIC: 
Washington  

1 

15 

Oregon    . 

California 

2 

25 

TABLE  4:. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  ASSEMBLIES,  BY  STATES,  1906  TO  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  assemblies  in  either  1936,  1926,  1916,  or  1908] 


STATE 

NUMBER  OF  ASSEMBLIES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

United  States._  

88 

44 

57 

24 

2,584 

1,247 

2,884 

1,280 

70 
23 
58 
52 

87 
492 
28 
167 

Massachusetts  .  

4 
10 
4 
2 

7 
9 
6 
4 

3 

4 
3 
12 

120 

3 
5 
3 
2 

3 
3 

4 
3 

5 
7 
6 
3 

4 
2 
5 
5 

1 
2 
2 
2 

3 
1 
2 
3 

112 
354 
121 
49 

185 
427 
105 
282 

52 
60 
71 
353 

413 

70 
245 
55 
62 

61 
179 
70 
36 

172 
295 
98 
132 

223 

562 
58 
165 

New  York   _.  _,  -  .  _  . 

New  Jersey   .......... 

Pennsylvania      ..„..,  „„ 

Ohio  

Illinois  .  .  .  .  . 

Michigan             _  .      ..  _  . 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota     __            ........... 

Florida 

Washington 

1 
8 

9 

3 

5 

12 

2 
2 

4 

30 

205 

234 

180 
497 

502 

39 
110 

154 

California 

Other  States 

i  Includes:  Maine,  1;  Connecticut,  2;  Indiana,  2;  Missouri,  1;  Nebraska,  2;  Kansas,  1;  Maryland,  2; 
Georgia,  1;  District  of  Columbia,  1:  Tennessee.  1:  Montana.  l:Idaho.  1:  Colorado.  2:  Arizona.  1:  and  OrAenn.  i. 


BAHA  'IS  79 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND   ORGANIZATION  1 

HISTORY 

For  more  than  80  years,  the  Baha'i  cause  has  been  steadfastly  presented  to  the 
world  as  the  expression  for  this  age  of  the  same  universal  Spirit  which  in  other 
ages  spoke  through  Zoroaster,  Muhammad,  the  Buddha,  Moses,  Christ;  and  as 
one  Divine  utterance  and  continuous  purpose,  giving  forth  one  and  the  same 
message,  albeit  adapted,  to  the  conditions  and  human  capacities  of  each  time. 
Each  successive  revelation  renews  the  spirit  of  faith  and  confirms  the  ideals  of 
the  previous  prophets  and  messengers;  but  religion  also  progresses  and  each 
cycle  discloses  a  new  aspect  of  truth.  In  Bah&Vllali,  according  to  his  explicit 
text,  the  Message  of  God  has  been  revealed  to  mankind  in  its  fullness  and  uni- 
versality, and  the  Baha'i  cause  accordingly  represents  the  fulfillment  of  that 
which  was  but  partially  revealed  in  previous  dispensations. 

The  history  and  general  principles  of  the  Bahd'is,  as  expressed  in  the  teachings 
of  the  founder  and  his  followers,  are  given  in  the  following  condensed  statements: 

The  first  significant  Baha'i  date  is  May  23,  1844. 

At  that  time  Western  Asia  was  decadent.  The  administration  of  justice  was 
inefficient;  bribery  and  dishonesty  pervaded  all  ranks,  while  education  and  sani- 
tation were  neglected.  In  Persia  the  dominant  religious  party  was  the  Shi'ih 
sect  of  Muhammadans,  who  were  noted  for  intolerance  and  bigotry  and  regarded 
Jews,  Christians,  Zoroastrians,  and  even  Muhammadans  of  other  sects,  as  people 
in  error,  considering  it  a  merit  to  insult  and  revile  them.  Yet  the  life  of  the  spirit 
was  not  extinct,  and  amid  the  prevailing  worldliness  and  superstition  could 
still  be  found  some  who  longed  for  the  establishment  of  God's  kingdom  and  were 
eagerly  awaiting  the  coming  of  the  promised  Messenger,  confident  that  the  time 
of  His  advent  was  at  hand. 

On  the  date  previously  mentioned,  there  appeared  in  Shiraz  a  young  man  of 
24,  Mirzd  'All  Muhammad,  who  took  the  title  of  the  Bab  (i.  e.,  "Gate"  or 
"Door"),  and  who  bore  much  the  same  relation  to  Bahd'u'llah  as  John  the 
Baptist  had  to  Christ.  He  publicly  announced  his  mission  and  began  to  teach 
and  train  a  band  of  disciples,  heralding  the  dawn  of  a  new  era  and  proclaiming 
the  coming  of  one  greater  than  himself,  whom  he  referred  to  as  "Him  Whom 
God  Shall  Manifest."  From  the  beginning  of  his  teaching  until  his  martyrdom, 
the  Bdb  exemplified  in  his  life  the  pure  spiritual  destiny  of  the  prophets  and 
messengers  cf  old.  Through  him  a  large  portion  of  the  Muslim  population  of 
Persia  became  imbued  with  the  new  faith,  but  against  him  gathered  the  fanatical 
hatred  of  the  Muslim  clergy  and  the  desperate  fear  of  the  civil  rulers.  He  was 
imprisoned,  scourged,  haled  before  tribunals,  dragged  from  one  place  of  confine- 
ment to  another,  and  at  last,  after  6  years  of  indignities  and  ill-treatment,  was 
condemned  to  death  as  a  heretic  to  the  principles  of  Islam.  His  execution  took 

glace  in  the  city  of  Tabriz,  where,  on  July  9,  1850,  he  was  publicly  shot  in  the 
arrack  square  together  with  one  of  his  followers. 

The  martyrdom  of  the  Bab  fanned  the  flame  of  enthusiasm  among  his  adherents 
and  they  grew  and  multiplied  despite  fierce  persecution.  Their  houses  were 
pillaged  and  destroyed,  their  wives  and  children  carried  off,  many  were  beheaded, 
blown  from  the  mouths  of  cannon,  burned,  or  chopped  to  pieces.  Over  20,000 
believers  gave  up  property,  families,  and  lives,  rather  than  deny  their  faith,  yet 
for  every  one  that  was  martyred,  many  joined  the  cause. 

Among  the  first  and  foremost  of  the  BaVs  supporters  was  Mirzd,  Husayn  t Ali, 
better  known  as  Bah&Vllah  (i.  e.,  Glory  of  God).  He  was  2  years  older  than 
the  Bab,  having  been  born  in  Teheran  on  November  12,  1817.  His  family  was 
one  of  the  noblest  and  oldest  in  Persia  and  his  own  goodness  and  generosity  had 
gained  for  him  the  title  of  "Father  of  the  poor,"  yet  this  did  not  prevent  his 
being  thrown  into  pvrison  when  he  espoused  the  cause  of  the  Bab.  When,  in 
1852,  there  arose  a  fresh  outbreak  of  persecution  against  the  Babis,  as  they  were 
called,  BahaVllah  bedame  the  target  for  all  the  bitterness  engendered  by  failure 
to  extinguish  the  new  light  of  faith.  Confined  in  a  filthy  underground  dungeon 
along  with  murderers  and  other  criminals,  loaded  with  chains,  bastinadoed,  he 
was  finally  exiled  with  his  family  and  a  handful  of  faithful  followers  to  Baghdad 
in  Mesopotamia.  A  few  months  later,  he  withdrew  into  the  wilderness,  where  he 
spent  2  years  in  prayer  and  meditation,  living  the  simple  life  of  the  dervish. 
After  his  return  his  fame  became  greater  than  ever.  People  flocked  to  Baghdad 
to  hear  him  and  the  Babi  movement  grew  rapidly  despite  all  efforts  of  the  Mullas 

i  This  statement  was  furnished  by  Horace  Holley,  secretary,  National  Spiritual  Assembly  of  the  BahS'is 
of  the  United  States  and  Canada,  Wilmette,  111. 


80  CENSUS   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

to  bring  about  its  extinction.  So  he  was  ordered  to  a  more  distant  exile,  first  in 
Constantinople,  then  in  Adrianople,  and  finally  confined  for  life  in  the  desolate 
barracks  of  'Akka1,  a  Turkish  penal  colony  on  the  Mediterranean,  south  of  Beirut 
and  facing  Mount  Carmel.  Here  he  instructed  a  large  number  of  disciples,  some 
of  them  coming  from  a  long  distance,  while  he  ministered  to  others  through  his 
writings. 

On  April  21,  1863,  in  the  garden  of  Ridvan  just  outside  Baghdad,  BahaVMh 
had  made  known  to  a  few  followers  that  he  was  the  one  proclaimed  and  promised 
by  the  Bab.  This  announcement  was  made  public  in  his  famous  Epistles  in 
Adrianople,  previous  to  the  journey  to  'Akka1,  in  1868.  Bv  this  event  the  B£bi 
movement  was  fulfilled  in  the  cause  of  Bahd/u'llah  and  the  streams  of  Christian 
and  Jewish  prophecy  united  with  the  inner  reality  of  the  Muslim  religion.  Baha- 
'u'll&h  gave  the  glad  tidings  to  East  and  West  that  the  day  of  God  had  dawned, 
that  a  new  and  universal  cycle  had  been  established — the  age  of  brotherhood,  of 
peace,  of  the  knowledge  of  God.  This  message  was  inscribed  in  Tablets,  or  Epistles, 
written  during  his  40  years  of  exile  and  imprisonment,  to  kings  and  rulers,  to 
representatives  of  the  several  religions,  to  his  own  followers  in  response  to  ques- 
tions, and  in  a  great  number  of  books  containing  the  essence  of  universal  religion, 
science,  and  philosophy.  In  the  annals  of  the  world,  no  spiritual  revelation  has 
been  made  under  such  conditions  of  personal  oppression  and  hardship.  The  effect 
of  Band'u'lla'h  upon  his  followers,  even  upon  his  enemies,  was  unique  and  inde- 
scribable. About  him  emanated  a  majesty  that  glorified  every  suffering,  an  awe 
that  penetrated  to  the  rudest  soul,  a  consecrated  love  that  pprtrayed  man  in  his 
ultimate  perfection. 

Bah&Vllah  ascended  in  1892,  leaving  a  testament  naming  as  his  successor  his 
eldest  surviving  son,  Abbots  Effendi,  better  known  as  'Abdu'l-Bah£  (Servant  of 
Baha1) .  From  early  childhood  he  shared  his  father's  labors,  and  later  became  the 
authoritative  interpreter  of  his  teachings.  By  his  singleness  of  devotion,  purity 
of  life,  tireless  effort,  humanitarian  love,  and  unfailing  wisdom,  the  Bahd'i  mes- 
sage slowly  but  surely  spread  to  all  parts  of  the  world.  His  confinement  at  'Akkd, 
lasting  40  years,  was  terminated  at  last  in  1908  by  the  overthrow  of  the  old 
regime  by  the  Young  Turks.  From  1911  to  1913  'Abdu'1-Bahd  journeyed  through 
Europe  and  America,  unfolding  before  numerous  audiences  the  spirit  of  the  new 
age.  In  these  addresses  the  message  of  Bah&'u'lla'h  is  developed  in  relation  to  the 
needs  of  civilization,  and  an  organic  harmony  is  created  between  religion,  science, 
economics,  and  social  order.  'Abdu;l-Bah£  expanded  the  religion  of  the  spirit 
to  include  all  the  functions  of  life,  destroying  forever  the  antagonism  between 
"religious"  and  "secular"  matters. 

During  the  World  War  communication  with  friends  and  believers  outside  Syria 
was  almost  completely  cut  off,  and  'Abdu'1-BaM  and  his  followers  suffered  great 
hardships.  During  those  dreary  years  the  resourcefulness  and  sagacious  philan- 
thropy of  'Abdu'l-Bah£  were  strikingly  shown.  He  personally  organized  exten- 
sive agricultural  operations  near  Tiberias,  bringing  under  cultivation  land  which 
had  been  untilled  for  centuries;  thus  he  secured  a  great  supply  of  wheat  by  means 
of  which  famine  was  averted,  not  only  for  the  Bah&'is,  but  for  many  of  the  poor 
of  all  religions,  whose  wants  he  liberally  supplied.  After  the  cessation  of  hos- 
tilities, a  knighthood  of  the  British  Empire  was  conferred  upon  him  in  recog- 
nition of  these  services.  His  manifold  activities  continued  with  little  abatement 
until  within  a  day  or  two  of  his  passing  peacefully  to  the  life  beyond,  on  November 
28,  1921,  at  the  age  of  77.  His  funeral  was  attended  by  thousands  of  all  ranks, 
from  the  Administrator-General  of  Palestine  and  the  Governor  of  Jerusalem  to 
the  poorest  beggars  of  Haifa.  Prominent  representatives  of  the  Muslim,  Christian, 
and  Jewish  communities  bore  eloquent  testimony  to  the  love  and  admiration  for 
his  life  and  work,  a  fitting  tribute  for  one  who  had  labored  all  his  days  for  unity 
of  religions,  of  races,  of  tongues. 

'Abdu'1-Bahd,  has  been  succeeded  in  the  leadership  of  the  movement  by  his 
eldest  grandson,  Shoghi  Effendi,  who  is  now  known  as  "Guardian  of  the  Cause." 

DOCTRINE 

The  Bah&'i  religion  stresses  the  principle  otf  the  Oneness  of  Mankind.  It  is  in 
the  light  of  this  principle  that  all  its  writings  are  to  be  viewed  and  the  purpose  of 
the  movement  considered.  That  a  spiritual  power  has  been  breathed  into  the 
soul  of  humanity  in  this  age,  which  shall  remove  all  causes  of  difference,  mis- 
understanding, discord,  and  disagreement — causes  resident  in  customs  and  insti- 
tutions as  well  as  in  personal  opinions  and  emotions — and  establish  the  means 
and  methods  as  well  as  the  desire  for  unity,  is  the  essence  of  the  Baha'i  teaching 


BAHl'lS  81 

and  faith.  This  principle  of  oneness  involves  so  many  readjustments,  mental, 
social,  and  spiritual,  that  the  wars  and  strifes  of  these  latter  times  have  been 
inevitable.  ( Abdu'1-Baha  gave  to  Bah&'u'llah's  message  an  interpretation 
directly  and  immediately  applying  to  the  nature  of  these  readjustments,  and 
setting  forth  the  following  principles: 

"Unfettered  search  after  truth  and  the  abandonment  of  all  superstition  and 
prejudice;  the  oneness  of  mankind — all  are  'leaves  of  one  tree,  flowers  in  one 
garden7;  religion  must  be  a  cause  of  love  and  harmony,  else  it  is  no  religion;  all 
religions  are  one  in  their  fundamental  principles;  religion  must  conform  with 
science,  bringing  faith  and  reason  into  full  accord;  and  recognition  of  the  unity 
of  God  and  obedience  to  His  commands  as  revealed  through  His  Divine  Mani- 
festations. 

"There  should  be  no  idle  rich  and  no  idle  poor;  every  one  should  have  an  occupa- 
tion, for  'work  in  the  spirit  of  service  is  worship/  Compulsory  education  is 
advocated,  especially  for  girls  who  will  be  the  mothers  and  the  first  educators  of 
the  next  generation.  In  all  walks  of  life,  both  sexes  should  have  equal  oppor- 
tunities for  development  and  equal  rights  and  privileges. 

"An  auxiliary  international  language  should  be  adopted  and  taught  in  all  the 
schools  in  order  to  bring  men  into  closer  fellowship  and  better  understanding. 
In  the  interest  of  universal  peace,  there  should  be  established  a  universal  league 
of  nations,  in  which  all  nations  and  peoples  should  be  included,  and  an  Inter- 
national Parliament  to  arbitrate  all  international  disputes." 

Thus  the  mission  of  Baha''u'lla*h  is  the  spiritual  unity  of  mankind.  While  he 
came  to  the  East,  his  mission  is  to  the  West  as  well,  and  his  teachings  are  suited 
to  all  classes  and  conditions  of  men.  At  present  there  are  Bah^is  located  not  only 
in  Muhammadan  countries,  but  also  throughout  Europe,  the  United  States,  and 
Canada;  and  this  phenomenal  spread  of  the  movement,  the  Baha'is  believe,  is 
due  to  the  fact  that  Bahd/u'llah  fulfilled  the  prophecies  of  all  religious  beliefs, 
both  past  and  present;  and  through  the  power  of  the  Baha'i  movement,  there 
is  being  created  a  new  religious  unity  in  the  world. 

ORGANIZATION 

The  Bahd/i  movement  has  no  ecclesiastical  organization.  It  holds  that  an  offi- 
cial clergy  tends  to  become  a  substitute  for  religion  rather  than  an  instrument  for 
carrying  spiritual  influence  into  the  world.  Propaganda  is  carried  on  by  means 
of  the  local  Baha"'i  communities  or  groups  in  which  believers  and  inquirers  meet 
at  stated  intervals  for  study  of  the  "Revealed  Words."  The  local  Bah&'i  com- 
munity is  given  official  recognition  only  after  its  number  of  adult  declared  believers 
exceeds  nine.  Up  to  this  point,  the  community  exists  as  a  voluntary  group  of 
workers  and  students.  This  local  group,  involving  as  it  does  men  and  women  in 
all  the  normal  activities  and  relations  of  life,  is  the  democratic  foundation  upon 
which  rests  the  entire  evolution  of  the  cause. 

The  responsibility  for  and  supervision  of  local  BaM'i  affairs  is  vested  in  a  body 
known  as  the  Spiritual  Assembly.  This  body  is  limited  to  nine  2  members  and  is 
elected  annually  on  April  21,  the  first  day  of  Ridv^n  (the  festival  commemorating 
the  declaration  of  Bah^Vlldh).  The  local  Spiritual  Assemblies  of  a  country  are 
linked  together  and  coordinated  through  another  elected  body  of  nine  members, 
the  National  Spiritual  Assembly.  'Abdu'l-Bahd's  instructions  provide  for  further 
development  of  Baha"7i  organization  through  an  International  Spiritual  Assembly 
(Baytu'l-'Adl,  i.  e.,  House  of  Justice)  elected  by  the  members  of  the  various 
National  Spiritual  Assemblies,  but  this  international  body  has  not  yet  come  into 
existence. 

To  assist  the  Guardian  (now  Shoghi  Effendi)  in  his  manifold  responsibilities 
and  duties  and  particularly  in  the  promotion  of  the  teaching  work,  'Abdu'1-Baha* 
provided  for  the  appointment  of  a  group  of  coworkers  to  be  known  as  "The  Hands 
of  the  Cause  of  God."  The  selection  of  this  body  is  a  function  of  the  Guardian, 
and  these  from  their  own  number  are  to  elect  nine  persons  who  will  be  closely 
associated  with  the  Guardian  in  the  discharge  of  his  duties ;  It  is  the  function  of 
the  Guardian  also  to  appoint  his  own  successor,  this  appointment  to  be  ratified 
by  nine  Hands  of  the  Cause. 

The  Bahd/is  have  inaugurated  a  new  calendar,  dating  their  era  from  the  year 
of  the  B£b's  declaration,  1844;  the  New  Year  falls  at  the  spring  equinox  (March  21) ; 
and  the  year  consists  of  19  months  of  19  days  each,  with  four  intercalary  days. 

2  In  BaM'i  symbology,  9  is  the  number  of  perfection. 


82  CJENStJS   OF   RELIGIOXJ'S  BODIES,    1936 

The  Baha'i  teachings  explicitly  forbid  the  appointment  of  a  professional  clergy. 
They  hold  that  spiritual  instruction  should  not  be  sold,  and  their  teachers  have  no 
authority  over  the  conscience  of  any  member  of  the  cause.  The  greatest  privilege 
of  a  believer,  after  securing  his  own  financial  independence,  is  to  serve  voluntarily 
and  without  pay  as  a  teacher  under  the  supervision  of  a  local  or  National  Spiritual 
Assembly. 

WORK 

The  Baha'i  faith  works  for  the  betterment  of  mankind  and  the  establishment 
of  a  world  civilization.  The  objects  of  the  Baha'i  cause  are  identical  with  the 
true  objects  of  all  revealed  religion;  to  raise  man  from  the  earthly  to  the  heavenly 
condition;  to  substitute  spiritual  laws  and  realities  for  natural  laws  and  realities 
operating  in  the  darkness  of  unfaith;  to  initiate  a  new  age  and  era  of  progress  and 
attainment  in  the  world  of  mind;  and  to  transform  civilization  into  the  glory  of 
the  kingdom.  To  this  end  it  patiently  endeavors  to  remold  the  world. 

The  Baha'is  in  America  have  established  a  national  center,  a  temple  of  worship, 
called  the  Mashriqu'l-Adhk^r  (Dawning  Place  of  God's  Praise).  This  is  now  in 
process  of  completion  at  Wilmette,  a  suburb  of  Chicago.  The  temple  proper  or 
sanctuary  for  prayer  and  praise  will  be  surrounded  by  accessory  buildings  of 
humanitarian  intent,  including  schools,  hospitals,  homes  for  orphans  and  the 
aged,  and  a  university  for  the  study  of  the  higher  sciences  and  arts.  The  relation 
of  all  these  buildings  one  with  another  and  with  the  central  edifice  discloses  the 
relation  of  the  organic  functions  of  society  with  the  spirit  of  religion.  The 
Mashriqu'l-Adhkar  perfectly  symbolizes  the  twofold  nature  of  religion — one 
aspect  the  turning  to  God,  the  other  aspect  service  to  man. 

In  addition  to  the  house  of  worship,  the  American  Baha'is  operate  summer 
schools  at  Green  Acre,  Eliot,  Maine;  Geyserville,  Calif.;  and  Davison,  Mich. 
About  20  of  the  88  local  assemblies  are  now  incorporated  under  their  respective 
State  statutes. 


BAPTIST  BODIES 


GENERAL  STATEMENT 

It  is  a  distinct  principle  with  Baptists  that  they  acknowledge  no  human  founder, 
recognize  no  human  authority,  and  subscribe  to  no  human  creed.  For  all  these 
things,  Baptists  of  every  name  and  order  go  back  to  the  New  Testament.  And 
while  no  competent  Baptist  historian  assumes  to  be  able  to  trace  a  succession  of 
Baptist  churches  through  the  ages,  most  of  them  are  of  one  accord  in  believing 
that,  if  we  could  secure  the  records,  there  would  be  found  heroic  groups  of  be- 
lievers in  every  age  who  upheld  with  their  testimonies  and,  in  many  cases,  with 
their  lives,  the  great  outstanding  and  distinctive  principles  of  the  Baptist  churches 
of  today. 

As  soon^as  the  Reformation  gave  men  opportunity  to  interpret  the  teachings 
of  the  Scriptures  for  themselves,  and  to  embody  their  convictions  in  speech  and 
act,  persons  holding  Baptist  doctrines  immediately  began  to  appear.  In  the 
first  quarter  of  the  sixteenth  century,  they  were  found  in  Germany  and  Switzer- 
land, and  were  called  Anabaptists  (Re-baptizers) ,  because  they  insisted  that 
persons  baptized  in  infancy  must,  upon  profession  of  conversion,  and  in  order  to 
gain  admission  into  church  fellowship,  be  baptized  again,  although  they  do  not 
appear  to  have  insisted  always  on  immersion.  These  early  Anabaptists  were  in 
the  main  of  high  character,  though  in  some  instances  they  held  doctrines  which 
led  to  fanatical  outbreaks  which  aroused  no  little  prejudice  against  them. 

Gradually,  in  spite  of  severe  persecution,  the  Anabaptists  grew  in  numbers. 
Some  of  them,  driven  from  Germany,  found  refuge  in  the  Low  Countries  and 
these  were  gathered,  under  the  lead  of  Menno  Simons,  into  the  groups  of  Men- 
nonites  who  passed  over  into  England,  and  doubtless  played  an  important  part 
in  giving  currency  to  Baptist  principles.  To  their  influence,  in  all  probability, 
the  English  Baptists  owe  their  first  churches,  established  in  Amsterdam  in  1608 
and  in  London  in  1611.  Glimpses  of  them  appear  in  the  days  preceding  the 
Commonwealth,  and  during  the  Cromwellian  period  they  became  more  prominent. 
It  was  due  to  this  Mennonite  influence  that  the  early  Baptist  churches  in  England 
were  Arminian  rather  than  Calvinistic  in  type,  and  were  termed  General  Baptists, 
indicating  belief  in  a  universal  atonement,  in  distinction  from  Particular  Baptists, 
indicating  a  limited  atonement.  The  first  Calvinistic  or  Particular  Baptist 
church  was  formed  in  London  in  1638,  its  members  seceding  peaceably  from  an 
older  Separatist  congregation.  In  1641  a  further  secession  from  the  same  Sepa- 
ratist church  occurred,  and  the  new  group  became  convinced  from  study  of  the 
New  Testament  that  the  apostolic  baptism  was  immersion.  They  sent  one  of 
their  number  to  Holland,  where  he  was  immersed  by  a  minister  of  the  Collegiate 
Church  at  Rhynsberg,  where  the  practice  of  immersion  had  been  introduced,  and 
on  his  return  the  rest  of  the  church  were  immersed.  Gradually  this  practice  was 
adopted  by  all  the.  Baptist  churches  and  became  in  the  popular  mind  their  dis- 
tinguishing feature.  The  General  and  Particular  Baptists  were  united  in  1891. 

The  first  Baptist  Church  in  America  was  probably  established  by  Roger  Wil- 
liams, the  "Apostle  of  Religious  Liberty,"  in  Providence,  R.  L,  in  1639,  although 
this  honor  is  disputed  by  the  First  Baptist  Church  of  Newport,  R.  I.,  organized, 
it  is  claimed,  by  Dr.  John  Clarke  as  pastor,  in  1638.  Roger  Williams  was  a  Sepa- 
ratist minister  who  came  to  the  Massachusetts  Colony  in  1631,  and  was  banished 
from  that  colony  because  "he  broached  and  divulged  new  and  dangerous  opinions 
against  the  authority  of  magistrates."  Having  established  himself  at  Providence, 
he  adopted  essentially  Baptist  views  and  soon  gathered  a  number  of  converts  to 
this  faith.  As  there  was  no  Baptist  church  in  existence  in  America  at  that  time,  he 
baptized  Ezekiel  Holliman,  who  thereupon  baptized  him.  Williams  then  baptized 
10  others,  and  this  company  of  Baptist  believers  organized  themselves  into  a 
church.  John  Clarke  came  from  New  Hampshire  to  Newport  about  the  same 
time,  and,  apparently  without  any  connection  with  the  work  of  Williams,  estab- 
lished a  Baptist  church  in  that  town. 

83 

275318—41 7 


84  CENSUS'  OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

These  early  American  Baptist  churches  belonged  to  the  Particular,  or  Cal- 
vinistic, branch.  Later,  Arminian  views  became  widely  spread  for  a  time,  but 
ultimately  the  Calvinistic  view  of  the  atonement  was  generally  accepted  by  the 
main  body  of  Baptists  in  the  Colonies.  The  divisions  which  now  exist  began  to 
make  their  appearance  at  a  relatively  early  date.  In  1652  the  church  at  Provi- 
dence divided,  one  party  organizing  a  church  which  marked  the  beginning  of  the 
General  Six  Principle  Baptists.  The  Seventh  Day  Baptist  body  organized  its 
first  church  at  Newport  in  1671.  Arminianism  practically  disappeared  from  the 
Baptist  churches  of  New  England  about  the  middle  of  the  eighteenth  century, 
but  General  Baptists  were  found  in  Virginia  before  17J.4,  and  this  branch  gained 
a  permanent  foothold  in  the  South.  As  a  result  of  the  revival  movement,  gen- 
erally known  as  the  New  Light  movement,  which  followed  George  Whitefield's 
visit  to  New  England  in  1740,  the  Separate  Baptists  came  into  existence  and  at 
one  time  were  very  numerous.  The  Free  Baptists,1  in  1779,  once  more  gave  a 
general  and  widely  accepted  expression  in  New  England  to  the  Arminian  view  of 
the  atonement. 

Soon  after  the  Revolutionary  War,  the  question  of  the  evangelization  of  the 
Negro  race  assumed  importance,  and  a  Colored  Baptist  church  was  organized  in 
1788.  With  the  general  revival  movement  at  the  close  of  the  eighteenth  and  the 
beginning  of  the  nineteenth  centuries,  to  which  the  Free  Baptists  owed  no  small 
part  of  their  growth,  there  developed,  especially  in  the  mountain  sections  of  the 
Middle  West  and  in  the  Southern  States,  a  reaction  toward  a  sterner  Calvinism, 
which,  combined  with  the  natural  Baptist  emphasis  upon  individualism,  pro- 
duced a  number  of  associations  strictly,  even  rigidly,  Calvinistic,  some  of  them 
going  to  the  extent  of  dualism,  as  in  the  doctrine  of  the  Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit 
Predestinarian  Baptists. 

About  the  same  time,  as  missionary  work  became  organized  into  societies, 
many  of  these  associations  opposed,  not  so  much  mission  work  itself,  as  its  or- 
ganization, through  fear  of  a  developing  ecclesiasticism.  These  were  variously 
termed  "Old  School/'  "Antimission,"  "Hard  Shell,"  and  "Primitive"  Baptists; 
but  gradually  the  term  "Primitive"  became  the  most  widely  known  and  adopted. 
In  contradistinction  to  these,  the  associations,  or  churches,  which  approved  of 
missionary  societies,  came  to  be  designated  Missionary  Baptists,  though  there 
was  no  definite  denominational  organization  under  that  name. 

The  denominations  mentioned,  however,  do  not  represent  all  who  hold  Baptist 
views,  for  during  the  revival  period  just  referred  to,  the  Disciples  of  Christ  and 
the  Churches  of  Christ  arose,  and  they  have  many  things  in  common  with  Baptists, 
although  they  differ  from  the  other  bodies  in  some  interpretations.  With  them 
also  may  be  classed  the  Adventists,  the  Brethren  (Dunker,  Plymouth,  and  River), 
Mennonites,  and  certain  other  bodies.  The  Armenian  and  Eastern  Orthodox 
churches  practice  baptism  by  immersion,  but  do  not  limit  it  to  those  of  mature 
years. 

It  thus  appears  that  a  survey  of  Baptist  bodies  should  include  not  only  those 
which  make  the  term  an  integral  part  of  their  title,  but  some  which  are  not 
ordinarily  classed  with  them.  It  is  also  evident  that  among  those  who  accept 
the  name  Baptists  there  are  many  differences,  some  of  great  importance.  Sev- 
enth Day  Baptists  agree  with  other  Baptist  bodies  except  in  regard  to  the  Sab- 
bath, but  the  distinction  between  Primitive  Baptists  and  Free  Will  Baptists  is 
much  more  marked  than  between  Baptists  and  Disciples.  Any  presentation  of 
the  strength  of  Baptist  denominations  must  take  into  account  these  divergencies. 

By  far  the  largest  body  of  Baptists,  not  only  in  the  United  States  but  in  the 
world,  is  that  popularly  known  as  "Baptist,"  though  frequently  referred  to,  and 
listed  in  the  census  of  1890,  as  "Regular  Baptists."  Other  Baptist  bodies  prefix 
some  descriptive  adjective,  such  as  "Primitive,"  "United,"  "General,"  "Free 
Will,"  etc.,  but  this,  which  is  virtually  the  parent  body,  commonly  has  no  such 
qualification.  Its  churches,  however,  are  ordinarily  spoken  of  as  "Northern," 
"Southern,"  and  "Colored."  This  does  not  imply  any  divergence  in  doctrine  or 
ecclesiastical  order.  All  are  one  in  these  respects.  It  is  rather  a  distinction 
adopted  for  administrative  purposes,  and  based  upon  certain  local  or  racial  charac- 
teristics and  conditions,  the  recognition  of  which  implies  no  lack  of  fellowship  or 
of  unanimity  of  purpose.  Should  these  distinctions  cease  to  exist,  there  is  nothing 
whatever  to  prevent  the  same  unity  in  matters  of  administration  which  now  exists 
in  belief,  fellowship,  and  ecclesiastical  practice. 


*  In  1926  the  Free  Baptist  churches  were  included  with  those  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 


BAPTISE  BODIES' 


85 


STATISTICS 

The  denominations  grouped  as  Baptists  in  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906  are  listed 
in  the  table  following,  with  the  principal  statistics  as  reported  for  the  four  periods. 

In  1926  certain  changes  were  noted:  Under  Negro  Baptists  were  included  the 
former  National  Baptist  Convention,  later  the  National  Baptist  Convention, 
U.  S.  A.;  the  National  Baptist  Convention  of  America;  the  Lott-Carey  Missionary 
Baptists;  and  those  colored  Baptist  churches  that  were  formerly  reported  with  the 
Northern  Baptist  Convention.  The  Free  Baptists  of  the  1916  report  became  a 
part  of  the  Northern  Convention.  A  new  body  was  organized,  under  the  name 
Independent  Baptist  Church  of  America;  and  a  new  denomination  came  out  of 
the  Southern  Baptist  Convention,  called  the  American  Baptist  Association. 

In  1936  it  will  be  noted  that  the  General  Association  of  Regular  Baptist  Churches 
in  the  United  States  of  America,  composed  of  churches  which  withdrew  from 
fellowship  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention,  appears  for  the  first  time* 
The  National  Baptist  Evangelical  Life  and  Soul  Saving  Assembly  of  the  United 
States  of  America,  composed  of  churches  which  withdrew  from  the  National 
Baptist  Convention,  U.  S.  A.,  is  reported  for  the  first  time.  The  Seventh  Day 
Baptists  (German,  1728),  which  appeared  in  previous  census  reports  with  the 
German  Baptist  Brethren  (Bunkers),  is  now  shown  with  the  Baptist  bodies. 
The  Free  Will  Baptists  (Bullockites)  did  not  report  as  they  no  longer  hold  meet- 
ings. These  statistics  were  compiled  from  schedules  sent  directly  to  the  Bureau 
by  the  pastor  or  clerk  of  the  individual  churches  and  the  data  relate  to  these 
churches  only. 

SUMMAKY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  BAPTIST  BODIES,    1936,    1926,    1916,   AND    1906 


DENOMINATION  AND  CENSUS  YEAR 

Total  number  of 
churches 

§ 

"S 

fc 

VALUE"  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

ra 

(•* 

M 

o 
DQ 

1936 

Total             

49,  478 

8,  362,  287 

44,251 

$389,  661,  696 

47,  517 

$55,779,246 

19,  577,  463 
19,630,844 
14,978,506 
2,548 

85,027 
192,  620 

79,712 
103,799 
10,  553 

24,023 
15,448 

5,333 
157,  530 

207,352 
660 

1,189 
352,529 

451 

42,  876 

4,382,097 

Baptist  bodies: 
Northern  Baptist  Cbnventjon.. 
Southern  Baptist  Convention.. 
Negro  Baptists  __    __     .. 

6,284 
1  13,815 
23,  093 
4 

66 
920 

226 
422 
69 

266 
277 

91 
1,726 

1,009 
16 

8 
1,064 

7 

1,329,044 
2,700,155 
3,782,464 
294 

6,698 
76,  643 

19,  616 
36,  573 

5,287 

17,186 
27,000 

7,951 
69,157 

43,897 
201 

129 
115,  022 

188 

5,922 
12,370 
21,  045 
4 

57 
692 

207 
297 
52 

173 
161 

68 
1,365 

876 
13 

4 

848 

4 

167,  576,  463 
117,  766,  295 
93,798,181 
15,  500 

727,  285 
1,090,779 

468,883 
555,  309 
66,  670 

234,595 
179,215 

49,  615 
2,180,047 

1,643,804 
6,600 

9,300 
1,507,798 

1,450 

6,168 
13,521 
22,652 
4 

64 
843 

226 
406 
59 

186 
188 

58 
1,054 

935 
10 

7 
1,020 

5 

5,904 
12,  161 
21,976 
3 

52 
699 

200 
301 
55 

54 
73 

20 
41 

422 

892,872 
1,  664,  105 
1,  656,  638 
205 

3,306 
42,455 

8,317 
17,  562 
2,932 

3,358 
4,929 

992 
2,631 

13^  572 

General  S/x  Principle  Baptists  - 
Seventh  Day  Baptists  

Free  Will  Baptists 

United  American  Free  Will 
Baptist  Church  (Colored)  
General  Baptists  * 

Separate  Baptists 

Regular  Baptists 

United  B  aptists  _    

Duck  River  and  Kindred  As- 
sociations of  Baptists  (Bap- 
tist Church  of  Christ)      . 

Primitive  Baptists  

Colored  Primitive  Baptists  
Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit  Predes- 
tinarian  Baptists 

Independent  Baptist  Church  of 
America  

3 

798 

3 

27 
50,008 

112 

American  Baptist  Association  — 
Christian  Unity  Baptist  Asso- 
ciation    ,. 

i  Exclusive  of  statistics  for  30  churches  belonging  to  the  Columbia  Association — 24  in  the  District  of 
Columbia  and  6  in  the  State  of  Maryland — which  are  reported  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 


86 


CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  BAPTIST   BODIES,  1936,  1926,  1916,  AND   1906 — 

Continued 


DENOMINATION  AND  CENSUS  TEAE 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

+a 

<! 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

% 
£ 

ta 

1936—  Continued 

Baptist  bodies—  Continued. 
General  Association  of  Regular 
Baptist    Churches    in    the 
United  States  of  America  
Seventh  Day  Baptists  (Ger- 
man, 1728)  a 

84 
3 

28 
60,192 

22,345 
137 

2,300 
8,440,922 

71 
2 

20 
52,  281 

$1,694,448 
5,000 

84,  459 
469,  827,  795 

185,  370,  576 
173,  456,  965 
103,  465,  759 
20,500 

668,  200 
1,  156,  743 

308,  425 

1,500 
706,  325 

63,650 
647,  550 
144,  665 

51,  175 
1,  730,  348 

171,  518 
19,  350 

12,  000 
1,  832,  546 

198,  364,  747 

83 
2 

26 

54,  145 

$340,376 
382 

12,  901 
98,  045,  096 

34,  318,  486 
42,  904,  563 
19,  475,  981 
3,046 

132,  068 
252,  613 

67,  773 

100 
113,  825 

9,292 
55,  610 

15,  094 

5,362 
166,  847 

39,  419 
473 

2,499 
482,  045 

40,  027,  119 

16,  082,  462 
15,  063,  743 
8,  361,  919 
2,483 

67,  695 
123,  363 

75,  835 
36,  647 

275 

64,  698 
9,468 
11,855 
4,837 

2,518 

96,  270 
22,  881 

170 

83 
2 

26 

47,  889 

17,  021 
105 

950 
4,  654,  241 

National  Baptist  Evangelical 
Life  and  Soul   Saving  As- 
sembly of  the  United  States 
of  America  _    __    _    

1936 

Total  

Baptist  bodies: 
Northern  Baptist  Convention.. 
Southern  Baptist  Convention.. 
Negro  Baptists 

7,611 
23,  374 
22,081 

67 
1,024 

166 

2 

465 

65 
349 
221 

98 
2,267 

925 
27 

13 
1,431 

57,  828 

1,289,966 
3,524,378 
3,196,623 
293 

7,264 
79,  592 

13,  396 

36 
31,  501 

4,803 
23,091 
18,  903 

7,340 
81,  374 

43,  978 
304 

222 
117,  858 

7,  153,  313 

7,297 
21,  128 
19,  833 
6 

58 
765 

142 

1 
353 

43 
233 
139 

75 
1,037 

87 
24 

6 
1,054 

50,  716 

7,380 
22,  338 
20,  209 
5 

65 
872 

158 

1 
440 

41 
223 

147 

46 
776 

111 
20 

10 
1»303 

51,  797 

6,999 
19,882 
18,  755 
5 

57 
643 

144 

1 

295 

37 
65 
39 

14 
5 

24 

1,052,794 
2,  345,  630 
1,  121,  362 
229 

4,033 
38,  199 

5,077 

15 
18,  797 

1,782 
4,690 
2,005 

795 
181 

2,278 

General  Six  Principle  Baptists- 
Seventh  Day  Baptists  ._ 

Free  Will  Baptists 

United  American  Free  Will 
Baptist  Church  (Colored)  
Free  Will  Baptists  (Bullock- 
i'tes)  _    .          

General  Baptists  

Separate  Baptists 

Regular  Baptists  

United  Baptists 

Duck  River  and  Kindred  As- 
sociations of  Baptists  (Bap- 
tist Church  of  Christ) 

Primitive  Baptists 

Colored  Primit  ive  Baptists  
Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit  Predes- 
tinarian  Baptists  

Independent  Baptist  Church 
of  America  ._ 

6 

918 

46,  1G8 

7,517 
17,  555 
19,909 
6 

66 
141 
390 
87 

1 

305 
30 
50 
16 

8 

146 
56,  228 

3,  946,  888 

1,  028,  952 
1,  666,  996 
1,  181,  270 
276 

5,005 
11,  642 
22,421 
4,168 

12 

18,  545 
1,711 
2,587 
701 

399 

American  Baptist  Association.  . 
1916 
Total 

Baptist  bodies: 
Northern  Baptist  Convention.  _ 
Southern  Baptist  Convention.  _ 
National  Baptist  Convention  ... 
General  Six  Principle  Baptists, 

Seventh  Day  Baptists 

8,148 
23,580 
21,  071 
10 

68 
171 
750 
169 

12 

517 
46 
401 
254 

105 

2,142 
336 

48 

1,232,135 
2,708,870 
2,  938,  579 
456 

7,980 
12,  570 
54,833 
13,  362 

184 

33,466 
4,254 
21,  521 
22,097 

6,872 

80,311 
15,  144 

679 

7,748 
19,  268 
20,  117 
10 

59 
159 
656 
164 

6 

390 
40 
189 
82 

49 

1,580 
164 

35 

94,  644,  133 
58,  348,  373 
41,184,920 
25,  850 

307,  600 
670,  720 
517,  240 
178,  385 

3,450 

421,  837 
47,  565 
141.  480 
52,  147 

40,  600 

1,601,807 
154,  690 

23,  950 

7,848 
21,  078 
19,  988 
6 

64 
153 
612 
168 

3 

424 
33 
143 
69 

67 

964 
170 

7 

Free  Baptists  __        _  ._ 

Free  Will  Baptists 

Colored  Free  Will  Baptists  
Free  Will  Baptists  (Bulloek- 
ites)  

General  Baptists 

Separate  Baptists 

Regular  Baptists 

United  Baptists 

Duck  River  and  Kindred  As- 
sociations of  Baptists  (Bap- 
tist Church  of  Christ) 

Primitive  Baptists  

Colored  Primitive  Baptists  
Two-Seed-in-the-Spint  Predes- 
tinarian  Baptists  

87 

3,201 

included  with  Brethren  Bodies  in  1926, 1916,  and  1906. 


BAPTIST  BODIES' 


87 


SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  BAPTIST  BODIES,  1936,  1926,  1916,  AND  1906 — 

Continued 


DENOMINATION  AND  CENSUS  YEAE 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICE3 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

1 

Churches  re- 
porting 

§ 

1 

1906 

Total  

54,707 

5,662,234 

49,  329 

$139,  842,  656 

74,  620,  025 
34,  723,  882 
24,  437,  272 
19,  450 

292,  250 
2,  974,  130 
296,  585 

6,900 
252,  019 

66,  980 
36,  715 

44,  321 
1,  674,  810 

296,  539 
21,  500 
79,  278 

41,  165 

2,898,914 

Baptist  bodies: 
Northern  Baptist  Convention— 
Southern  Baptist  Convention.  . 
National  Baptist  Convention.- 
General  Six  Principle  Baptists. 

Seventh  Day  Baptists 

8,247 
21,075 
18,492 
16 

76 
1,338 
608 

15 
518 

73 
190 

92 
2,878 

787 
55 
247 

1,  052,  105 
2,  009,  471 
2,  261,  607 
685 

8,381 
81,  359 
40,280 

298 
30,097 

5,180 
13,  698 

6,416 
102,  311 

35,076 
781 
14,  489 

7,795 
18,  672 
17,  890 
13 

68 
1,092 
554 

8 
380 

59 
75 

86 
1,953 

501 
32 
151 

7,346 
14,  371 

17,  478 
9 

67 
1,059 
263 

1 
230 

45 

21 

9 

851,269 
1,  014,  690 
924,  665 
414 

5,117 
65,  101 
12,  720 

25 
11,  658 

1,962 
1,360 

402 

Free  Baptists  . 

Free  Will  Baptists  _ 

Free  Will  Baptists  (Bullock- 
ites) 

General  Baptists 

Separate  Baptists  

United  Baptists 

Duck  River  and  Kindred  As- 
sociations of  Baptists  (Bap- 
tist Church  of  Christ)  

Primitive  Baptists 

Colored  Primitive  Baptists  in 
America 

166 

6,224 

Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit  Predes- 
tinarian  Baptists 

United  American  Free  Will 
Baptists  (Colored) 

100 

3,307 

BAPTISTS 
HISTORY 

The  history  of  the  early  Baptist  churches  in  New  England  is  one  of  constant 
struggle  for  existence.  The  Puritan  government  of  Massachusetts  was  so  bitter 
in  its  opposition  that  nearly  a  century  after  Roger  Williams  there  were  but  eight 
Baptist  churches  in  that  colony.  Conditions  elsewhere  were  similar,  although 
farther  south  there  was  less  persecution.  Down  to  the  middle  of  the  eighteenth 
century  it  seemed  probable  that  the  General,  or  Arminian,  wing  would  be  domi- 
nant in  New  England  at  least,  although  in  Philadelphia  the  controversy  had  re- 
sulted in  a  victory  for  the  Calvinists.  With  the  Great  Awakening  in  1740,  and 
the  labors  of  Whitefield,  two  significant  changes  appeared  in  Baptist  church 
life.  Calvinistic  views  began  to  predominate  in  the  New  England  churches,  and 
the  bitter  opposition  to  the  Baptists  disappeared.  By  1784  the  8  churches  ^in 
Massachusetts  had  increased  to  73,  and  extension  into  the  neighboring  colonies 
had  begun.  With  this  growth,  however,  there  developed  a  conflict  similar  to 
that  found  in  the  history  of  other  denominations.  The  "New  Lights,"  later 
known  as  "Separates,"  were  heart  and  soul  with  Whitefield  in  his  demands  for 
a  regenerated  church  membership;  the  "Old  Lights,"  or  "Regulars,"  earnestly 
opposed  the  introduction  of  hitherto  unrecognized  qualifications  for  the  ministry 
or,  indeed,  for  church  membership.  From  New  England  the  movement  spread, 
becoming  for  a  time  especially  strong  in  several  Southern  States.  In  the  South 
the  two  parties  eventually  united  in  fellowship,  and  reorganized  as  United  Bap- 
tists. In  New  England  the  conflict  wore  itself  out,  the  Baptist  churches  being 
modified  by  both  influences. 


88  CENSUS1  OF  EELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

With  the  general  emancipation  from  ecclesiastical  rule  that  followed  the  Revo- 
lutionary War,  all  disabilities  were  removed  from  the  Baptists  in  the  different 
States,  and  the  new  Federal  Constitution  effaced  the  last  vestige  of  religious 
inequality.  Under  the  influence  of  the  later  preaching  of  Whitefield,  the  close 
of  the  eighteenth  century  was  marked  by  a  renewal  of  revival  interest,  and  a 
new  development  of  the  Arminian  type  of  Baptist  churches.  For  some  time  the 
Free  Baptists,  or  Free  Will  Baptists,  as  they  were  variously  called,  drew  consid- 
erable strength  from  the  Regular  Baptists,  but  the  latter  soon  became  as  strong 
as  ever. 

The  next  significant  movement  in  the  Baptist  churches  was  that  connected 
with  the  development  of  foreign  missions.  In  1792  the  Baptists  of  England  had 
organized  a  missionary  society  to  send  William  Carey  to  India,  and  many  of 
the  Baptist  churches  in  the  United  States  had  become  interested  in  the  move- 
ment and  contributed  toward  its  support.  The  first  foreign  missionary  society  in 
America  was  the  American  Board,  organized  in  1810,  in  which  Congregational, 
Presbyterian,  Reformed,  and  other  churches  united,  and  among  its  first  mis- 
sionaries were  Adoniram  Judson,  his  wife,  and  Luther  Rice.  Knowing  that  in 
India  they  were  to  meet  Baptists,  they  made  special  study  of  Baptist  doctrine, 
and  before  landing  came  to  the  conclusion  that  believers7  baptism  by  immersion 
was  the  true  method.  Judson  immediately  sent  word  of  their  change  of  view, 
and  Rice  soon  after  returned  to  America  to  present  the  cause  of  Baptist  mis- 
sions, and  succeeded  in  arousing  much  interest  in  the  churches.  To  meet  the 
new  conditions  it  became  evident  that  some  organization  was  essential,  and  in 
1814  the  General  Missionary  Convention  of  the  Baptist  Denomination  in  the 
United  States  of  America  for  Foreign  Missions  was  formed. 

The  missionary  work  of  this  organization,  however,  represented  only  a  part  of 
its  scope  or  achievement.  It  was,  indeed,  the  first  step  toward  bringing  the 
various  local  churches  together  and  overcoming  the  disintegrating  tendencies  of 
extreme  independence.  Heretofore  the  Baptists  alone  had  had  no  form  of 
ecclesiastical  organization.  Now,  through  the  necessities  of  administration, 
there  was  furnished  just  what  was  needed  to  combine  the  different  units  into  a 
whole,  and  arouse  what  has  come  to  be  known  as  "denominational  consciousness." 
For  a  time  this  convention  undertook  to  care  also  for  home  missions,  which  had 
already  been  carried  on  in  a  somewhat  desultory  manner  through  a  Domestic 
Missionary  Society  in  Massachusetts  and  a  similar  one  in  New  York.  With  the 
increasing  migration  westward  and  the  rapid  development  of  the  States,  both 
North  and  South,  the  tax  upon  the  convention,  in  addition  to  its  foreign  mission- 
ary interests,  became  too  great,  and  it  was  deemed  advisable  to  organize  a  home 
missionary  society,  which  was  done  in  1832.  With  the  development  of  interest 
in  publication,  a  tract  society  had  been  formed  in  1824,  which  in  1840  was  renamed 
the  American  Baptist  Publication  Society. 

As  the  discussion  in  regard  to  slavery  became  acute,  there  arose  the  differences 
which  resulted  in  three  conventions — northern,  southern,  and  national.  "The 
northern  churches,  Baptist  as  well  as  others,  were  strongly  antislavery;  the 
southern  churches,  Baptist  as  well  as  others,  were,  if  not  always  proslavery,' 
certainly  not  antislavery.  A  crisis  was  reached  when  the  question  was  raised 
whether  the  General  Missionary  Convention  (called  also  the  Triennial  Convention 
because  it  met  once  in  3  years)  would  appoint  as  a  missionary  a  person  who 
owned  slaves.  To  this  a  very  decided  negative  was  returned,  and  since  that 
involved  a  denial  of  what  were  considered  constitutional  rights,  the  southern 
churches  withdrew  in  1845  and  formed  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention,1 
whose  purpose  was  to  do  for  the  southern  Baptist  churches  just  what  the  general 
convention  had  hitherto  done  for  the  entire  Baptist  denomination.  It  was  not 
a  new  denomination;  simply  a  new  organization  for  the  direction  of  the  missionary 
an'd  general  evangelistic  work  of  the  churches  of  the  Southern  States. 

The  development  of  the  National  Baptist  Convention,  representing  the  Negro 
churches,  was  naturally  slower,  and  when  the  census  of  Baptists  for  1926  was 
taken  numerous  divisions  made  it  necessary  to  use  the  new  term,  "Negro 
Baptists/'  which  for  statistical  purposes  includes  all  the  various  organizations 
known  as  the  "National  Baptist  Convention,  U.  S.  A.,"  the  "National  Baptist 
Convention  of  America,"  the  "Lott-Carey  Missionary  Baptists/'  and  the  colored 
Baptist  churches,  that  were  formerly  included  in  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 

»  See  p.  140. 


BAPTISE   BODIES!  89 

DOCTRINE 

Baptists  agree  with  other  evangelical  bodies  on  many  points  of  doctrine. 
Their  cardinal  principle  is  implicit  obedience  to  the  plain  teachings  of  the  Word 
of  God.  Under  this  principle,  while  maintaining  with  other  evangelical  bodies 
the  great  truths  of  the  Christian  religion,  they  hold:  (1)  That  the  churches  are 
independent  in  their  local  affairs;  (2)  that  there  should  be  an  entire  separation  of 
church  and  state;  (3)  that  religious  liberty  or  freedom  in  matters  of  religion  is 
an  inherent  right  of  the  human  soul;  (4)  that  a  church  is  a  body  of  regenerated 
people  who  have  been  baptized  on  profession  of  personal  faith  in  Christ,  and 
have  associated  themselves  in  the  fellowship  of  the  gospel;  (5)  that  infant  baptism 
is  not  only  not  taught  in  the  Scriptures,  but  is  fatal  to  the  spirituality  of  the 
church;  (6)  that  from  the  meaning  of  the  word  used  in  the  Greek  text  of  the 
Scriptures,  the  symbolism  of  the  ordinance,  and  the  practice  of  the  early  church, 
immersion  in  water  only  constitutes  baptism;  (7)  that  the  scriptural  officers  of  a 
church  are  pastors  and  deacons;  and  (8)  that  the  Lord's  Supper  is  an  ordinance 
within  the  church  observed  in  commemoration  of  the  sufferings  and  death  of  Christ. 

The  beliefs  of  Baptists  have  been  incorporated  in  confessions  of  faith.  Of 
these,  the  Philadelphia  Confession,  originally  issued  by  the  London  Baptist 
churches  in  1689  and  adopted  with  some  enlargements  by  the  Philadelphia  Asso- 
ciation in  1742,  and  the  New  Hampshire  Confession,  adopted  by  the  New  Hamp- 
shire State  Convention  in  1832,  are  recognized  as  the  most  important.  The 
Philadelphia  Confession  is  strongly  Calvinistic.  The  New  Hampshire  Confession 
modifies  some  of  the  statements  of  the  earlier  documents,  and  may  be  character- 
ized as  moderately  Calvinistic.  But  while  these  confessions  are  recognized  as 
fair  expressions  of  the  faith  of  Baptists,  there  is  nothing  binding  in  them,  and  they 
are  not  regarded  as  having  any  special  authority.  The  final  court  of  appeal  for 
Baptists  is  the  Word  of  God.  Within  limits,  considerable  differences  in  doctrine 
are  allowed,  and  thus  opportunity  is  given  to  modify  beliefs  as  new  light  may 
break  from  or  upon  the  Word.  Among  Baptists  heresy  trials  are  rare. 

ORGANIZATION 

Baptist  Church  polity  is  congregational,  or  independent.  Each  church  is 
sovereign  so  far  as  its  own  discipline  and  worship  are  concerned,  calls  or  dismisses 
its  own  pastor,  elects  its  own  deacons  or  other  officers,  and  attends  to  its  own 
affairs.  Admission  to  church  membership  is  by  vote  of  the  church,  usually  after 
examination  of  the  candidate  by  the  church  committee.  There  is  no  specific  age 
limit,  but  each  applicant  must  have  heard  the  Gospel  and  believed  for  himself  on 
the  Lord  Jesus  Christ.  All  members  have  equal  voting  rights  in  church  matters, 
except  that  in  some  churches  they  are  restricted  to  those  over  a  certain  age.  The 
officers  are  the  pastor  and  deacons,  who,  with  such  other  persons  as  the  church 
may  elect,  constitute  a  church  committee,  usually  called  the  standing  committee, 
and  have  general  care  of  the  affairs  of  the  church,  but  no  authority,  except  as  it 
is  specifically  delegated  to  them  by  the  church.  Church  property  is  held  some- 
times by  a  board  of  trustees,  sometimes  by  the  entire  society,  and  sometimes  by 
a  special  committee  of  the  church. 

For  missionary  and  educational  or  other  purposes,  Baptist  churches  usually 
group  themselves  into  associations  and  State  conventions.  The  oldest  is  the 
Philadelphia  Association,  organized  in  1707,  which  stood  alone  until  1751,  when 
the  Charleston  Association  was  formed  in  South  Carolina.  These  associations 
and  conventions  meet  annually  and  are  composed  of  messengers  sent  by  the 
churches.  They  elect  their  own  officers,  receive  reports  from  the  churches,  and 
make  recommendations  with  regard  to  work  or  other  matters  in  which  the  churches 
are  interested.  They  have,  however,  no  authority  to  legislate  for  the  churches, 
and  no  power  to  enforce  any  action  they  may  take.  Many  of  them  conduct 
missionary  or  educational  work  in  the  fields  covered  by  them. 

Applicants  for  the  ministry  are  licensed  to  preach  by  the  church  in  which 
they  hold  membership.  If,  after  a  period  of  service  as  licentiate,  ordination  is 
desired,  a  council  of  sister  churches  is  called  by  the  church  in  which  membership 
is  held,  and  on  the  recommendation  of  this  council,  the  church  arranges  for  ordi- 
nation. In  both  cases  the  right  to  license  and  the  right  to  ordain  are  held  by  th<j 
individual  church.  Previous  to  ordination  there  is  always  an  examination  of  the 
candidate  on  matters  of  religious  experience,  call  to  the  ministry,  and  views  on 
scriptural  doctrine.  During  his  ministry,  a  pastor  is  usually  a  member  of  the 
church  which  he  serves,  and  is  amenable  to  its  discipline.  When  a  question  of 
dismissal  from  the  ministry  arises,  the  individual  church  calls  a  council  of  sister 
churches  for  the  examination  of  charges,  and  on  the  recommendation  of  this 
council,  the  church  usually  bases  its  decision. 


90  CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

Besides  local  associations  and  State  conventions,  the  Baptists  have  general,  or 
national  conventions,  with  home  mission  societies,  foreign  mission  societies, 
educational  societies,  etc.  These  larger  bodies  attend  to  missionary  or  educational 
work  in  the  various  States  or  districts,  and  are  supported  by  the  churches.  Like 
the  local  associations,  none  of  these  larger  organizations  has  any  authority  over  the 
individual  churches. 

WORK 

The  organized  activities  of  the  Baptist  churches  are,  for  the  most  part,  con- 
ducted by  societies  whose  membership  includes  individuals  and  delegates  from 
churches  or  associations,  membership  in  most  cases  being  based  on  contributions. 
Until  the  separation  of  the  northern  and  southern  churches,  the  home  missionary 
work  was  carried  on  chiefly  by  The  American  Baptist  Publication  Society,  or- 
ganized in  1824,  and  The  American  Baptist  Home  Mission  Society,  organized 
in  1832;  and  the  foreign  missionary  work,  by  the  General  Missionary  Convention 
of  the  Baptist  Denomination  in  the  United  States  of  America  for  Foreign  Missions, 
organized  in  Philadelphia  in  1814.  Since  the  organization  of  the  Southern  Bap- 
tist Convention  the  publication  society  has  continued  its  work  throughout  the 
different  States,  and  has  retained  its  distinctly  national  character.  The  American 
Baptist  Home  Mission  Society,  however,  subsequently  represented  the  northern 
churches  only,  as  did  also  the  foreign  missionary  society,  which  in  1846  changed 
its  name  to  the  American  Baptist  Missionary  Union,  and  again  in  1910,  to  the 
American  Baptist  Foreign  Missionary  Society. 

A  general  movement,  manifest  throughout  the  country,  in  church  life  as  well 
as  in  business  and  public  matters,  is  that  for  centralization  of  administration,  in 
the  interest  of  both  economy  and  efficiency.  The  Baptist  churches  felt  this,  as 
did  every  other  denomination,  and  began  to  consider  whether  their  benevolent 
societies,  hitherto  in  some  respects  distinct  from  each  other,  might  not  be  brought 
into  some  form  of  general  organization  which,  by  removing  possibilities  of  fric- 
tion and  securing  cooperation,  would  make  for  greater  efficiency.  After  con- 
siderable discussion  a  move  in  this  direction  was  made  in  1907,  which  has  been 
carried  out  quite  successfully  and,  it  is  expected,  will  work  great  good  both  to 
the  activities  of  the  churches  and  their  general  denominational  life. 

Educational  work  among  the  Baptists  in  the  United  States  has  made  great 
strides  in  recent  years,  but  the  same  general  independence  of  ecclesiastical  con- 
trol is  manifest  in  this  department  as  in  the  government  of  the  local  churches, 
and  is  illustrated  in  the  University  of  Chicago.  The  same  is  true  of  the  manage- 
ment of  Baptist  philanthropic  institutions.  ,In  most  cases,  however,  the  mem- 
bership of  the  boards  is  limited  to  persons  connected  with  Baptist  churches. 

In  addition  to  the  work  done  by  the  denominational  societies,  a  large  amount 
of  missionary  and  educational  work  is  carried  on  by  individual  churches,  which  is 
not  included  in  any  denominational  statement. 


NORTHERN  BAPTIST  CONVENTION 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with,  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  for  the  year  1936 
is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have 
been  received  into  the  local  church  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by 
immersion. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY  OF   STATISTICS   FOR   CHURCHES  IN  URBAN   AND  RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number  

6,284 

1,329,044 
211 

493,998 
740,  293 
94,  753 
66.7 

60,  691 
1,  114,  460 
153,  893 
5.2 

6,085 
5,922 
$167,  576,  463 
$164,911,178 

$2,  665,  285 
$28,  297 
1,694 
$20,063,272 
3,067 

3,149 
3,004 
$11,930,664 

6,168 
$19,  577,  463 
$6,400,783 
$2,  266,  558 
$1,  478,  671 

$1,364,921 
$4,347,318 

$436,207 
$281,  492 
$321,  153 

$2,026,258 
$654,  102 
$3,174 

5,904 
112,  565 
892,  872 

2,625 

964,  322 
367 

352,  404 
533,  934 
77,  984 
66.0 

47,  891 
798,  635 
117,  796 
5  7 

2,561 
2,492 
$142,430,489 
$140,  291,  030 

$2,  139,  459 
$57,  155 
1,239 
$19,  041,  188 
901 

1,391 
1,311 
$7,  384,  625 

2,613 
$15,  656,  768 
$4,483,215 
$2,046,867 
$1,  088,  599 

$1,  196,  974 
$3,712,690 

$368,  398 
$232,  991 
$267,  091 

$1,  698,  919 
$561,  024 
$5,992 

2,572 
69,845 
620,  483 

3,659 

364,  722 
100 

141,  594 
206,359 
16,  769 
68.6 

12,  800 
315,825 
36,  097 
3.9 

3,524 
3,430 
$25,  145,  974 
$24,  620,  148 

$525,826 
$7,  331 
455 
$1,022,084 
2,166 

1,758 
1,693 
$4,  546,  039 

3,555 
$3,920,695 
$1,917,568 
$219,  691 
$390,072 

$167,  947 
$634,628 

$67,809 
$48,  501 
$54,062 

$327,339 
$93,  078 
$1,  103 

3,332 
42,720 
272,  389 

41.8 
72.6 

58.2 
27.4 

Members,  number  .                   . 

Average  Tnefnl^rship  per  c1hnr<^h 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

71.3 
72.1 
82.3 

28.7 
27.9 
17.7 

Female      

Sex  not  reported  _      

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years    —            

78.9 
71.7 
76.5 

21.1 
28.3 
23.5 

13  years  and  over    _             -  

Age  not  reported                      

Percent  under  13  years  * 

Church  edifices,  number 

42.1 
42.1 
85.0 
85.1 

80  3 

57.9 
57.9 
15.0 
14.9 

19.7 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported     "" 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part, 
in  1936       

Average  value  per  church 

Debt  —  number  reporting  

73.1 
94.9 
29.4 

44.2 
43.6 
61.9 

42.4 
80.0 
70.0 
90.3 
73.6 

87.7 
85.4 

84.5 
82.8 
83.2 

83.8 
85.8 

26.9 
5.1 
70.6 

55.8 
56.4 
38.1 

57.6 
20.0 
30.0 
9.7 
26.4 

12.3 
14.6 

15.5 
17.2 
16.8 

16.2 
14.2 

Amount  reported                  

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Parsonages  number                              - 

Value~~number  reporting 

Amount  reported-         

Expenditures  ; 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Amount  reported                         

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding 

All  other  current  expenses,  including 
interest                         

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross, 
etc 

TTo"m$  Tni<5<?irms                                    _  _  _ 

Foreign  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribu- 
tion                                

All  other  purposes-      _     

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number             -  -  -  - 

43.6 
62.0 
69.5 

56.4 
38.0 
30.5 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars  

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


91 


92 


CENSUS1   OF   KELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE    1* — SUMMARY  OF   STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN   AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL 

Urban 

Rural 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number    .,    --  

1,653 
16,  623 
129,  349 

311 
1,751 
19,  659 

42 
736 
4,805 

829 
10,  025 
82,  852 

210 
1,291 
14,747 

24 
574 
4,072 

824 
6,598 
46,497 

101 
460 
4,912 

18 
162 
733 

50.2 
60.3 
64.1 

67.5 
73.7 
75.0 

0) 

78.0 
84.7 

49.8 
39.7 
35.9 

32.5 
26.3 
25.0 

00 
22.0 
15.3 

Officers  and  teachers          _.      _  

Scholars        --              -            -  

Weekday  religious  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  teachers    -    --  

Scholars                              -.    -    

Parochial  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  teachers        

Scholars         -            --  

2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention 
for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906.  Statistics  for  1916  and  1906 
include  those  of  the  Free  Baptist  churches,  that  body  having  united  with  the 
Northern  Baptist  Convention  since  1916.  The  Colored  Baptist  churches  in 
Northern  States,  because  of  their  membership  in  colored  associations,  are  included 
under  the  Negro  Baptists  at  the  censuses  of  1936  and  1926. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916i 

1906i 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number  ._ 

6,284 

7,611 

8,319 

9,585 

Increase  2  over  preceding  census: 

TsTirrnhei*      u              ,         ,               -,      .  ._    .    _ 

—  1,  327 

-708 

—  1,  266 

Percent 

—17.4 

-8.5 

—13.2 

Members,  number      _._.__ 

1,329,044 

1  289,966 

1,  244,  705 

1  133  464 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
Number      -                            -  -  

39,  078 

45,  261 

111,  241 

Percent 

3.0 

3.6 

9  8 

Average  membership  per  church 

211 

169 

150 

118 

Church.  edifices,  number 

6  085 

7  722 

8  264 

9  355 

Value—  number  reporting 

5,922 

7  297 

7  907 

8  887 

Amount  reported  -  

$167,  576,  463 

$185,  370,  576 

$95,  314,  853 

$77  594  155 

Average  value  per  church  

$28,  297 

$25,  404 

$12,  054 

$8  731 

Debt  —  number  reporting  

1,694 

1,603 

1,797 

1  679 

Amount  reported 

$20,  063,  272 

$16  004  041 

$7,  322,  615 

$5  287  911 

Parsonages,  number  _  

3,149 

Vatoft  —  number  reporting. 

3,004 

3  716 

3  233 

2  899 

Amount  reported 

$11,  930  664 

$18  279  770 

$8  432  072 

$5  989  838 

Expenditures  : 
Ohiirohes  report]  ng,  num  ber  ..   

6,168 

7,380 

8,001 

Amount  reported  

$19,  577,  463 

$34,  318,  486 

$16,205  825 

Pastors'  salaries 

$6  400  783 

All  other  salaries 

$2  266  558 

Eepairs  and  improvements  

$1,  478,  671 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding 

$27,  647,  658 

$12,  972,  200 

interest  

$1,  364,  921 

All  other  current  expenses,  including 
interest    ._  

$4,  347,  318 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Bed  Cross,  etc_. 
Home  missions  

$436,  207 
$281,  492 

[Foreign  missions,  . 

$321,  153 

$6,656  755 

$3  194  411 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution. 
All  other  purposes  

$2,026,258 
$654,  102 

Not  classified 

$14  073 

$39  214 

Average  expenditure  per  church  

$3,  174 

$4,  650 

$2'  025 

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  number  _  

5,904 

6  999 

7,658 

8  405 

Officers  and  teachers  

112,  565 

114,  237 

114  433 

111  676 

Scholars  

892,  872 

1,052  794 

1  040  594 

916*  370 

1  Statistics  for  1916  and  1906  include  those  of  the  Free  Baptists,  a  body  which  has  united  since  1916  with  this 
denomination;  they  also  include  colored  churches  in  the  Northern  States,  tabulated  in  1926  and  1936  under 
Negro  Baptists.  2  A.  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


NORTHERN   BAPTIST  CONVENTION 


93 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Northern  Bap- 
tist Convention  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number 
and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or 
rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table 
4  gives  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years 
1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years 
of  age"  and  '  13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  churches  and 
parsonages  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices  for  1936.  Table  6  presents, 
for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improve- 
ments, benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics  of 
any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables  5  and  6  is  limited  to  those 
States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value  and  expenditures. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  in  the  Northern 
Baptist  Convention,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States 
in  the  preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and  debt 
on  church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBEE  AND  MEMBEESHIP  OF  CHTTECHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RUEAL 
TEEEITOEY,  MEMBEESHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

NUMB 

ER  OF  CHUI 

ICHES 

NUMB! 

3R  OF  MEMI 

JERS 

Total 

Urban 

Rural 

Total 

Urban 

Rural 

United  States  

6  284 

2  625 

3  659 

1  329  044 

984  822 

364  722 

NEW  ENGLAND: 

Maine  

278 

35 

243 

30,  637 

12  035 

18  602 

New  Hampshire  

116 

19 

97 

12  220 

6  248 

5  972 

Vermont 

73 

11 

62 

9  997 

4  089 

5  908 

Massachusetts 

272 

186 

86 

90  366 

79  932 

10  434 

Rhode  Island  

89 

43 

46 

18^  749 

14  132 

4,617 

Connecticut  -  - 

126 

73 

53 

26  521 

21  294 

5  227 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

694 

299 

395 

181  918 

142  251 

39  667 

New  Jersey 

223 

144 

79 

55  986 

45  493 

10  493 

Pennsylvania  

578 

314 

264 

143,  432 

115,  302 

28,  130 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio             

385 

180 

205 

87,  260 

67,  051 

20,  209 

Indiana 

408 

110 

298 

80,  498 

43,029 

37,  469 

Illinois  

397 

213 

184 

97,  373 

74,  408 

22,965 

Michigan       _  ~  

265 

128 

137 

49,  275 

38,  217 

11,  058 

"Wisconsin       .    

143 

60 

83 

19,  627 

12,  829 

6,798 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

190 

74 

116 

32,  039 

22,  856 

9,183 

Iowa 

204 

73 

131 

36,  900 

24,  124 

12,  776 

Missouri    

2t 

2 

561 

561 

North  Dakota  _-  .  _  _  >  

63 

7 

56 

6,198 

1,536 

4,662 

South  Dakota 

65 

14 

51 

8,521 

3,621 

4,900 

Nebraska 

111 

37 

74 

19,  119 

10,  926 

8,193 

Kansas  

260 

84 

176 

55,906 

36,  695 

19,  211 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware     -  

14 

13 

1 

5,178 

5,088 

90 

Maryland           -- 

7 

1 

6 

829 

414 

415 

District  of  f  olnfHbfa 

24 

24 

17,  823 

17,823 

"West  Virginia 

565 

59 

506 

77,  848 

28,  742 

49,  106 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
ICentucky 

3 

3 

185 

185 

Alabama 

1 

1 

80 

80 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Oklahoma 

9 

1 

8 

1,657 

70 

1,587 

Texas 

1 

1 

17 

17 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana    

38 

17 

21 

5,336 

3,983 

1,353 

Idaho                    -                  -  

46 

14 

32 

6,612 

3,728 

2,884 

"Wyoming 

25 

6 

19 

4,017 

2,193 

1,824 

Colorado 

99 

43 

56 

20,  496 

15,538 

4,958 

Arizona       

37 

21 

16 

6,451 

5,124 

1,327 

Utah           

8 

7 

1 

1,376 

1,329 

47 

Nevada                                  

7 

4 

3 

1,193 

995 

198 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

113 

64 

49 

19,  726 

15,  551 

4,175 

Oregon 

79 

40 

39 

16,  546 

13,  219 

3,327 

California      -  

266 

205 

61 

80,  571 

73,896 

6,675 

94 


CENSUS'   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  3. — KUMBBE  AND  MBMBBKSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES, 
1936 — Continued 


MEMBERS! 

SIP  BY  SEX 

SU1 

TDAY  SCHO( 

3L8 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

Male 

Female 

Sex  not 
reported 

Males 
per  100 
females 

Churches 
report- 
ing 

Officers 
and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States,          

493,  998 

740,  293 

94,  753 

88  7 

5,904 

113,  565 

892,  872 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine      -            -  -- 

10,  366 

19,  282 

989 

53  8 

242 

3,285 

22,  633 

New  Hampshire 

4,189 

7,859 

172 

53.3 

97 

1,270 

8  651 

Vermont                  -  - 

3,912 

5,502 

583 

71.1 

65 

810 

4,792 

Massachusetts      -    -  -- 

33,  036 

51,  019 

6,311 

64.8 

264 

6,822 

67,  335 

Rhode  Island 

6,479 

10,  384 

1,886 

62  4 

82 

1,640 

11  654 

Connecticut              - 

10,  361 

15,  487 

673 

66  9 

121 

2,106 

13  855 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC- 
New  York           

66,  472 

102,  345 

13,  101 

64  9 

652 

12,  622 

89  314 

New  Jersey      ~  

20,  231 

31,  578 

4,177 

64.1 

213 

5,246 

38  702 

Pennsylvania        -  .. 

49,  366 

71,  989 

22,  077 

68.6 

553 

12,  309 

97,  388 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

34,  829 

50  320 

2  111 

69  2 

364 

7,373 

63  679 

Indiana      

30,  280 

42,  228 

7,990 

71.7 

390 

6,650 

54,  684 

Illinois 

36  168 

53  476 

7  729 

67  6 

390 

8  094 

69  746 

Michigan.  

18,  501 

28,904 

1,870 

64.0 

255 

5,154 

45',  099 

Wisconsin      

7,560 

11,  284 

783 

67.0 

135 

2,074 

13,  570 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL- 
Minnesota                -  --  - 

11,  490 

16  712 

3,837 

68.8 

171 

3  172 

22  636 

Iowa 

14  257 

20  838 

1  805 

68  4 

190 

3  337 

23  404 

Missouri    .-       --  --  

318 

243 

130  9 

2 

52 

568 

North  Dakota           

2  407 

3,452 

339 

69.7 

53 

749 

6  116 

South  Dakota       -  -- 

3,519 

4,916 

86 

71  6 

62 

876 

7  059 

Nebraska                     ..  - 

7  409 

11,  248 

462 

65.9 

106 

1  899 

12  477 

Kansas        -         ._  -. 

21,751 

31,  356 

2,799 

69.4 

253 

4  788 

36  742 

SOUTH    ATLANTIC: 

Delaware    

1,652 

3,429 

97 

48.2 

14 

448 

2  854 

Maryland 

270 

437 

122 

61  8 

g 

122 

1  111 

District  of  Coliunbfa  ,  .  ,  .  , 

6,258 

8,055 

3,510 

77.7 

24 

1,240 

14*  72S 

West  Virginia  

31,  449 

45,  492 

907 

69.1 

505 

6  439 

54  219 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

83 

102 

81  4 

3 

22 

109 

Alabama          .  -„ 

45 

35 

(i) 

1 

14 

66 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Oklahoma     ._.  -  _ 

676 

981 

68  9 

9 

102 

738 

Texas  

5 

12 

(i) 

1 

g 

41 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana 

2  167 

3  169 

68  4 

32 

479 

3  637 

Idaho 

2  462 

4  150 

59  3 

42 

656 

6  275 

Wyoming 

1  617 

2  400 

67  4 

23 

451 

2  983 

Colorado 

7  866 

11  895 

735 

66  1 

90 

1  781 

14  263 

Arizona 

2  630 

3  821 

68  8 

35 

501 

4  589 

Utah 

509 

867 

58  7 

8 

120 

'947 

Nevada 

446 

644 

103 

69  3 

7 

89 

1  046 

PACIFIC: 
Washington    -  

7,685 

11,  826 

315 

64  1 

108 

1  908 

15  860 

Oregon     -~  

6,234 

9,758 

554 

63  9 

75 

1*521 

11  127 

California     ..    _ 

29,  143 

42  798 

8  630 

68  1 

261 

6  336 

59  181 

i  Eatio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


NORTHERN   BAPTIST  CONVENTION 


95 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OP  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC 
DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1926 

19161 

1906^ 

1936 

1936 

19161 

19001 

Under  13 
years 

CO  Jg 

3 

*! 

ft 

o,  I  Percent 
*K>  1  under  13* 

United  States... 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine  

6,284 

7,611 

8,319 

9,585 

1,329,044 

1,289,966 

1,244,705 

1,133,464 

60,691 

1414,460 

153,893 

278 
116 
73 
272 
89 
126 

694 
223 

578 

385 
408 
397 
265 
143 

190 
204 
2 

347 
129 
87 
321 
100 
130 

857 
266 
690 

476 
468 
460 
355 
170 

211 

297 

455 
181 
119 
357 
105 
152 

942 

270 
753 

473 
494 
472 
400 
208 

239 
357 

436 
170 
126 
352 
102 
143 

1,028 
287 
780 

553 

520 
1,062 
512 
242 

268 
412 
121 
72 
91 
229 
457 

16 
14 
20 
7 
619 
14 

30,637 
12,220 
9,997 
90,366 
18,749 
26,  521 

181,918 
55,986 
143,432 

87,260 
80,498 
97,373 
49,275 
19,  627 

32,039 
36,900 
561 
6,198 
8,521 
19,119 
55,906 

5,178 
829 
17,823 

32,031 
13,820 
9,626 
89,635 
18,830 
22,873 

161,  142 
62,  539 
124,  949 

89,328 
82,394 
95,589 
56,878 
20,  096 

30,897 
45,775 

35,  492 
17,  335 
10,010 
88,016 
19,285 
26,  243 

183,330 
62,  769 
154,  105 

78,258 
75,374 
85,  649 
49,835 
20,425 

28,145 
44,939 

32,  511 
15,  931 
9,951 
75,  611 
17,556 
25,  616 

171,857 
54,  404 
120,  628 

70,  188 
62,  134 
126,  639 
49,  350 
20,  701 

24,  102 
40,  956 
5,640 
4,596 
6,193 
17,  386 
35,801 

2,694 
1,494 
10,  777 
425 
50,  149 
776 

2,165 
1,840 
1,200 
2,804 

337 
1,382 

751 
258 
293 
2,651 
305 
1,008 

6,775 
1,874 
6,785 

4,828 
4,584 
4,148 
3,529 
620 

1,101 

1,827 

27,944 
9,869 
8,569 
79,  050 
16,  554 
24,  498 

158,  752 
45,  488 
105,  386 

76,331 
66,336 
82,  641 
43,462 
17,330 

25,  687 
32,095 
37 
5,727 
7,374 
17,365 
48,055 

4,596 
659 
12,959 

1,942 
2,093 
1,135 
8,665 
1,890 
1,015 

16,  391 
8,624 
31,  261 

6,101 
9,578 
10,  584 
2,284 
1,677 

5,251 
2,978 
524 
330 
831 
1,022 
3,460 

270 
122 
4,295 

2.6 
2.5 
3.3 
3.2 
1.8 
4.0 

4.1 
4.0 
6  0 

5.9 
6.5 
4.S 
7.5 
3.5 

4.1 
5.4 

~2.~4 
4.1 
4.0 
8.4 

6.4 
6.8 

4.2 

New  Hampshire.. 
Vermont  

Massachusetts  _-- 
Rhode  Island  
Connecticut  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York. 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania  

E.  N.  OENTEAL: 
Ohio  ..  . 

Indiana 

Illinois.    . 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

W.  N.  CENTRAL: 

Minnesota  

Iowa   .  _ 

Missouri 

North  Dakota.... 
South  Dakota  
Nebraska 

63 
65 
111 
260 

14 
7 
24 

79 
93 
130 
359 

10 
5 
23 

90 
102 
188 
400 

15 
6 
17 
5 
637 

7,289 
9,284 
19,  145 
54,740 

2,164 
422 
11,930 

6,268 
8,852 
19,643 
46,966 

3,651 
610 
9,667 
268 
62,  547 

141 
316 
732 
4,391 

312 

48 
569 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

Maryland.  . 

Dist.  of  Columbia. 
Virginia 

West  Virginia.  
Georgia 

565 

696 

77,848 

76,934 

3,346 

66,864 

7,638 

4.8 

E.  S.  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  

3 



1 

39 
30 

185 

22 

2 

169 

14 

1.2 

Alabama 

1 

21 
47 

80 

80 

W.  S.  CENTRAL: 

8 

Louisiana 

31 

Oklahoma  
Texas 

9 
1 

11 

4 
19 

44 
61 
35 
109 

~""l9 

26 
45 
19 
87 
57 

1,657 
17 

5,336 
6,612 
4,017 
20,496 

1,683 

75 
1,271 

4,073 
5,682 
1,841 
16,528 

73 

1,584 
17 

4,274 
5,983 
2,734 
18,185 

4.4 

630 

2,029 
2,331 
838 
12,917 
2,331 
1,034 
987 
316 

12,440 
11,099 

22,718 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana.  ..  

38 
46 
25 
99 

54 
58 
36 
122 

4,481 
6,573 
3,459 
24,166 

289 
415 
301 
1,270 

773 
214 
982 
1,041 

6.3 
6.5 
9.9 
6,5 

Idaho.    

Wyoming  

Colorado  .  ._  

Arizona.  _.  

37 
8 
7 

113 

79 
266 

38 
11 
8 

145 
105 
264 

44 
14 

7 

173 
127 
244 

15 
10 
4 

154 
128 
192 

6,451 
1,376 
1,193 

19,  726 
16,546 
80,571 

5,922 
1,121 
674 

21,499 
18,945 
63,  133 

2,927 
1,305 
356 

17,738 
15,635 
39,570 

378 

128 
76 

987 
872 
4,708 

5,418 
1,248 
1,014 

17,357 
13,  593 
59,  176 

655 

6.5 
9.3 
7.0 

5.4 
6.0 
7.4 

Utah 

Nevada  

103 

1,382 
2,081 
16,  687 

PACIFIC: 
Washington  
Oregon.     

California  

i  Includes  figures  for  the  Free  Baptist  Church. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


96 


CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT   OF  CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF 
PARSONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

| 

Churches 
reporting 

I 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  _  — 

6,284 

6,085 

5,922 

$187,  576,  483 

1,694 

$20,  063,  272 

3,004 

$11,  930,  664 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine 

278 
116 

73 
272 
89 
126 

694 
223 
578 

385 
408 
397 
265 
143 

190 
204 
63 
65 
111 
260 

14 

7 
24 
565 

3 
9 

38 
46 
25 
99 
37 
8 
7 

113 
79 
266 

4 

273 

114 
71 
266 
84 
122 

678 
217 
562 

374 
396 
389 
261 
141 

189 
200 
58 
64 
110 
250 

13 

7 
24 
509 

3 

9 

37 

44 
25 
92 
34 
8 
7 

111 
76 
264 

3 

268 
109 
67 
258 
79 
118 

672 
216 
542 

355 
383 
375 
257 
139 

186 
198 
58 
63 
105 
248 

13 
4 
23 

496 

3 

9 

35 
43 
25 
90 
32 
8 
6 

109 
74 
253 

23 

3,  298,  757 
1,  425,  500 
1,  104,  525 
13,  971,  754 
2,  753,  185 
5,  154,  399 

36,  474,  680 
11,  188,  428 
19,  134,  854 

9,  937,  390 
5,  724,  201 
11,  220,  208 
6,  280,  560 
2,  350,  707 

3.  754,  169 
3,  082,  625 
412,  550 
878,  750 
1,  729,  730 
3,  626,  305 

699,  500 
69,  000 
2.  877,  500 
3,  871,  600 

2,800 
63,  050 

529,  421 
329,  100 
284,  200 
2,182,  525 
529,  475 
350,  000 
86,  450 

2,  073,  524 
1,  326,  354 
8,  669,  687 

129,  000 

41 
7 
10 
85 
21 
35 

190 
100 
216 

91 
74 
114 
96 
59 

50 
44 
10 
17 
30 
70 

7 
2 
16 
43 

162,  065 
13,  598 
45,  836 
850,  637 
175,  082 
416,  151 

6,  473,  630 
1,  215,  671 
2,  323,  684 

1,  087,  511 
530,  753 
1,  657,  454 
817,  111 
264,  105 

338,  267 
225,  461 
33,  890 
53,  925 
130,  464 
415,  709 

35,  855 
28,  865 
413,  209 
206,  088 

155 
83 
54 
125 
38 
77 

437 
156 

277 

135 
102 
182 
154 
88 

94 
127 
34 
41 
73 
132 

7 
1 
5 
80 

471,  850 
265,  050 
202,  000 
683,  750 
210,  200 
439,  712 

1,  948,  796 
974,  310 
1,  333,  014 

522,  050 
302,  000 
776,  610 
547,  416 
356,  300 

308,  400 
434,  550 
99,  050 
134,  550 
193,  200 
332,  440 

43,  500 

53,  000 
341,  983 

New  Hampshire            -  _    

Vermont.     _          _      

Massachusetts  _.. 

Rhode  Island 

Connecticut  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

New  Jersey  

Pennsylvania,  ...... 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio   _            -____. 

Indiana  _.    __ 

Illinois 

Michigan 

"Wisconsin  - 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota  ~- 

lowa  

North  Dakota  - 

South  Dakota 

Nebraska  __ 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Delaware  

Maryland 

District  of  Columbia 

West  Virginia  , 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL- 

Olrlq.Ti(mia 

2 

9 
11 
11 
30 
10 
4 
2 

43 
20 
123 

1 

7,600 

27,  050 
13,  000 
27,  052 
82,  643 
185,  414 
16,  515 
1,700 

263,  578 
95,  122 
1,  393,  577 

35,  000 

5 

18 
31 
10 
45 
18 
2 
5 

58 
35 
118 

2 

11,  200 

54,350 
64,  900 
25,  300 
121,  175 
39,  300 
0) 
16,  000 

144,  783 
92,  200 
369,  125 

18,  600 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana 

Idaho    ._    __    __ 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

Arizona- 

Utah..-  _  

Nevada  

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

Oregon  - 

California  

Other  States 

1  Amount  included  in  figures  for  "Other  States,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual 
church. 
*  Includes:  Missouri,  1;  Alabama,  1;  and  Texas,  1. 


NORTHERN   BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


97 


TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  Is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 


Total 
number 

of 
churches 


EXPENDITURES 


Churches 
report- 
ing 


Total 
amount 


Pastors' 
salaries 


All  other 
salaries 


Repairs 
and  im- 
prove- 
ments 


United  States 8,284 

NEW  ENGLAND: 

Maine _  278 

New  Hampshire 116 

Vermont.- 73 

Massachusetts _ 272 

Rhode  Island 89 

Connecticut 126 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC. 

New  York 694 

New  Jersey. 223 

Pennsylvania  __ ___  578 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

Ohio 385 

Indiana.  _ 408 

Illinois 397 

Michigan 265 

Wisconsin 143 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

Minnesota 190 

Iowa _ 204 

North  Dakota 63 

South  Dakota 65 

Nebraska 111 

Kansas 260 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Delaware 14 

Maryland _  7 

District  of  Columbia 24 

West  Virginia 565 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL- 

Kentucky 3 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Oklahoma 9 

MOUNTAIN: 

Montana 38 

Idaho-- 46 

Wyoming 25 

Colorado 99 

Arizona 37 

Utah 8 

Nevada.. _ 7 

PACIFIC- 

Washington.... 113 

Oregon „ 79 

California.  _ 266 

Other  States 4 


,168 


260 
107 

72 
272 

87 
126 


684 
223 


379 
404 
394 
263 
142 


186 
196 
60 
65 
109 
257 


13 

7 

24 
546 


113 
78 
265 

14 


$19,  577, 463 


452,  741 
212, 479 
135,  350 
1, 646,  584 
376,  450 
571, 890 


3,  038, 809 
1, 136,  515 
2, 023,  780 


1, 259,  910 
680, 009 

1, 449,  531 
809,457 
331, 098 


556,  208 
384, 485 
82, 879 
108,  010 
214,  762 
546, 203 


51,  581 
13,  624 
343,  704 
509,  405 


753 


10, 142 


80,  786 

86,  340 

45, 070 

245,295 

115,  747 

20,545 

18,  777 


283, 051 

225,  049 

1,  500, 356 

10, 088 


$6, 400,  783 


196,  635 

99,  449 

63,  266 

478,  467 

123, 145 

164,  820 


904, 881 
364,  863 
652, 127 


378,  903 
271, 351 
459, 202 
275, 152 
136, 163 


177, 976 
159,  686 
34,  743 
47,  251 
90,  631 
190,  668 


16,  716 

6,134 

59, 468 

202, 101 


403 


5,301 


35, 981 
35,922 
21, 220 


33,  719 

8,478 
10,589 


113,409 

91, 227 

401, 037 

3,473 


$2,  266,  558 


27,  273 
18,  274 
11, 109 
230,  593 
50,  212 


511,  327 
145, 835 
226, 372 


132, 400 
61, 486 

169,  798 
90, 226 
24, 460 


59,  525 
29,  630 
3,620 
5,682 
17,  666 
44, 649 


722 

48,  591 
40, 456 


56 


227 


5,840 

5,186 

1,944 

20,  329 

5,810 

1,820 

950 


19, 363 
16, 305 
165, 287 

785 


81,478,671 


52,  798 

17, 923 

9,207 

113,  932 

37,  699 

50,  900 


179,  757 
80,215 
179,  587 


89,  730 
69,  387 
120,  601 
62, 271 
33,  530 


38, 457 
35,448 
3,440 
4,796 
16,139 
38,  375 


2,142 

469 

18,  309 

50,  268 


198 
601 


12, 016 
5,058 
3,277 

11, 847 
6,664 
1,499 
1,110 


36, 116 
23, 019 
71,  692 

194 


1  Includes:  Missouri,  2;  Alabama,  1;  and  Texas,  1. 


98 


CENSUS    OF    EE'LIGIOTJS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  6. — CHUBCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 — Continued 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

EXPENDITURES—  continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt, 
excluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local 
relief  and 
charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  general 
head- 
quarters 

All  other 
purposes 

United  States..  _  

81,  364,  921 

S4,  347,  318 

$436,  207 

$281,  492 

2,497 
1,004 
35 
22,  116 
1,032 
2,745 

48,  241 
19,  859 
21,  429 

19,  249 
6,283 
26,800 
19,  270 
4,177 

10,  929 
2,148 
2,018 
1,141 
1,264 
9,175 

702 
41 
6,413 
3,686 

$321,  153 

$2,026,258 

$854,  102 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Maine 

15.292 
2,343 
3,167 
71,  691 
6,258 
47,  116 

159,  145 
71,  574 
158,277 

149,  163 
44,782 
102,  672 
75,  167 
18,  200 

33,  424 
23,  540 
15,  054 
15,  909 
10,  247 
41,  480 

10,  115 
530 
43,  658 
51,  846 

93,  353 

41,410 
24,  524 
441,  314 
93,  362 
128,  537 

700,  225 
245,  551 
445,  807 

302,  538 
132,  004 
338,  164 
159,  419 
65,  136 

138,  953 
74,008 
12,  355 
16,  256 
43,  767 
111,  020 

10,  005 
3,687 
70,441 
82,  748 

28 
1,328 

13,  394 
15,  727 
7,429 
49,  531 
39,866 
4,571 
2,730 

56,539 
42,  130 
336,  880 

2,581 

9,025 
4,339 
1,747 
44,147 
10,  215 
10,  523 

81,  910 
24,  746 
48,  952 

18,  938 
11,  248 
35,  757 
17,  816 
5,138 

13,  479 
6,008 
2,489 
1,148 
2,879 
9,110 

588 
131 
20,  064 
8,761 

6,148 
1,570 
332 
33,  620 
1,418 
3,509 

68,  385 
27,889 
28,  024 

16,  211 
9,698 
26,  570 
26,  625 
3,329 

10,  907 
6,375 
1,235 
921 
1,932 
3,762 

538 
20 
3,623 
2,935 

39,  335 

22,  794 
17,  131 
161,002 
48,246 
83,  982 

267,427 
124,  397 
199,414 

125,  250 
55,941 
135,  481 
63,  713 
30,930 

56,400 
36,  782 
6,218 
12,  003 
22,  502 
71,  695 

3,886 
822 
45,  539 
51,  226 

3 

8 

6,418 
11,  549 
2,712 
33,  021 
13,082 
1,334 
1,579 

26,  559 
27,  253 
220,  547 

77 

10,  385 
3,373 
4,832 
49,  702 
4,863 
13,  076 

117,  511 
31,  586 
63,  791 

27,  528 
17,  829 
34,  486 
19,  798 
10,  035 

16,  158 
10,  860 
1,707 
2,903 
7,735 
26,  269 

821 
1,068 
27,  598 

15,  378 

65 

517 

721 
1,225 
1,549 
8,175 
3,517 
720 
278 

5,895 
6,692 
104,  990 

466 

New  Hampshire.,    _„ 

Vermont    __     „  

Massachusetts  .. 

Rhode  Island  

Connecticut 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

Indiana.      

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa 

North  Dakota 

South  Dakota  

Nebraska  _  _ 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware             .. 

Maryland  

District  of  Columbia  
West  Virginia 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Oklahoma  _»    . 

1,000 

3,754 
9,685 
4,992 
21,  835 
8,373 
1,115 
800 

14,  008 
8,941 
118,  768 

1,000 

246 

1,183 
1,500 
550 
4,656 
2,999 
154 
741 

5,799 
4,123 
25,083 

15 

455 

838 
132 
635 
3,922 
1,543 
359 

459 

641 
356 
762 
5,753 

174 
495 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana   -          -.    --- 

Idaho  

Wyoming  .. 

Colorado" 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada  ... 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

2,114 
3,162 
35,  300 

778 

3,249 
2,197 
20,772 

719 

Oregon  .       . 

California 

Other  States 

NORTHERN    BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


99 


TABLE  1. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,    VALUE  AND  DEBT    ON: 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS,  1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

1 

"3  2 
fe^ 

JD 
£ 

VALUE  OP 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHUECH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

I 

CQ 

Total.  

6,284 

1,  329,  044 
80 
6,451 

2,105 
832 
1,186 
280 
839 
2,104 

„     1,  413 
6,412 
6.092 
2,638 
847 
516 

6,469 
5,158 
621 
1,800 
21,  591 

3,311 

2,467 
5,673 
7.777 
440 

477 
16 
437 
709 
1,776 
116 

8,171 
701 
7/58 
5,386 
619 
1,320 

1,545 
4,310 
6,892 
7,621 
3,854 
2,192 
107 

5,178 
17,823 

1,562 
956 
3,042 
569 
510 

5,922 

$167,  576,  463 

I,fl94 

$20,063,272 

— 

6,168 

$19,  577,  463 

5,904 

892,  872 

Alabama: 
Swedish  

1 
37 

8 
6 
12 
3 
6 
11 

9 
22 
27 
16 
3 
3 

14 
13 
3 
8 
49 

9 
11 
17 
15 
1 

8 
1 
4 
6 
8 
3 

22 

8 
17 
8 
9 

15 
20 
21 
34 
18 
16 
2 

14 
24 

10 
8 
17 
8 
4 

1 
32 

7 
6 
12 
3 
6 
10 

9 
19 
26 
15 
3 
3 

14 
11 
3 

8 
45 

9 
11 
17 
15 
1 

7 
1 
4 
5 
8 
2 

20 
5 
7 
17 
6 
8 

12 
19 
IS 
34 
18 
15 

13 
23 
8 

17 
8 
3 

(l) 
529,  475 

145,  000 
59,500 
155,  050 
29,  000 
149,  500 
265,  750 

160,  000 
746,  180 
369,  815 
197,  150 
142,  700 
24,  695 

1,  017,  200 
277,  000 
45,  380 
206,  569 
2,  855,  429 

254,  000 
324,  470 
523,  399 
714,  900 
0) 

29,400 

23,500 
115,  000 
85,  800 
0 

1,  404,  500 
65,  000 
26,  900 
350,  725 
23,  700 
48,600 

-       153,  954 
847,  000 
2,  025,  600 
1,  319,  445 
506,200 
272,200 
CO 

699,  500 
2,  877,  500 

65,000 
46,200 
147,  100 
30,800 
43,000 

1 
37 

8 
6 
12 
3 
6 
11 

9 

22 
27 
16 
2 
3 

14 
13 
3 

8 
49 

9 
11 
17 
15 

1 

8 
1 
4 
6 
8 
3 

21 
4 
8 
16 
8 
9 

15 
20 
21 
34 
18 
16 
2 

13 
24 

0) 
115,  747 

27,  565 
14,  727 
18,  136 
5,952 
17,  345 
34,  595 

28,  909 
137,  491 
89,  511 
60,  690 
(i) 
14,  653 

133,  613 
81,  866 
9,470 
37,  742 
482,  193 

52,  146 
44,163 
84,  033 
105,  604 
(i) 

3,570 

0) 

5,210 
10,  908 
13,  300 
649 

123,  337 

7,945 
3,723 
59,  585 
4,865 
12,  108 

21,  589 
86,  367 
187,  544 
142,  179 
93,  323 
37,  220 
0) 

51,  581 
343,  704 

25,222 
16,  612 
32,288 
6,998 

1 
35 

8 
6 
11 
3 
6 
10 

9 
22 
27 
16 
3 
3 

14 
13 
3 

8 
48 

9 
11 
16 
14 
1 

8 
1 
4 
6 
8 
3 

19 
4 
7 
15 
6 
9 

14 
18 
20 
34 
17 
16 

e 

14 
24 

9 

• 

1' 

l 

66 
4,589 

1,420 
614 
527 
326 
701 
1,729 

1,036 
5,308 
4887 
2,261 

587 
542 

4,880 
4,210 
470 
1,371 
14,949 

2,689 
1,885 
3,394 
5,039 
356 

411 
35 
424 
670 
1,006 
150 

6,044 
451 
420 
3,062 
511 
1,079 

933 
2,044 
3,518 
3,801 
2,259 
1,268 
32 

2,854 
14,  722 

1,438 
680 
2,208 
462 
527 

Arizona: 
Arizona  

10 

1 
3 
5 

185,  414 

270 
2,554 
19,  275 

California,  Northern: 
Central  

Clear  Lake 

General 

Nevada-Sierra 

Pacific 

4 
3 

3 

14 
10 
4 
1 

24,  380 
57,805 

2,700 
125,  932 
35,  699 

10,  589 
8,795 

Pact&TYjp-Tito 

Sacramento  River.. 
San  Francisco  Bay, 
San  Joaquin.  

San  Jose.. 

Swedish  _ 

Unassociated 

California.  Southern: 
Foot  HilL 

6 
7 
2 
4 
26 

6 
6 
8 
9 

1 

5 

196,  500 
126,  928 
11,  900 
34,  900 
568,  595 

15,  485 
26,  145 
45,  655 
79,  090 
0) 

1,585 

Harbor 

Imperial  Valley  
Kern  River  

Los  Angeles 

Santa  Ana  Valley,  . 
Santa  Barbara  

Southwestern 

University  

Unassociated  

Colorado: 
Eastern  _ 

Gunmson  Valley-  — 
M!cxic£in 

Northeastern 

1 

2 

1,200 
1,475 

Northern.      . 

Northwestern 

Rocky  Mountain... 
San  Luis  Valley  
Southeastern—    _ 

9 

31,  948 

2 

7 
1 
3 

2 
8 
10 
7 
4 
3 

1 

7 

16 

fl 
1 

n 

] 
1 

2,150 
42,155 
200 
1,935 

13,  400 
124,  500 
ISO,  000 
48,  201 
17,  750 
29.800 
0) 

35,  855 
413,209 

3,875 
250 
8.400 
400 
75 

Southern 

Southwestern  _ 

Western 

Connecticut: 
Ashford-- 

Fairfield- 

Hartford 

Nw  TRTftv^Ti 

New  London  

Stonington  Union.. 
Swedish.  

Delaware: 
Delaware  

District  of  Columbia: 
Columbia 

Idaho: 
Central  

10 

Y, 

t 

4 

East  

First  

North  Idaho 

Spokane  (Wash.)  

5,851 

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 

275318—41 8 


100 


CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIEiS,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OP  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHUECH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1 936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

f 

fc 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches  ! 
reporting 

Amount 

{Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Illinois: 
Alton  

24 
12 
22 
12 
26 

84 

7,933 
3,063 
4,691 
1,659 

4;  786 

30,  500 
1,840 
2,504 
806 
2,499 

5,060 
2,439 
2,686 
4,382 
1,882 

4,808 
9,413 
5,022 
812 

588 

3,293 
2,217 
1,702 
2,272 
2,082 

3,819 
2,528 
1,316 
651 
2,641 

3,  662 
2,156 
2,361 
3,124 
11,  418 

1,540 
3,493 
1,836 
1,887 
3,257 

1,992 
2,064 
968 
599 
768 

2,117 
1,578 
479 
4,143 
1.629 

37 

1,417 
2,997 
2,380 
75 

3,651 

21 
11 
22 
11 
25 

75 
10 
11 
5 
15 

18 
14 
17 
17 
12 

28 
31 
22 
6 

4 

15 
10 
10 
6 
17 

18 
9 
5 
7 
10 

15 
18 
15 
13 

28 

8 
17 
12 
12 
14 

14 
13 
7 
6 
8 

8 
9 
3 
10 
10 

1 

12 
15 
1 

19 

1        9 

$445,  500 
518,  500 
3S9,  200 
48,487 
523,  000 

5,  557,  371 
216,  000 
146,  400 
26,  000 
282,  100 

491,450 
155,  000 
175,  600 
477,  450 
125,800 

187,350 
744,  500 
527,  700 
139,  500 
42,  300 

141,  950 
121,  100 
116,  700 
234,834 
27,  925 

191,  250 
145,600 
87,  500 
25,  700 
149,  500 

383,400 
62,  550 
60,450 
176,  700 
1,  398,  500 

156,  900 
218,  850 
92,  500 
81,  700 
357,  200 

52,  700 
84,  800 
33,  000 
8,450 
46,  600 

288,  500 
66,  700 
4,000 
527,  500 
52,  100 

113,  550 
117,  000 
85,492 
(l) 

327.400 
90,  100 

8 
4 
2 

$49,  029 
106,  000 
12,  075 

24 
12 
22 
12 
26 

83 
10 
12 
5 
15 

18 
14 
17 
18 
13 

29 
30 

24 
6 
4 

16 
12 
11 
6 
17 

18 
9 

5 
7 
10 

15 
20 
16 

14 

$91,  205 
41,  433 
45,  513 
6,844 
49,  108 

655,  240 
41,  761 
12,  819 
3,811 
37,  100 

65,  741 
16,  614 
34,  345 
66,  707 
12,  658 

32,  585 
100,  083 
118,  541 
8,854 
8,569 

23,  938 
19,  221 
15,  102 
31,  339 
6,470 

29,  041 
14,  877 
13,  035 
*  5,290 
19,  481 

49,  232 

11,  787 
8,519 
27,  151 
134,  913 

13,  723 
31,  998 
18,  212 
8,230 
26,  030 

7,945 
12,  798 
6,144 
1,127 
6,438 

28,  751 
9,169 
2,919 
39,  845 
8,352 

C1) 
10,350 
24,  944 

24 
12 
21 
12 
26 

82 
10 
12 
5 
13 

18 
14 
17 
18 
13 

29 
31 
23 
6 
4 

16 
10 
11 
6 
17 

18 
9 
5 
7 
10 

15 
20 
15 
13 
32 

8 
16 
13 

11 
16 

13 

12 
7 
6 
8 

8 
£ 

3 
11 
9 

1 
6 
13 
15 
1 

19 

8 

5,724 
2,449 
2,959 
946 
3,243 

19,  743 
1,547 
1,276 
525 
1,885 

3,821 
1,897 
2,378 
2,610 
1,181 

3,355 
8,204 
4,688 
869 
446 

2,337 
1,  855 
1,623 
1,  826 
1,248 

2,338 
1,490 
850 
418 
1,597 

2,381 
1,356 
1,082 
2,348 
9,736 

826 
2,372 
1,  357 
1,234 
2,255 

813 
1,289 
624 
389 
603 

1,463 
821 
218 
2,610 
1,011 

40 
735 
2  239 
1,200 
100 

2,209 

542 

Aurora,--    

Bloomington 

Champai  gn-Urb  ana 
Chicago  -       

5 

53 

g 

1 

42,  640 

I.  212,  850 
11,  870 
4,000 

German 

10 
12 

r 
15 

IS 
14 
17 
18 
13 

30 
31 

24 

e 

16 
12 
11 
6 

18 

18 
9 

10 

15 
20 
16 
14 

Greene-Jersey    -  -  - 

Ottawa 

1 

1 
1 

<3 

4 

3,300 

6,600 
6,000 
11,260 
23,  050 

Peoria 

Quincy 

Rock  Island 

Rock  River  

Salem 

Southern 

3 

7 
15 

2 
1 

5 
4 
2 

4 

24,  549 
74,  588 
46,  743 
5,900 
17,  000 

20,  700 
34,475 
15,  250 
16,  351 

Springfield 

Swedish            

Wabash  Valley  
Unassociated 

Indiana: 
Bedford           

Bethel-          

Brownstown 

Calumet  --  

C  off  6e  Creek 

Curry's  Prairie 

4 
1 
4 
3 

r 

6 

16,  885 
600 
27,950 
8,800 
1,500 

57,985 

Decatur  County  
East  Central 

Evansville  

Flat  Rock 

Fort  "Wayne 

Frsedom. 

Friendship 

1 
1 
10 

o 

4 
1 

58 
3,000 
91,  919 

12,000 
22,400 
130 

Harmony 

Indianapolis 

32 

8 

17 
13 
12 
16 

16 

1J 

8 
8 

1( 

11 

32 

8 
17 
13 
12 
16 

15 
IS 

8 

9 
10 
4 
11 
10 

1 
6 
13 

15 

19 

8 

Johnson  County  — 
Judson,.           

Laughery     

Linton 

Logansport     ..  

4 

7,185 

Lonff  Run 

Madison  _  

1 

600 

IVIount  Zion 

Noble-Lagrange  
Northern     

r 

c 
1 
1 
3 

11,  272 

9,700 
800 
170 
157,  673 

Orleans  

Perry  County  
SaJa/monie 

Sand  Creek 

10 

Swedish 

1 

0) 

Tlppecanoe 

13 
IS 

Union 

< 
< 

2,800 
9,700 

White  Lick 

10,  986 
0) 

42,  919 

7,005 

Unassociated 

Iowa- 
Cedar  Valley  

2( 

43,447 

Creston__  

1,036 

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


NORTHERN    BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


101 


TABLE  7,— -NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS. 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

*0 

Is 

I! 

a* 

§ 

Number  of  mem- 
bers 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Iowa—  C  ontinued  . 
Danish 

7 

2 
7 

7 
8 
10 
16 
8 

16 
9 
22 

12 

17 

16 
9 

7 
2 

25 
5 
10 
11 
11 

2 
6 

18 
18 
27 

13 
10 
9 
5 

5 

31 
12 
3 
5 

25 
8 
2 

1 
2 

12 
12 
18 
14 
15 

26 
26 
12 
14 
21 

14 
27 
9 
17 

939 
181 
320 

476 
1,678 
2,102 
5,382 
1,060 

2,756 
1,487 
5,793 
2,022 
1,896 

3,943 
1,315 
769 
94 

4,656 
516 
2,700 
•  1,245 
907 

189 
677 
4,340 
3,384 
8,681 

2,219 

791 
1,574 
724 
507 

7,758 
1,311 
398 
435 

10,  946 
1,240 
745 

164 
21 

2,332 

1,047 
3,800 
680 
895 

1,126 
1,611 
1,866 
3,054 
1,746 

1,167 
3,129 
1,258 
2,073 

7 
2 
5 

7 
7 
10 
15 
8 

16 
9 

21 

12 
17 

16 
9 
7 
2 

23 
5 
10 
11 
9 

2 

6 
18 
16 
26 

12 
10 
9 
4 
4 

30 

11 
3 
5 

24 
8 
2 

1 
2 

9 

11 
18 
12 
14 

24 
25 
12 
14 
21 

14 
26 
9 
17 

$62,  000 
0) 
26,800 

15,  300 
190,  250 
138,  845 
509,  800 
127,  000 

220,  000 
77,  100 
415,300 
278,  500 
81,  230 

400,  500 
62,  500 
49,  300 
0) 

299,  465 
39,  500 
123,  100 
61,  000 
21,  450 

23,  600 
477,  000 
181,  600 
493,  100 

119,  650 
32,  400 
120,  700 
25,  765 
18,  500 

482,  355 
65,  650 
32,  000 
40,  500 

804,  525 
83,  445 
« 

C1) 
0) 

425,  500 
114,  807 
667,  500 
41,  100 
74,000 

112,  850 
115,  500 
83,  500 
170,000 
133,  050 

127,  500 
253,650 
98,  000 
124,  400 

2 

$4,  790 

6 
2 
6 

5 
8 
10 
16 

8 

16 
9 
22 
12 
16 

16 
9 
6 
2 

25 
5 
10 
11 
11 

2 
6 
16 

18 
27 

12 
10 
9 
5 
5 

31 
12 
3 

5 

25 

8 

2 

1 
2 

12 
12 
18 
14 
14 

22 
21 
12 
13 
20 

14 
27 
9 
14 

$12,  819 
(») 
1,  ,'585 

1,438 
28,  932 
20,  754 
54,  838 
10,016 

24,  773 
8,754 
59,  214 
23,  751 
10,305 

43,  491 
24,  839 
7,  483 
C1) 

46,  208 
4,297 
33,  894 
13,  170 
4,784 

0) 
3,487 
51,  793 
24,  430 

81,  897 

9,592 
4,904 
20,  638 
5,655 
5,041 

50,  633 
34,  410 
5,019 
4,930 

119,  859 
11,  002 
0) 

8 

43,  787 
19,  421 
59,  242 
8,774 
13,  517 

16,  613 
27,  028 
25,  481 
46,  020 
19,  365 

23,695 
44,107 
13,  270 
20,752 

5 

r 

5 

8 
10 
16 
8 

14 
8 
22 

12 
16 

15 
9 
4 
2 

24 
5 
10 
11 
11 

2 
5 
17 

17 
27 

13 
9 
8 
5 
5 

31 
11 
3 
5 

25 
8 
2 

1 

2 

11 
10 
18 
12 
13 

21 
21 
11 
13 
17 

14 
26 
8 
12 

643 

80 
178 

223 
1,632 
1,477 
2,739 

721 

1,600 
1,002 
3,236 
1,  601 
1,  300 

2,271 
1,326 
4IJ4 
WO 

3,302 
463 
1,984 
914 
613 

160 
469 
2,799 
2,480 
4,418 

1,154 

548 
1,107 
458 
293 

4,927 
1,285 
375 
400 

7,632 
763 
313 

64 
45 

1,433 
733 
2,926 
516 
832 

1,148 
1,297 
1,707 
1,981 
1,238 

1,177 
2,283 
521 
1,413 

East  Grand  River.  . 

English  River  

Fox  River  

German  

2 
3 
6 
1 

4 
2 
9 
4 
1 

5 

4,600 
5,150 
16,  715 
4,375 

51,  439 
3,200 
28,  490 
14,  000 
1,300 

46,  555 

Iowa  

Mideastern.. 

Northeastern 

Northern 

Oskaloosa  _ 

Roger  Williams  
Sioux  Valley  

Southern  ___ 

Southwestern  

Swedish  

Washington 

1 

1,400 

TJnassociated..  

Kansas: 
Arkansas  Valley  
Blue  Valley  

8 
1 
1 

56,  228 
200 
1,250 

Central  _.. 

Chikaskia  

Fort  Scott 

1 

1 
1 
6 
1 
13 

3 
3 
2 
1 

770 

0) 
40 
64,  200 
1,500 
45,  483 

6,290 
4,400 
9,000 
2,650 

German 

Jewell    

Kansas  River  

Miami.   

Missouri  River  
Northeast 

Northwest  

Republican  Valley. 
Solomon  Valley  
South  Central    .. 

Southeast 

10 
4 

42,  435 
1,150 

Southwest— 

Swedish  

Upper  Solomon  
Walnut  Valley 

2 

10 
2 

4,988 

146,  275 
26,  350 

West  Central  

TJnassociated 

Kentucky 
Ohio  Valley 

Portsmouth 

Maine: 
Androscoggin  _ 

3 
2 
4 
2 
2 

2 

6,850 
2,150 
32,  110 
706 
981 

8,906 

Bowdomham—  . 

Cumberland 

Damariscotta   - 

Farmington  

Hancock  

I/incoln 

North  Aroostook.  .  _ 
North  Kennebec  
North  York 

4 
4 
1 

3 
3 
2 
3 

4,118 
6,086 
3,862 

27,  573 
14,  800 
7,650 
11,  218 

Oxford 

Penobscot 

Piscataquis 

South  Aroostook  

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  Individual  church. 


102 


CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBEBSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPEND ITUBBS,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1 9  36 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches  || 

S 

<o 

a 

*i 
fe* 

rQ 
£ 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

1« 
2| 

II 

fl 

p 
O 

a 

-< 

S*0 

-a  2 

O+3 
•~1  t-t 

II 

o 

a 

<i 

9  M> 

•fl.S 

O-p 

*•"  fe 

51 

o  *-* 

+3 
fl 

3 
o 

a 
<i 

03  W3 

•=»  B 

O±s 
**  fe 

11 

e 

JS 
"o 

•g 

CQ 

Maine—  Continued. 
South  Kennebec_-_ 
South  York 

13 

12 
16 

6 

1 

10 
11 
26 
19 
20 

23 
13 

8 
17 
15 

2 

20 
9 
19 

13 
20 
26 
1 

13 

4 

40 
13 

4 

11 
8 
16 
13 
17 

15 
12 
10 
5 
6 

16 
16 

9 
17 
15 
5 

11 
9 

f 

14 
17 

14 
8 
83 
3( 
2 

1,828 
1,646 
1,379 

804 
25 

512 
3,414 
13,877 
12,  423 
7,669 

9,627 
2,824 

1,311 
7,043 
3,759 

129 
6,036 
1,595 
5,978 

3,281 
5,669 
5,083 
136 

709 
677 
13,  105 
3,003 
839 

1,885 
966 
1,121 
1,055 
3,475 

3,076 
1,807 
1,492 
945 
388 

3,243 
2,919 

798 
1,812 
4,595 
1,365 

1,113 
920 
323 
1,907 
1,733 

2,578 
815 
9,656 

12-9i§ 

13 
12 
16 

3 

1 

8 
11 
24 
17 
20 

23 

13 

7 
17 
14 

2 

20 
8 
17 

13 
18 
26 

$437,  200 
204,  500 
111,  700 

68,500 
(0 

89,  500 
595,  850 
1,955,450 
1,  849,  670 
1,  153,  135 

2,  227,  700 
283,  235 

128,  500 
665,  975 
535,  200 

0) 
1,011,084 
182,  000 
622,  170 

497,  510 
1,  053,  050 
1,  108,  225 

2 
2 
2 

2 

$210 
31,  650 
3,195 

28,865 

13 
11 
14 

6 
1 

10 
11 
26 
19 
20 

23 

13 

8 
17 
15 

2 
20 
9 
19 

13 

20 
26 
1 

12 
4 
40 
13 
4 

11 
8 
15 
13 
17 

15 
12 
10 
5 
6 

16 
16 

9 
17 
15 
5 

10 
9 
2 

14 
17 

14 
8C 
32 

$24,  393 
30,  872 
16,  404 

13,  594 
0) 

26,  265 
51,  093 
239,  576 
231,  768 
157,  648 

215,  108 
37,  225 

23,  596 
104,  219 
53,  065 

0) 
96,  550 
37,  024 
112,  213 

49,  818 
105,  944 
100,  440 
0) 

7,729 
10,  908 
259,  868 
65,036 
12,281 

41,  151 
14,  383 
13,  631 
18,  432 
43,  012 

39,  228 
25,  133 
20f  829 
20,  951 
4,562 

50,  627 
39,  553 

10,463 
32,  738 
69,  723 
9,219 

20,  111 
14,  905 
0) 
25,  187 
24,  344 

42,  639 
12,304 
187,  441 
225,  236 
0 

12 
9 
14 

6 

1,264 
1,209 
955 

1,111 

Washington 

Maryland: 
Columbia  

Monongahela  (Pa.)- 
Massachusetts: 

9 

10 
24 
19 
19 

23 
13 

8 
17 
15 

2 

20 
8 
19 

13 

19 
25 

1 

11 
4 
39 
13 
4 

11 
8 
14 
13 
17 

15 
11 
10 
5 
5 

16 
16 

9 
16 
13 

5 

9 
8 
2 
12 
15 

14 
7 
73 
30 

462 
1,826 
9,197 
7,453 
5,243 

6,028 
1,471 

849 
3,634 
2,654 

155 
4,438 
1,083 

4,713 

1,923 
3,289 
2,849 
68 

643 
737 
14,  692 
2,715 
807 

994 
668 
1,033 
1,247 
2,873 

2,672 
1,370 
1,265 
781 
417 

2,124 
2,470 

803 
1,921 
3,981 
886 

858 
709 
230 
1,359 
1,306 

1,904 
537 
8,291 
7,393 
49 

Berkshire  ..  

2 

12 
8 
10 

7 

63,  000 
244,  404 
58,  510 
57,012 

79,  545 
34,  125 

Boston  Eatet 

Boston  North 

Boston  South 

Boston  West 

Framine^ham    

Franklin-Millers 
River 

Memmac  River  — 
Old  Colony 

7 
6 

1 
8 
2 
4 

2 
8 
3 

38,  790 
23,  850 

0) 

28,  677 
14,  500 
138,  800 

13,  000 
43,674 
10,  750 

Providence  (B.  I.)-- 

Salem    __  

Swedish 

Taunton 

Wachusett    

Westfield            

"Worcester      

Michigan: 
Alpena 

13 
4 
39 
12 
4 

11 
8 
16 
12 
17 

15 
12 
8 
5 
6 

15 
16 

9 
17 
15 
3 

11 
9 
2 

14 
17 

14 
8 
81 
28 

55,  800 
28,000 
1,  049,  910 
387,  800 
128,  000 

1,  120,  450 
76,  700 
79,  350 
62,  200 
290,  900 

236,  500 
169,  500 
63,  500 
89,500 
30,  000 

313,  000 
409,  500 

59,400 
206,400 
447,  650 
76,  500 

72,  200 
69,800 

0) 
122,  500 
143,  100 

318,000 
67,400 
720,  110 
2,  207,  559 
(9 

2 

460 

Detroit 

34 
4 
3 

4 
4 

4 
5 

3 
3 
1 

3 

c 

K 

4 

2 
6 
3 
2 

2 

531,  186 
21,  448 
8,200 

86,  289 
2,250 
1,650 
4,840 
12,  000 

6,094 
10,  840 
2,186 
5,240 
1,775 

9,550 
72,  000 

750 
9,345 
23,322 
7,686 

650 

Flint  River 

German      

Grand  River 

Grand  Traverse  
Hillsdale           

Huron        

Jackson.  .  

Kalamazoo  River... 
Kent-Muskegon  

X/enawee.      ....  

Marquette  

Osceola  —  .  

Saginaw  Valley  
Shiawassee       --  

St.    Joseph    River 

Valley..  

Swedish 

Wayne 

Unassociated  .  -  

Minnesota: 
Dane-Norwegian.  >. 

Lake  Superior  
Minnesota  Valley-. 
Northwestern  

Southeastern 

1 
2 
3 

1 
3 

26 
12 

W800 
17,500 

5,763 
3,000 
35,  133 
273,  621 

Southwestern 

Swedish  . 

Twin  City       

Unassoclatecl  

*  Amount  Included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  Individual  church. 


NORTHERN    BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


103 


TABLE  T. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

i 

a 

o£ 

is 
1 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Missouri: 
Swedish 

1 

4 
4 
3 
2 
10 
1 
6 
8 

9 
4 
8 
13 

6 

1 
8 
6 
6 

18 
17 

4 

11 

11 

8 

10 
13 
12 

14 
16 
15 
6 
11 

524 

588 
223 
384 
121 
1,739 
26 
668 
1,587 

2,587 
776 
1,450 
1,994 

650 

100 
892 
447 
1,063 

5,311 
2,157 

300 
1,392 

1,193 

937 

840 

622 

2,862 
907 

1,315 
1,  986 
1,879 
564 
308 

10,  912 
2,819 
9,822 
3,453 
4,365 

1 

4 
3 
3 
2 
10 
1 
5 
7 

9 

4 
8 
13 

6 

1 
8 
5 
5 

16 
16 

4 
10 

6 

10 

7 

10 
13 
11 

14 
15 
13 
6 
10 

45 
14 
30 
18 
20 

0) 

$27,  500 
24,  000 
14,  800 
0) 
207,  121 

101,  000 
127,  000 

211,  200 
37,500 
72,500 
158,  200 

80,100 

73,400 
18,500 
39,  499 

733,450 
200,  790 

23,000 
61,  591 

86,  450 

163,  200 
124,  000 

93,850 
264,  850 
68,700 

126,  000 
279,  800 
193,  300 
75,500 
36,  300 

1,  920,  928 
615,  000 
2,  647,  000 
755,  000 
571,  650 

1,  625,  600 

1 
3 

(') 

$5,  550 

1 

4 
4 
3 
2 
10 
1 
4 
7 

9 

4 
8 
13 

6 

1 
8 
5 
6 

18 
17 

4 
10 

7 

10 
7 

8 
13 
11 

14 
15 
15 
6 
8 

45 
14 
31 
20 
20 

17 
27 
19 
29 

C1) 

$9,  340 
4,712 
3,671 
C1) 
26,  784 

su 

21,  737 

33,449 
4,941 
12,902 
17,  436 

8,776 

('U 

2,892 
10,837 

76,  161 
21,  307 

5,446 
11,  270 

18,  777 

21,  821 
17,  478 

9,794 
35,  117 
15,  644 

23,490 
40,  197 
33,  729 
6,623 
8,586 

208,  658 
53,  551 
227,  815 
70,923 
74,844 

152,  456 
181,  608 
79,  021 
86,  568 
0) 

11,  857 
30,  Oil 

60,  841 
212,829 

27,76 
41,10 

1 

2 
3 
3 
1 
10 
1 
5 
7 

9 
4 
8 
13 

6 

1 
7 
6 
6 

18 
15 

4 
9 

7 

10 
6 

7 
12 
10 

10 
15 
14 
6 
7 

44 
14 
30 
18 
19 

16 
26 
18 
2' 

453 

381 
208 
262 
150 
995 
100 
577 
964 

1,090 
428 
730 
1,528 

516 

35 
612 
303 

755 

3,729 
1,448 

335 

968 

1,046 

723 
658 

431 

1,853 
801 

885 
1,280 
1,318 
389 
313 

11,  154 
1,657 
6,065 
1,677 
2,514 

3,117 
4,616 
3,434 
4,440 
28 

688 
992 
20 
3,654 
7,721 

1,478 
1,324 

Montana: 
Bitter  Root 

Crow  Indian 

Flathead 

German 

Rocky  Mountain- 
Swedish 

1 

4,000 

Teton 

3 
2 

5 

13,  650 
3,850 

19,  250 

Yellowstone  

Nebraska: 
Capitol 

Ouster 

I^irst  Nebraska  
Grand  Island    ..    . 

2 
2 

3 

1 
1 
1 
2 

5 
5 

1 

1,002 
8,500 

4,850 

0) 
1,864 
290 
800 

62,  150 
19,  458 

900 
3,400 

1,700 

Nebraska    Confer- 
ence, Swedish  

New  Era           __  -. 

Northeastern 

North  Platte 

Northwestern  „ 

Omaha 

Southern  Union  
Southwestern  Ger- 
man 

York,.            ..      _ 

Nevada: 
Nevada-Sierra  

New  Hampshire: 
Belknap 

Dublin  

1 

1,200 

Meredith-Sand- 
wich 

Milford           

1 

250 

New  Durham 

Newport  

1 
<• 

] 
1 

3,795 
2,075 
5,078 
1,200 

Portsmouth  

Salisbury     

White  Mountains  -- 
"Wolfeboro 

New  Jersey: 
Camden  

45 
14 

23 
8 
19 
12 
5 

9 
13 
5 
6 

258,  192 
48,878 
285,  700 
101,  675 
11,  123 

209,140 
130,  113 
125,  100 
45,  750 

Central   

East  .    

31 
20 
20 

Hudson         

Monmouth  

Morris  and  Essex- 
North       

27 
19 
29 

6 
12 

6,764 
4  973 
5,696 
30 

1,011 
2,101 

25 

18 
29 
1 

6 
12 
1 
22 
44 

"8 

1,  661,  200 
718,  500 
675,  050 
O 

105,  500 
288,  250 
0) 
574,  200 
1,  960,  550 

227,  525 
354,  800 

Trenton     

West  

TTnassociated 

( 
12 

22 
44 

1 

New  York: 
Allegany 

725 
27,321 

i: 

2 
4 

1 

Black  River 

2 

Bradford  (Pa.)  
Broome  and  Tioga— 
Buffalo        

'   26 
4,505 
13,357 

2,558 
2,003 

22 
44 

11 

2J 

31,  250 
436,  875 

23,  002 
16,  05C 

Cattaraugus 

Gavuga  

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


104 


CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of  1 
churches  | 

Number  of  mem- 
bers 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

i 

New  York  —  Con. 
Chautauqua  » 

23 

15 

15 

10 

20 
27 

20 

34 
10 
54 

3,464 
3,666 
1,884 

23 
15 

15 

10 

19 

27 

19 

34 
10 
52 
12 

11 
34 
13 
20 
18 

22 
8 
13 
7 
8 

11 
17 
12 

42 
6 
23 

1 
9 
20 
12 
10 
2 

30 
9 

3 
3 
2 

8 
3 

$400,  400 
550,  000 
193,  500 

237,  000 
285,  200 

112,  000 
289,  500 
548,  600 

715,  700 

1,  904,  350 
53,  500 
3,  747,  113 
229,  600 

268,  900 
5,  218,  797 
398,  900 
575,  000 
1,  222,  795 

350,  000 
236,  000 
187,  000 
97,  600 
27,  250 

217,  000 
900,  200 
197,  100 

12,  479,  650 
40,  000 
324,  300 

CO 
131,  000 
451,  500 
275,  000 
56,900 
0) 

175,  050 
22,  200 

16,  000 
12,  700 
0) 

174,  700 
5,400 

5 
i 

i 

I 

k 

6 

6 

14 
1 
28 

1 

3 
16 

F 

9 

6 
2 

2 
1 

$9,  550 
17,  230 
150 

28,  950 
11,  700 

800 
12,  915 
62,  175 

46,  708 

137,  570 
100 
393,  829 
1,600 

4,750 
2,  273,  742 

27,  148 
24,  424 

23 

15 
15 

10 

20 
27 

20 

34 

10 
54 
12 

12 
36 
13 
20 

18 

23 

8 
12 
7 
8 

11 
16 
12 

50 
7 
23 

1 
9 
19 
12 
8 
2 

32 
8 

3 
3 
3 

8 
2 
1 

8 
11 
10 
16 
10 

9 
4 
35 

16 
2?, 

$54,  304 
53,  157 
22,  853 

38,  280 
29,  508 

12,  792 
45,  731 
53,  845 

64,  315 

185,  033 
8,908 
374,  708 
24,  663 

30,  708 
249,  031 
56,  630 
119,  183 
100,  382 

40,703 
18,  401 
19,  555 
14,  355 
5,154 

21,  204 
72,  176 
28,  930 

743,414 
7,799 
49,  208 

(0 
18,  627 
47,  594 
27,  818 
7,130 
(i) 

33,  532 
4,087 

3,118 
1,676 
1,377 

36,  910 

8 

2,920 
69,  933 
36,  858 
33,  939 
8,267 

3,141 
3,744 
256,069 
21,  455 
81.628 

22 
15 
13 

6 
10 

18 
27 

18 
3£ 

54 
11 

11 
35 
13 
18 
17 

22 
8 
12 

7 
4 

11 
16 
10 

48 
7 
24 

1 
8 
18 
12 
5 
2 

30 
7 

2 
2 
2 

7 
2 
1 

8 
11 
10 
15 
10 

9 
4 
34 
13 
20 

2,570 
2,269 
1,280 

1,238 
733 

337 
1,921 
2,705 

1,859 

4,594 
327 

•9,255 
957 

1,300 
7,063 
2,353 
2,300 
3,573 

1,838 
949 
1,022 
690 
145 

862 
2,524 
947 

10,  893 
368 
2,445 

152 
502 
1,532 
1,374 
336 
244 

4,245 
404 

219 
110 
54 

844 
225 
15 

360 
3,966 
1,744 
2,398 
1,055 

399 
406 
7,969 
1,352 
3.  008 

Chemung  River  
Clienanso 

Cortland 

1,886 
1,400 

756 
3,173 
4,029 

3,866 

7,8B2 
*      695 
16,  685 
1,427 

2,403 
13,  349 
3,581 
4,653 
6,100 

3,092 
1,785 
ll476 
1,154 
507 

1,350 
5,029 
1,812 

46,  736 
658 
4,046 

202 
968 
3,432 
1,974 
865 
418 

3,089 
547 

408 
212 
144 

1,585 
200 
13 

420 
4,126 
2,193 
3,087 
1,331 

571 
511 
12,632 
2,064 
4925 

Dutchess 

Essex  and   Cham- 
plain  

Franklin  

Genesee  _ 

Hudson  River  Cen- 
tral   

Hudson     River 

North    .. 

Lake  George      

Long  Island 

Madison 

12 

12 
36 
13 
20 
18 

25 
8 
13 
7 
8 

11 
17 
12 

51 
7 
24 

1 
9 

20 
12 
11 
2 

32 
9 

3 
4 
3 

8 
3 
1 

8 
11 
10 
17 
10 

9 
4 
35 
16 
22 

Mohawk  River  
Monroe 

Niagara. 

Oneida 

Onondaga  

324,  350 

4,154 
1,350 
7,250 
100 

Ontario-Yates  

Orleans  

Oswego 

Otsego  

Rensselaerville 

St.  Lawrence  

1 

7 

735 
110,  700 

Saratoga  

Seneca 

Southern     New 
York  

16 

2,  372,  455 

Stephentown 

Steuben  

3 

51,  012 

Swedish 

Union  

Washington-Union. 
Wayne  

3 

1 
2 

5 

8,200 
4,000 
(') 

4,700 

Worcester  _ 

Unassociated. 

North  Dakota: 
German  Conference 
Northwestern  

Norwegian  Confer- 
ence    ._ 

1 
1 

290 
500 

Red  River  Valley  __ 
Russian  Conference 

Sheyenne  River  
Swedish  Conference 
Unassociated  

Ohio: 
A  flams  

2 
1 

28,100 
300 

8 
7 
10 
15 
10 

8 
4 
30 
16 
20 

36,  200 
300,  000 
289,  520 
220,  700 
75,  250 

16,  300 
27,000 
2,  360,  300 
169,  700 
656,  300 

Akron 

6 
5 
4 
2 

103,  900 
16,  019 
17,  756 
8,386 

Ashtabula 

Auglaize  

Cambridge  

Central 

ClprmoTit. 

Cleveland 

17 
2 
4 

375,  810 
4,050 
134.  895 

Clinton  

Columbus  

*  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of 
any  individual  churcli. 


NORTHERN   BAPTIST  CONVENTION 


105 


TABLE  7.— NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936— Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

1 
a 

"o  j2 

,Q 
fc 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHUECH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporthlg 

1 

02 

Ohio—  Con. 
Coshocton  _  .    ..  _ 

11 
29 
6 

e 

7 

6 
8 
10 
18 
13 

23 
11 
13 
12 
9 

1 
4 
1 
13 
11 

9 
15 
6 
1 

9 

17 
£ 
6 
j 

£ 

1C 
10 
13 

24 
6 
15 
8 
11 

3] 
29 

1\ 

18 
IS 
* 
8 
11 

1,104 
7,929 
814 
968 
1,616 

876 
718 
1,977 
2,137 
2,458 

10,  860 
1,596 
1,990 
1,815 
1,375 

40 
405 
175 
3,733 
3,344 

3,753 
2,829 
2,374 

514 

1,657 

4,027 
267 
1,403 
636 
767 

223 

928 
2,700 

1,401 
4,194 

6,944 
979 
3,718 
1,139 
1,078 

55 
7,503 
5,588 

552 
1,558 

2,735 

2,777 
162 
1,588 
1,167 

11 
28 
6 
5 

7 

6 
8 
10 
13 
13 

23 
10 
11 
11 
8 

1 
4 
1 
12 
10 

9 
13 

6 
1 

9 

16 
3 
6 
5 
6 

3 

5 
9 

10 
11 

23 
6 
15 
8 
11 

1 
31 
29 

3 
12 

17 
12 
2 

8 
8 

$51,  000 
766,  800 
17,  350 
83,  ftOO 
54,500 

60,  500 
20,  750 
325,  000 
79,  450 
243,  300 

1,  652,  345 
103,  400 
23,  400 
123,  000 
80,  700 

10,  300 
(0 
842,  625 
365,  200 

324,  000 
253,  700 
192,  000 
0) 

63,050 

221,  540 
9,500 
120,  000 
34,  400 
87,  100 

30,500 
29,  050 
266,  610 

160,  754 
386,  900 

838,  000 
132,500 
383,600 
91,700 
54,300 

1,  039,  000 
907,  580 

45,  500 
J  64,  650 

366,  500 
212,  170 
(') 
368,  000 
60,  500 

11 
29 
6 
5 

7 

6 
8 
10 

17 
13 

23 
11 
13 
12 
9 

1 
3 
1 
12 
11 

9 

14 
6 
1 

9 

16 
3 
6 
5 
7 

3 

5 
10 

10 
13 

24 

6 
15 
8 
11 

1 
31 

28 

g 
13 

17 
13 

I 
9 

$9,  036 
107,  177 
1,469 
10,  530 
15,  720 

8,417 
4,271 
23,006 
17,003 
25,  741 

260,  049 
15,  481 
4,289 
14,  782 
13,  091 

S'918 

63,  946 
36,  989 

36,  716 
28,294 
20,  171 
0) 

10,  142 

46,  878 
3,862 
34,  817 
6,300 
10,420 

3,206 
9,247 
35,  551 

19,  362 
55,  406 

88,079 
13,  292 
57,  564 
14,  696 
10,543 

132,  631 
91,  654 

7,855 
20,405 

26,553 
36,  138 
0) 
29,906 
9,342 

11 

28 
6 
6 

7 

6 
8 
10 
14 
13 

23 
9 
13 
12 
6 

1 
3 
1 
13 
11 

8 
14 
6 
1 

9 

15 
3 
6 
5 
7 

3 
5 
10 

9 

12 

22 
6 
15 
7 
10 

1 
29 

24 

718 
5,848 
255 
703 
1,143 

652 
436 
1,  504 
1,246 
2,274 

8,465 
817 
1,189 
1,356 
959 

70 
205 
155 
3,055 
2,449 

2,823 
2,165 
1,960 

575 

738 

2,137 
302 
1,193 
491 
639 

255 
517 
1,745 

1,198 
2,650 

4,247 
663 
3,185 
791 
710 

20 
5,642 
4,458 

315 
1,212 

2,196 
1,892 
146 
1,256 
1,148 

Dayton 

9 

$41,  200 

Gallia 

Huron 

1 
3 

2 

1.000 
1,100 

3,475 

Lawrence 

Lorain    

Mad  River 

Mansfield 

2 

1 
2 

9 
1 

39,  100 
3,900 
4,951 

211,  050 
950 

Marietta 

Marion 

Miami 

Mount  Vernon  
Ohio  (Independent) 
Pomeroy 

2 
2 

600 
17,000 

Ports1"1"1  °nth 

Providence 

Rio  Grande 

Swedish  

1 
3 
6 

3 
2 
3 
1 

2 

3 
1 
2 

0) 
32,  500 
16,  470 

11,  100 
8,200 
11,  099 
0) 

7,600 

23,  000 
5,400 
3,750 

Toledo  

Trumbull 

Wooster 

Zanesville  

Zoar 

Unassociated 

Oklahoma: 
Western  Oklahoma- 
Indian 

Oregon: 
Central-  Willamette 
Deschutes 

German 

Grande  Ronde  
Rogue  River  

2 

9,748 

Swedish 

Umatilla 

TTrnprjiia 

4 
3 
5 

11 
1 
7 
2 
3 

1 
12 
8 

1 
3 

5 

n 

4 

14,  184 
8,770 
30,  270 

77,164 
750 
25,  772 
535 
2,025 

101,  411 
138,  433 

4,084 
3,595 

15,  418 
842 

Willamette  —  Out- 
side 

Willamette—  Port- 
land.        ..  

Pennsylvania: 
Abington  - 

Allegheny  River  

Beaver  

Bradford    .    . 

Bridgewater- 

Broome  and  Tiosca 
(New  York)  
Central  Union  
Centre 

Chemung  River 
(New  York)  
Clarion 

1J 

16 
1J 

I 
11 

Clearfield  

French  Creek  

TT&rrisbTirg 

(. 

37,450 
3,500 

Indiana  

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


106 


CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  mem- 
bers 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

i  Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Pennsylvania—  Con. 
Monongahela  

26 
40 
33 
21 
67 

65 
23 
12 
1 
1 

17 
28 
10 
11 
16 
13 

26 
21 
18 
24 

9 
11 
4 
15 
6 

5 
2 
9 
4 

1 

8 

5 

1 
9 

8 

15 
10 
11 
14 

11 
11 
8 
7 
1 

6 

2 
13 
25 
13 
15 

5,449 
10,  467 
6,680 
4,588 
38,  045 

17,  782 
4,316 
2,711 
83 
179 

2,385 
2,494 
748 
2,652 
2,627 
4,657 

2,449 
5,530 
3,068 
7,702 

919 
1,488 
236 
2,306 
701 

407 
166 
1,783 
515 

17 

1,376 

536 

60 
1,023 
1,331 

2,736 
1,004 
1,358 
1,949 

1,413 
1,725 
1,083 
527 
60 

985 

S3 
3,985 
5,692 
2,017 
2.129 

25 
39 
31 
20 
63 

59 
20 
9 
1 
1 

17 
24 

11 
15 
11 

24 
19 
15 
21 

8 
11 

15 

6 

5 
1 
9 
4 

1 

8 

4 

1 
9 

8 

14 

8 
10 
13 

11 
10 
8 
7 
1 

e 

2 
13 
24 
13 
13 

$419,  600 
1,  667,  400 
807,  500 
705,  800 
4,  956,  750 

3,  386,  154 
710,  500 
425,  500 
0) 
0) 

126,  000 
147,  050 
64,  000 
398,  000 
276,  300 
289,  000 

219,  000 
1,  052,  285 
318,  900 
1,  163,  000 

152,  000 
150f  600 
30,  100 
122,  600 
128,  900 

39,  550 

197,  000 
49,  000 

0) 

350,  000 
102,  500 

78,  600 
145,  500 

353,  300 

77,  425 
129,  500 
205,  700 

91,  400 
67,  725 
90,300 
34,500 
0) 

146,000 

0) 
598,  300 
586,  649 
145,  150 
294.  000 

8 
21 
11 
13 
29 

36 
9 
3 

$10,  519 
212,  258 
40,  780 
140,  985 
407,  419 

753,  673 
164,  245 
27,  800 

26 
40 
31 
21 
67 

64 
23 
12 
1 
1 

17 
27 
9 
11 
15 
13 

24 
21 
18 
24 

9 
11 
4 
15 
6 

5 
2 
9 
4 

1 

8 

5 

1 
9 

8 

15 
9 
11 
14 

11 
11 
8 
7 
1 

6 

2 
13 
25 
13 

15 

$43,  030 
227,  819 
87,  840 
63,868 
475,  750 

284,  823 
74,  002 
54,  746 
0) 
0) 

18,  458 
21,  634 
9,533 
42,827 
37,876 
32,  523 

39,  311 
114,  244 
62,193 
160,  702 

10,  530 
14,  167 
2,739 
34,  409 
10,  942 

4,307 

22,  493 
6,095 

0) 

20,  545 

10,  528 

C1) 
12,  535 
21,  994 

32,  196 
13,  028 
17,  564 
25,  905 

20,795 
25,  702 
13,  746 
9,001 
(*) 

10,  042 

55,  007 
81,087 
24;  999 
39.  832 

26 
40 
31 
21 
64 

63 
22 
12 
1 

1 

17 
26 
10 
11 
15 
13 

20 

21 
17 
24 

8 
10 
4 
15 
0 

4 
2 
9 

4 

1 

8 

4 

1 
7 

7 

15 
9 
9 
13 

11 
11 
6 
7 
1 

5 

2 
12 
25 
12 
15 

3,762 
10,  296 
5,067 
3,463 
18,  675 

11,481 
3,522 
2,533 
29 
210 

1,828 
1,797 
589 
2,235 
2,216 
1,784 

1,220 
3,  658 
1,993 
4,783 

608 
966 
251 
2,397 

758 

335 

145 
1,134 
465 

41 

947 

222 

46 
468 
745 

1,079 
525 
724 
983 

1,369 
1,482 
829 
541 
65 

608 

73 
2,723 
4,856 
1,669 
1.605 

North  Philadelphia. 
Northumberland  .  .  . 
Oil  Creek,    .. 

Philadelphia..  .. 

Pittsburgh,  

Reading  

Riverside  

Steuben 

Swedish 

Ten  Mile 

Tioga.    .__ 

4 
3 
6 
3 

6 

4 
4 
3 
10 

3 
3 

7,200 
5,700 
47,  210 
21,  609 
72,  307 

10,  775 
20,  380 
7,652 
136,  275 

9,300 
10,  075 

Wayne  . 

Welsh    ... 

Wyoming 

Unassociated- 

Rhode  Island: 
Narra^ansett 

Providence. 

Roger  Williams  
Warren  _ 

South  Dakota: 
Black  Hills  

Central 

Danish-Norwegian 
German 

4 
2 

1 
1 
2 
1 

2,125 
12,  750 

12,000 

°U 

325 

Northern 

Northwestern 

Rosebud 

Southern-  _ 

Swedish 

Texas: 
Swedish 

Utah: 
Utah  State  Conven- 
tion 

4 
1 

16,  515 
1,900 

Vermont: 
Addison 

Berkshire   (Massa- 
chusetts)   .- 

Danville  

Lamoille.- 

2 

2 
2 
1 
2 

4 
3 
3 

1 

3,751 

25,870 
3,390 
75 
10,  850 

1,880 
6,510 
5,418 
200 

Shaftsburv  , 

Vermont  Central  .  .  . 
Windham,._  

Woodstock  

Washington: 
Bellingham  Bay  
Central  „_ 

Cowlitz 

Overman 

Idaho  State  — 

Mount     Pleasant- 
Palouse.  .. 

2 

23,  146 

Norwegian-  Danish 
Conference.  

Puget  Sound  . 

8 
9 
6 

7 

118,  435 
81,  195 
4,325 
22.  469 

Seattle    

Spokane 

Swedish  

1  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


NORTHERN    BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


107 


TABLE  7, — NXJMBBR  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

1 

r 

J3 
£ 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHUKCH  EDIFICES 

EXPENDITtJEES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

1 

J3 
& 

West  Virginia: 
Broad  Run.  

26 
22 
11 
34 
9 

15 
11 
43 
35 
21 

19 
45 
31 
43 
22 

12 
26 
34 
35 
24 

1 
24 
20 
2 

8 
1 
8 
6 
11 

4 
12 
20 
2 
21 

5 
15 
15 
14 
1 

9 
11 
4 

1 

3,052 
2,289 
813 
3,423 
2,126 

1,278 
1,167 
5,629 
8,696 
1,534 

1,306 
4,867 
4,010 
8,367 
2,163 

2,626 
4,307 
4,773 
3,716 
3,936 

104 
3,738 
3,790 
138 

727 
11 
1,164 
1,640 
1,325 

687 
1,419 
4,234 
311 
2,098 

352 
1,597 
1,975 
2,068 
19 

1,039 
1,651 
1,215 
112 

22 
20 
11 
27 
9 

15 
10 
40 
34 
17 

18 
41 
29 
35 
20 

11 
24 
27 
24 
21 

1 
20 
18 
2 

8 
1 
6 
6 
11 

4 
12 
18 
2 
21 

5 
15 
15 
14 
1 

9 
11 
4 
1 

$131,  200 
42,  280 
33,  075 
92,  600 
94,  500 

31,  900 
43,800 
268,  050 
572,  900 
50,  500 

35,  700 
102,015 
161,450 
803,450 
43,  500 

112,  600 
377,  009 
276,  121 
121,800 
189,  400 

143,  450 
134,  300 
C) 

79,  975 

86,000 
208,  500 
121,800 

70,000 
134,  600 
612,832 
C1) 
179,  550 

66,  000 
190,  950 
274,000 
291,000 
C1) 

80,300 
122,  400 
73,  000 
G) 
726,  000 

1 

$50 

26 
21 
11 
29 
9 

14 
9 
41 
35 
20 

19 
44 
30 
43 
21 

12 
26 
33 
35 
22 

1 

24 
20 
1 

8 
1 
8 
6 
11 

4 
11 
20 
2 
21 

5 
15 
15 
14 
1 

9 
10 
4 
1 

$17,  141 
9,674 
3,276 
12,  626 
20,  941 

4,059 
6,929 
27,  930 
85,  022 
7,247 

5,089 
19,  380 
18,  262 
86,  170 
4,009 

20,  026 
37,  087 
34,  259 
22,  784 
24,  746 

(*) 
21,  383 
19,  620 
0) 

10,  838 
0) 
13,099 
24,646 
19,  139 

10,  787 
20,617 
92,540 
C1) 
33,  538 

6,044 
29,037 
34,  703 
30,  392 
0) 

12,  918 
20,280 
9,575 
C1) 
123,  887 

26 
21 
10 

28 
8 

12 
8 
37 
35 
15 

18 
42 
29 
39 
18 

12 
25 
30 
25 
23 

1 
23 

18 
2 

7 
1 
7 
6 
9 

4 
11 
19 
2 
21 

4 
15 
15 
14 

2,128 
1,778 
485 
2,689 
1,079 

682 
622 
3,239 
8,145 
1,021 

945 
3,603 
2,070 
6,412 
956 

1,954 
2,944 
3,482 
2,534 
2,787 

45 
2,584 
1,881 
154 

601 
22 
686 
847 
732 

524 
1,006 
2,874 
105 
1,784 

278 
1,552 
1,517 
1,042 

Coal  River  

Eastern  „_ 

1 
2 
2 

3,259 
1,115 
3,348 

Elk  Valley    . 

Fairmont 

Good  Hope  

Goshen 

1 
6 
8 

1,000 
12,  540 
69,825 

Greenbrier  

Guyandotte  

Harmony  

Harris  ville      

Hopewell 

1 
1 
5 

12 
6,800 
32,  820 

Judson 

Kanawha  Valley..- 
Mount  Pisgah  * 

Panhandle 

1 
1 
3 
1 

4 

5,677 
1,600 
25,  650 
9,000 
14,  092 

P  arkersburg    

Raleigh 

Rock  Castle 

Teays  Valley 

Ten   Mile    (Penn- 
sylvania) 

Twelve  Pole  

1 
3 

1 

2 
1 
4 
1 
4 

2 

1 
10 
2 
10 

2 
9 
6 
5 

11,  500 
6,300 
0 

2,025 

9,935 
27,800 
1,655 

5,500 
6,000 
116,  726 
(') 
25,  645 

1,665 
27,240 
21,  100 
4,  004 

Union  

Unassoeiated  

Wisconsin: 
Central  

German  

Green  Bay  

Janesville  

La  Crosse..    -  

Lincoln    __.      _ 

Madison  „      

Milwaukee 

Northern 

Northwestern 

Southwestern 

Swedish  Conference 
Walworth  

Winnebago  

Unassoeiated 

Wyoming: 
Big  Horn  -      

4 
6 
1 

5,650 
19,202 
2,200 

9 
10 
3 

1 

812 
1,311 
735 
125 

Central 

Southern         

Swedish  
Combinations 



94,900 

*  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 
HISTORY  AND  ORGANIZATION 

Northern  Baptist  origins. — Beginning  with  the  oldest  branches  of  Northern  Bap- 
tist activity,  Baptist  work  before  the  war  of  the  American  Revolution  was  confined 

i  This  statement  was  furnished  by  Dr.  Clarence  M.  Gallup,  recording  secretary,  Northern  Baptist  Con- 
vention, New  York,  N.  Y« 


108  CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIEiS,    1936 

to  plans  of  individual  local  churches  and  small  groups  of  neighboring  churches, 
called  associations.  These  associational  groups  appeared  in  Virginia,  Rhode 
Island,  New  Jersey,  and  Pennsylvania;  and  gradually  the  associations  themselves 
came  to  stand  together  for  the  propagation  of  their  form  of  faith,  for  the  general 
principle  of  freedom  of  conscience  in  religious  concerns,  and  for  mutual  defense  of 
their  forms  of  organization.  The  first  Baptist  commonwealth,  founded  in  Rhode 
Island  by  Roger  Williams,  an  associate  of  men  like  Cromwell  and  Milton  in 
England  and  of  Governor  Winthrop  in  the  New  England  colonies,  grew  into  areas 
of  influence  like  that  of  the  Philadelphia  Association  which,  in  turn,  was  the  mother 
of  other  associations  like  the  Warren  Association,  in  Rhode  Island.  George 
Washington,  Thomas  Jefferson,  and  Benjamin  Franklin  all  acknowledged  indebt- 
edness to  the  Baptists  of  Virginia  and  Rhode  Island  for  principles  so  well  estab- 
lished and  proven  valid  that  they  embodied  them  in  their  drafts  of  the  Declaration 
of  Independence  and  of  the  Constitution  of  the  United  States.  These  early 
associations  established  libraries,  schools,  colleges,  and  churches  in  their  humble 
and  meager  way,  some  of  which  have  become  institutions  of  national  prominence 
and  great  fame*.  But  it  was  not  until  the  nineteenth  century  that  Baptists  in 
the  North  had  grown  to  numbers  large  enough,  and  means  of  travel  and  communi- 
cation had  become  sufficiently  general  through  the  railroad  and  the  telegraph,  for 
the  denomination,  along  with  other  denominations,  to  envision  an  organic  and 
organized  career  for  the  group  as  a  whole. 

Northern  Baptists  after  separation  from  the  South. — The  Northern  Baptist  churches 
withdrew  from  organic  connection  with  the  Southern  Baptist  churches  about 
1844.  While  it  is  generally  supposed  that  this  rift  was  caused  by  differences  of 
opinion  regarding  slavery,  as  was  the  case  in  some  other  denominations,  the  real 
reason  for  the  breach  was  a  difference  over  the  method  of  raising  and  distributing 
missionary  moneys. 

After  this  adjustment  had  been  made,  the  churches  of  the  North  and  their  group 
organizations  moved  ahead  with  new  growth  and  energy.  The  heated  contro- 
versies concerning  theological  and  denominational  ideologies,  which  had  character- 
ized the  late  eighteenth  century  and  the  early  nineteenth,  had  been  succeeded  by 
a  spirit  of  realism  and  of  need  for  associated  effort  in  the  new  group.  It  was  a  period 
of  building  vehicles  for  moving  the  projects  mutually  sponsored  by  the  churches. 
The  American  Baptist  Missionary  Union  (later  named  the  American  Baptist 
Foreign  Mission  Society),  the  American  Baptist  Home  Mission  Society,  and  the 
American  Baptist  Publication  Society  all  were  organized  in  the  early  nineteenth 
century,  before  the  Northern  and  Southern  Baptist  separation;  and  they  pro- 
ceeded" vigorously  with  their  work,  which  has  been  maintained  with  great  enter- 
prise ever  since. 

Organization  of  a  new  denomination. — A  great  change  in  the  methods  of  the 
Northern  Baptists  resulted  from  the  formation  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Conven- 
tion, at  Washington,  D.  C.,  in  1907.  In  this  scheme  of  things,  the  convention 
exists  as  a  corporation,  chartered  under  the  laws  of  the  State  of  New  York,  with 
broad  powers  to  conduct  religious  work,  receive  and  expend  funds,  act  as  financial 
trustee,  and  affiliate  itself  with  other  similar  bodies.  Previously,  the  churches 
operated  through  their  missionary  societies.  Now,  they  united  their  far-flung 
interests  in  an  inclusive  corporation. 

Following  this  arrangement,  the  aforesaid  three  societies,  together  with  the 
Woman's  American  Baptist  Foreign  Mission  Society  and  the  Woman's  American 
Baptist  Home  Mission  Society,  became  so-called  "Cooperating  Organizations"  of 
the  convention,  although  maintaining  their  own  charters,  powers  of  self-direction, 
and  management.  The  convention  also  instituted  and  caused  to  be  incorpo- 
rated the  Board  of  Education  to  supervise  the  work  of  the  denomination  among 
Baptist  schools  and  colleges,  and  the  Ministers  and  Missionaries  Benefit  Board  to 
collect  and  distribute  funds  for  the  financial  relief  of  needy  Baptist  ministers  and 
missionaries,  their  widows  and  dependent  children.  In  1920  the  Ministers  and 
Missionaries  Benefit  Board  adopted  a  retiring  pension  plan  as  a  means  of  definite 
contributory  pensions  for  ministers  at  the  age  of  65,  based  on  salaries  and  terms 
of  service. 

Later  developments  in  organization,  by  which  the  work  of  this  convention  was 
ramified,  included  a  closer  relationship  of  the  Baptist  State  conventions  of  the 
Northern  convention  territory  and  the  better  grade  of  local  City  Mission  Societies 
with  the  Northern  Convention  itself,  under  the  classification  "Affiliated  Organi- 
zations." The  "Cooperating  Organizations"  and  the  "Affiliated  Organizations" 
assist  the  convention  in  raising  and  distributing  funds  under  that  which  is  known 
as  the  "cooperative  plan,"  with  a  "unified  budget."  Other  organizations  related 


NOETHERN   BAPTIST   CONVENTION  109 

to  or  associated  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  are  the  American  Baptist 
Historical  Society,  Baptist  Young  People's  Union  of  America,  National  Council 
of  Northern  Baptist  Men,  and  Ministers  Council. 

The  constituent  factor  in  the  Northern  Baptist  group  is  the  local  church.  Each 
church  is  independent  of  every  other  church  and  of  the  convention  itself,  except 
as  they  act  together  by  agreement.  The  convention  sessions  are  delegated 
assemblies,  composed  of  delegates  from  the  churches,  duly  accredited,  and  ex-of- 
ficio  delegates  from  certain  national  and  State  bodies.  The  managing  body  of 
the  convention  is  the  General  Council,  when  the  convention  is  not  in  session; 
but  the  convention,  when  in  session,  has  supreme  authority  in  its  own  affairs. 
The  most  continuously  and  widely  active  body  among  the  convention  councils  is 
the  Council  on  Finance  and  Promotion,  which  promotes  giving  among  individuals 
and  churches,  and  manages  the  collection  of  funds  for  the  unified  budget,  except 
as  the  various  organizations  secure,  on  their  own  initiative,  "designated"  gifts. 
Other  councils  for  special  activities  are  the  Council  on  Christian  Education  and 
the  Council  on  World  Evangelization.  Besides  these  councils,  many  committees, 
elected  or  appointed  annually  or  for  longer  periods,  function  according  to  their 
obvious  purposes  as  indicated  by  their  names,  such  as  law,  finance,  budget  research, 
resolutions,  American  home,  Baptist  bodies  using  foreign  languages,  city  missions, 
conference  with  other  religious  bodies,  denominational  calendar,  historical  libraries 
and  societies,  homes  and  hospitals,  public  relations,  social  service,  race  relations, 
State  conventions,  traffic  bureau — and  other  committees  appointed  for  immediate 
service  only.  All  the  foregoing  councils  and  committees  are  amenable  to  the 
advice  of  the  General  Council. 

Organic  union  of  the  various  missionary  societies  of  the  denomination  has  been 
broached  several  times,  but  legal  and  pragmatic  difficulties  have  failed  to  be 
surmounted  at  such  times.  Nevertheless,  the  present  arrangement  has  resulted 
in  some  elimination  of  expenditures  and  of  overlapping  in  methods,  and  has 
tended  toward  a  unity  and  efficiency  which  were  sadly  lacking  40  years  before. 

Financial  acquisitions. — In  its  financial  undertakings,  the  Northern  Baptist 
Convention  has  had  reasonably  good  success.  Many  millions  of  dollars  have 
been  raised  for  its  general  business,  as  shown  by  the  pledges  for  its  united  work, 
received  in  the  so-called  New  World  Movement,  amounting  to  approximately 
$52,000,000,  payable  over  a  period  of  5  years.  From  this  income  and  that  from 
invested  funds,  vast  advance  projects  were  launched;  educational  institutions 
were  strengthened  or  endowed;  churches  and  mission  stations  were  built;  new 
fields  at  home  and  abroad  were  opened;  more  missionaries  were  commissioned; 
great  publishing  enterprises  were  begun.  Through  a  period  of  approximately  a 
century,  from  the  group  of  a  few  original  societies  to  the  present  seven  major 
denominational  societies  and  boards,  the  assets  of  these  organizations  have 
attained  the  amount  of  $58,981,196.  In  addition  to  these  funds,  the  property 
and  endowment  assets  of  the  churches  of  the  denomination  are  now  $193,512,662, 
and  of  its  schools  and  colleges  $254,738,176.  These  figures  do  not  include  assets 
of  State  conventions  nor  city  mission  societies,  nor  of  associated  organizations, 
which  are  very  varied  and  scattered.  During  the  fiscal  year  1935-36,  the  churches 
spent  $14,262,740  for  operating  expenses  and  contributed  $2,258,792  for  missions. 

Social  service. — The  general  social  and  philanthropic  attitudes  of  this  Con- 
vention are  exhibited  in  service  rendered  by  many  city  mission  societies  and  their 
sociological  centers;  studies  of  the  American  home;  coordination  of  religious 
bodies  using  foreign  languages;  conferences  on  race  relations;  furtherance  of 
historical  research;  establishment  of  Baptist  homes  for  the  aged  and  orphans,  and 
hospitals  for  all;  promotion  of  social  reforms;  and  youth-training  enterprises. 

Interdenominational  relationships. — The  denomination  has  reacted  favorably 
in  some  measure  to  the  tendency  toward  cooperation  and  unity  among  the 
Christian  denominations.  Not  only  are  the  donations  noted  in  a  previous 
paragraph  made  to  the  Federal  Council  of  Churches  of  Christ  in  America  and  to 
the  World  Council  of  Churches,  but  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  sends 
nearly  a  score  of  delegates  annually  to  the  Federal  Council  and  sent  representa- 
tives to  the  first  and  preliminary  meeting  of  the  World  Council.  Several  of  the 
members  of  the  convention  serve  on  the  executive  committee  of  the  Federal 
Council.  Closer  relations  than  formerly  are  now  maintained  with  the  General 
Baptists,  the  Disciples  of  Christ,  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention,  and  the 
National  Baptist  Convention.  Fraternal  delegates  are  sent  as  messengers  ^  to 
various  Baptist  bodies  in  Canada.  In  its  wider  affiliations,  the  denomination 
shares  importantly  in  official  ranks  and  in  forensic  honors  among  the  great  eccle- 
siastical councils  of  the  world,  such  as  those  at  Oxford,  Edinburgh,  Utrecht,  and 
elsewhere.  About  25  years  ago  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  received  into 


110  census1  OF  BELIGIOUS  BODIES,  1936 

full  fellowship  and  all  privileges  of  service  the  Free  Will  Baptists.  During  the 
World  War,  the  convention  provided  its  quota  in  the  Chaplain  Corps  oi  the 
United  States  Army  and  in  the  Bed  Cross  organizations. 

Size  of  the  denomination.—  In  1936,  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  reported 
7,716  churches  with  1,458,811  members  and  with  8,300  pastors  and  missionaries. 
There  were  Sunday  schools  to  the  number  of  6,732,  with  an  enrollment  of  1,150,891. 
Statistics  concerning  the  missionary  and  philanthropic  organizations  are  given  in 
other  sections  of  this  review. 

DOCTRINE 

The  doctrinal  requisites  for  Baptists  are  at  an  almost  irreducible  minimum. 
Although  various  groups  and  assemblies,  at  various  times,  have  endeavored  to 
formulate  "Confessions  of  Faith/'  such  as  the  "New  Hampshire  Confes^on'  ; 
and  although  many  local  churches  have  "Articles  of  Faith"  and  "Church  Cove- 
nants/' these  last  are  adopted  by  the  individual  churches,  are  for  their  own  use 
locally  and  are  binding  on  no  other  churches  than  the  ones  which  adopted  them. 
Even  in  the  local  church  there  is  wide  liberty  of  opinion  permitted  concerning  these 
doctrinal  statements.  The  number  and  length  of  them  tends  steadily  to  decrease. 
One  reason  for  this  light  hold  of  creedal  statement  is  that  Baptists  generally  hold 
to  the  view  that  the  Bible  itself,  especially  the  New  Testament,  is  the  only  proper 
compendium  for  faith  and  practice;  and  the  individual  conscience  and  intelligence, 
enlightened  by  the  Divine  Spirit,  is  the  proper  interpreter  thereof.  The  second 
reason  is  that  the  epoch-making  and  successful  battle  which  early  American  Bap- 
tists and  others  made  for  freedom  of  conscience  in  religion  and  worship  was  cal- 
culated to  reduce  the  amount  of  regimentation  of  thought  among  them% 

Baptists,  in  general,  believe  in  religious  freedom,  the  validity  and  inspiration  of 
the  Scriptures,  the  Lordship  of  Christ,  the  immortality  of  the  soul,  the  brotherhood 
of  man,  the  future  life,  the  need  of  redemption  from  sin,  and  the  ultimate  triumph 
of  the  Kingdom  of  God.  Various  groups  and  individuals  hold  to  other  items  of 
conviction,  which  are  not  so  universally  accepted,  and  by  many  are  regarded  as 


centuries,  Baptists  generally  have  stood  for  the  validity  and  value  of 
two  ordinances,  baptism  and  the  Lord's  Supper,  their  insistence  has  been  limited 
to  those  two;  and  their  views  as  to  the  vital  efficacy  of  those  ordinances  have 
gradually  shaded  into  a  conviction  of  their  value  as  an  aid  to  Christian  witness 
and  comfort,  rather  than  as  a  vital  necessity  for  Christian  character.  This  in- 
creasing liberalism  is  especially  characteristic  of  Northern  Baptists,  and  has  come 
about  more  or  less  through  the  increase  of  scholarship  and  the  association  and 
conference  in  the  north  of  many  more  diverse  groups  than  are  found  elsewhere  in 

So-calied  fundamentalism,  or  reactionary  and  conservative  bodies  of  thought 
revolving  around  the  Scriptures  and  theology,  is  found  somewhat  among  Northern 
Baptists,*  but  this  phenomenon  is  not  peculiar  to  them,  being  found  also  in  prac- 
tically all  evangelical  communions. 

WORK 

In  this  section  are  presented  the  operations  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Conven- 
tion through  its  agencies,  as  distinguished  from  the  general  scope  and  principles 
of  action  treated  in  foregoing  paragraphs.  .  . 

Mission  work  in  the  United  States  and  its  dependencies.  —  The  American  Baptist 
Publication  Society  was  organized  in  1824.  Its  operations  have  not  been  con- 
fined to  the  North,  but  its  offices  and  chief  property  are  in  Philadelphia,  and  it  is 
fully  recognized  as  a  unit  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  organization,  with 
which  it  is  in  full  cooperation.  It  has  several  departments:  Publishing,  mission- 
ary (including  Bible  distribution  and  evangelism),  religious  education,  vacation 
schools,  social  education,  and  youth  training.  The  missionary  department  em- 
ploys religious  education  directors,  State  missionary  pastors,  chapel  car  mission- 
aries and  automobile  colporteurs.  It  distributes  Bible  and  other  literature  in 
a  number  of  different  languages.  In  1936  the  American  Baptist  Publication 
Society  was  employing  127  agents;  it  had  organized  over  7,000  Sunday  schools 
and  over  2,000  churches  during  its  history  up  to  that  time;  churches  assisted  in 
part  numbered  many  thousands;  young  people's  societies  assisted  numbered  over 
5,000;  and  its  own  religious  literature  was  distributed,  representing  118  different 
publications  amounting  to  400,000,000  total  pages  for  the  year,  not  counting  the 
output  of  miscellaneous  literature  by  many  publishers,  through  the  various  book 


NORTHERN   BAPTIST   CONVENTION  111 

stores  maintained  by  the  society  in  strategic  locations  throughout  the  United 
States.  The  income  of  the  society  from  all  sources  was  $1,086,854,  and  the  total 
assets  were  $4,753,489. 

The  American  Baptist  Home  Mission  Society  was  organized  in  1832.  It 
employs  general  missionaries  and  pastors  among  people  of  both  English  and 
foreign  tongues,  in  the  United  States,  Mexico,  Puerto  Rico,  and  Cuba;  it  aids 
city  missions;  builds  meeting  houses;  maintains  schools  for  Negroes  and  Indians; 
and  promotes  evangelism  and  various  phases  of  social  service. 

In  1936,  this  society  employed  a  staff  and  agents  in  the  field  to  the  number  of 
502,  including  missionary  teachers.  There  were  821  churches  aided  (including 
Latin  and  North  America) ;  the  churches  assisted  in  the  Church  Edifice  Depart- 
ment from  1920-36  numbered  295  and  to  the  extent  of  $1,074,350;  the  total 
income  of  this  society  from  all  sources  was  $501,570  for  the  year,  and  the  total 
assets  were  $17,240,230. 

The  Woman's  American  Baptist  Home  Mission  Society  was  organized  origi- 
nally in  1877,  and  was  consolidated  in  1909  with  the  Women's  Baptist  Home 
Mission  Society  of  Michigan,  with  headquarters  in  Chicago.  Its  object,  primarily, 
is  the  employment  of  women  missionaries  to  work  chiefly  among  peoples  using 
foreign  languages,  and  among  Negroes  and  Indians;  and  the  maintenance  of 
training  schools  for  missionary  workers.  This  society  employed  179  missionaries 
and  22  native  teachers  and  had  14  nurses  in  training  in  1936.  Of  the  mission- 
aries, 18  were  assigned,  1  each,  to  the  same  number  of  foreign  language  churches. 
Christian  centers  were  maintained  in  cities  to  the  number  of  38,  in  cooperat  ion 
with  the  American  Baptist  Home  Mission  Society,  State  conventions,  or  city 
mission  societies.  Five  Indian  mission  stations  were  maintained.  The  total 
income  was  $186,828.  The  total  assets  were  $3,193,202. 

Mission  work  in  foreign  countries. — The  American  Baptist  Foreign  Mission 
Society  was  organized  in  Philadelphia  in  1814,  as  the  "General  Missionary  Con- 
vention of  the  Baptist  Denomination  in  the  United  States  of  America  for  Foreign 
Missions."  In  1846  the  name  was  changed  to  the  "American  Baptist  Mission 
Union,"  and  again  in  1910  the  name  was  changed  to  "American  Baptist  Foreign 
Mission  Society." 

The  fields  in  which  this  society  operates  in  the  Far  East  are  India  (including 
Burma  and  Assam),  China,  Japan,  Africa,  and  the  Philippines.  In  Europe 
work  is  carried  on  in  Sweden,  Germany,  France,  Belgium,  Spain,  Finland,  Den- 
mark, and  Norway  (and  formerly  in  Russia);  but  this  work  is  confined  almost 
entirely  to  assistance  in  the  training  of  ministers  and  in  the  meeting  of  the  ex- 
penses of  local  churches.  American  missionaries  are  not  sent  to  these  countries 
and  the  work  there  is  on  an  entirely  different  basis  from  that  in  Asia  and  Africa. 

The  statistics  for  this  society  for  1935-36  included  the  following:  Countries  in 
which  work  was  projected,  10  (not  including  Europe);  resident  missionaries,  545; 
stations  occupied,  122;  American  missionaries,  545;  native  workers,  10,039; 
churches  assisted  in  foreign  lands,  916;  schools  maintained  in  foreign  lands,  4,326 
(of  which  2,361  were  self-supporting);  hospitals  and  dispensaries,  95,  treating 
25,908  in-patients  and  287,203  out-patients  (a  total  of  313,111);  total  income 
derived  from  all  sources  was  $1,097,848.  Total  assets  were  $10,249,702. 

This  society  cooperates  with  the  Baptists  in  nine  European  countries.  This  work 
is  represented  by  2,034  workers,  ordained  and  unprdained;  647  organized  churches, 
with  110,949  members;  1,444  Sunday  schools,  with  58,335  members;  7  theological 
seminaries,  with  85  students.  The  amount  of  money  raised  by  Baptists  in  these 
lands  was  $242,127  in  Europe  and  $274,806  in  the  10  mission  fields  in  other  lands. 
The  society  maintains  training  schools  for  native  workers,  and  cooperates  with 
other  Baptist  national  organizations,  both  American  and  European. 

The  Woman's  American  Baptist  Foreign  Mission  Society  is  in  close  cooperation 
with  the  general  foreign  society.  This  organization  is  a  continuation  of  the  two 
former  societies,  the  Woman's  American  Foreign  Mission  Society  and  the  Woman's 
Baptist  Foreign  Mission  Society  of  the  West.  The  earlier  societies  were  organ- 
ized in  1871  and  their  consolidation  occurred  in  1914. 

The  work  of  this  society  is  a  broad  parallel  of  that  of  the  general  society,  but 
with  special  emphasis  upon  the  work  among  girls  and  women  in  the  foreign- 
mission  stations,  in  the  schools  and  colleges,  and  in  the  area  of  medical  and  social 
work  in  foreign  countries.  This  society  is  highly  organized  in  this  country,  every 
district,  State,  and  church  being  represented  in  or  contacted  by  the  official  circle. 
Large  amounts  of  literature  are  distributed  and  many  interesting  devices  for  the 
raising  of  money  in  small  amounts  from  individuals  are  constantly  originated. 

For  1936  the  society  employed  199  missionaries  in  educational,  medical  (nurses 


112  CENSUS    OE    RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

and  physicians),  and  social  work  in  10  countries,  at  Sl^definite  stations.  The 
income  of  the  society  from  all  sources  was  $334,345,  and  the  total  assets  amounted 
to  $2,544,573. 

Affiliated  missionary  organizations. — Large  and  influential  organizations 
affiliated  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  are  the  State  Baptist  conventions 
in  30  States,  including  special  groups  in  the  District  of  Columbia,  Missouri, 
Oklahoma,  and  Puerto  Rico;  and  16  standard  city-mission  societies,  operating 
among  foreign-speaking  peoples,  the  under-privileged,  and  the  humbler  classes  of 
population  generally,  and  maintaining  church  services,  educational  and  social 
service  centers,  hospitalization,  Americanization,  etc. 

Education  work. — The  general  education  work  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Conven- 
tion is  under  the  supervision  and  direction  of  the  Board  of  Education,  a  corpora- 
tion organized  by  the  convention  in  1920  to  succeed  the  American  Baptist  Edu- 
cation Society,  which  had  functioned  since  1888.  This  board  assists  Baptist 
secondary  schools  and  colleges  financially,  and  in  some  cases  exercises  direct 
control  of  them.  In  non-Baptist  institutions,  and  in  State  universities  to  some 
extent,  the  board  supervises  Baptist  religious  interests  as  here  indicated. 

There  are  19  colleges,  10  junior  colleges,  and  11  secondary  schools,  caring  for 
white  pupils,  in  which  this  board  has  some  interest  or  control.  These  institutions 
have  2,585  teachers  and  30,236  pupils,  as  of  1936.  They  have  real  property 
amounting  to  $102,249,601  and  endowments  of  $152,488,515.  There  are  also  seven 
schools  for  Negroes  in  the  Southern  States  maintained  in  whole  or  in  part  by 
agencies  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention,  such  as  the  American  Baptist  Home 
Mission  Society,  in  which  the  Board  of  Education  has  a  hand.  The  total  enroll- 
ment of  these  schools  in  1936  was  128  teachers  and  2,200  students.  The  property 
of  these  schools  is  valued  at  $2,579,839  and  the  endowments  amount  to  $1,954,923. 
The  Convention  maintains  1  school  for  Indians  in  the  United  States  at  Bacone, 
Okla.,  with  18  teachers  and  260  students;  and  a  property  worth  $365,000,  with 
an  endowment  of  $233,000.  The  Convention  also  cares  for  some  schools  among 
the  foreign-language  peoples  of  the  United  States,  Cuba,  Puerto  Rico,  Haiti, 
Mexico,  and  Nicaragua.  In  the  United  States,  there  are  6  missionary  and 
religious  work  training  schools  with  46  teachers,  177  students;  property  valued 
at  §931,465  and  endowments  of  $219,490.  In  addition  to  the  foregoing,  there 
are  10  theological  seminaries  with  137  teachers,  1,512  students;  property  valued 
at  $5,594,144,  and  endowments  aggregating  $13,191,371. 

The  Board  of  Education  also  maintains  student  pastors  and  similar  agencies  in 
various  colleges;  and  it  conducts  work  for  youth  of  both  sexes  through  its  mission- 
ary education  department,  which  is  popularly  known  under  the  names  of  World 
Wide  Guild,  Royal  Ambassadors,  and  Crusaders.  The  work  of  this  department 
also  has  a  very  wide  scope  among  the  adults  of  the  churches  and  Sunday  schools. 

Closely  allied  with  the  work  of  the  educational  agencies  of  the  Northern  Baptist 
Convention  is  the  self-directed  work  of  the  Baptist  Young  People's  Union  of 
America,  a  fraternal  organization  for  the  young  people's  societies  of  the  Baptist 
churches.  In  this  organization  are  approximately  6,000  young  people's  unions, 
with  at  least  150,000  members,  and  a  considerable  number  of  Christian  Endeavor 
Societies  closely  affiliated  with  the  major  Baptist  Union. 

Philanthropic  enterprises. — While  vast  areas  of  philanthropic  work  are  covered 
by  the  various  missionary  societies  of  the  denomination,  including  medical 
missions  and  relief  work,  the  outstanding  philanthropic  endeavor  of  the  denomi- 
nation is  expressed  in  the  splendid  outreach  of  the  Ministers  and  Missionaries 
Benefit  Board,  which  is  the  organization  for  pensions  and  relief  among  ministers, 
missionaries,  their  widows  and  dependent  children,  of  the  Northern  Baptist 
Convention.  This  incorporated  board  was  23  years  of  age  in  1936  and,  beginning 
its  work  with  only  $250,000,  at  its  twenty-third  anniversary  had  assets  valued  at 
$21,000,000,  representing  pension,  general,  permanent,  and  annuity  funds.  In 
this  year,  the  board  had  2,839  members  in  its  pension  plan,  of  whom  33  percent 
were  already  drawing  pensions  amounting  to  approximately  $350,000;  and  other 
beneficiaries,  approximately  1,400,  to  whom,  as  individuals,  grants  were  made  in 
extreme  need  for  personal  or  family  use.  This  board  also  receives  annuity  gifts 
and  issues  binding  contracts  for  the  same.  During  its  existence  the  board  has 
distributed  in  pensions  and  relief  approximately  $8,000,000. 

Another  philanthropic  enterprise  of  the  denomination  is  represented  by  the 
Association  of  Baptist  Homes  and  Hospitals.  The  association  is  in  its  infancy, 
but  already  promises  great  usefulness.  Baptist  independent  hospitals,  and  homes 
for  the  aged  and  for  orphans,  which  have  performed  important  service  to  a 
Baptist  constituency,  are  now  leagued  together  for  enlarged  scope  and  increased 
resources.  At  present  there  are  6  hospitals,  20  homes  for  the  aged,  and  16 


NORTHERN   BAPTIST   CONVENTION  113 

orphanages,  representing  an  average  of  13,447  patients  in  the  hospitals,  and  of 
1,945  residents  in  the  homes.  The  value  of  the  property  of  these  institutions  is 
$6,281,263,  and  their  endowments  amount  to  $3,846,411. 

Publication  agencies  and  projects. — The  publication  interests  of  the  North- 
ern Baptists  are  varied  and  extensive.  The  American  Baptist  Publication 
Society  publishes  several  score  of  religious  books  a  year,  besides  "The  Annual'5 
(reports)  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  and  "The  American  Baptist  Year- 
Book"  (statistics).  This  society  also  issues  regularly  118  Sunday  school  and 
other  periodicals.  The  society  maintains  branches  and  stores  in  various  cities  of 
the  United  States  and  Canada.  In  addition  to  this  publication  society,  the  Ger- 
man Baptist  Publication  Society,  of  Cleveland,  Ohio,  and  the  Swedish  Baptist 
Publication  Society,  of  Chicago,  111.,  produce  a  number  of  publications;  and  some 
publication  work  is  carried  on  by  the  Hungarian,  Roumanian,  Polish,  Italian, 
French,  and  Slovak  Baptist  organizations. 

The  various  missionary  societies  and  the  Council  on  Finance  and  Promotion 
print  and  distribute  a  large  array  of  books,  leaflets,  and  pamphlets  every  year, 
which  are  distributed  through  the  literature  department  of  the  Board  of  Educa- 
tion and,  also,  directly  from  the  societies. 

The  principal  denominational  magazines  (weekly,  monthly,  and  quarterly) 
in  English  are  The  Watchman-Examiner,  Missions,  The  Ministry,  and  The 
Baptist  Minister;  and  the  foreign-speaking  conventions  also  publish  some  40 
periodicals  of  their  own.  The  State  conventions  publish  their  own  State  bulletins 
monthly,  and  the  Council  on  Finance  and  Promotion  provides  all  denominational 
leaders  with  a  monthly  news  bulletin  of  leading  denominational  items. 

Pageantry  and  religious  drama  are  more  and  more  engaging  the  attention  of 
players'  guilds  in  the  churches,  with  the  result  that  denominational  authorship 
is  on  the  increase.  The  visualization  department  of  the  Council  on  Finance  and 
Promotion,  by  stereopticon,  motion  pictures,  and  crayon  talks  has  developed  a 
widespread  influence  and  business.  There  have  been  years  and  decades  when  the 
figures  were  higher  or  ;lower  according  to  circumstances  than  in  1936.  All  in 
all,  however,  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention  has  had  a  steady  growth  in  mem- 
bers, finances,  and  influence. 


SOUTHERN  BAPTIST  CONVENTION 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention  for  the  year 
1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures 
between  urban  and  rural  territory.  The  statistics  for  the  Southern  Baptist 
Convention  are  incomplete,  due  to  the  failure  of  the  pastor  or  clerk  of  the  church 
to  furnish  a  report  to  this  Bureau  after  repeated  requests.  The  data  presented 
here  represent  a  compilation  of  the  reports  received.* 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  comprises  those  who  have  been  received 
into  the  local  churches  upon  voluntary  confession  of  faith  in  the  Lord  Jesus 
Christ  and  a  willingness  to  carry  out  His  will,  and  baptism  by  immersion. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMAEY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

*  *  13,  815 

*  2,  700,  155 
195 

1,  071,  Oil 
1,437,885 
191,  259 

74  5 

135,  152 
2,  181,  625 
383,  378 
5.8 

12,  742 
12,  370 
$117,  766,  295 
$113,  504,  370 

$4,  261,  925 
$9,  520 
1,740 
$14,  428,  046 
7,627 

2,378 
2,320 
$7,986,539 

13,  521 
$19,630,844 
$6,  415,  956 
$1,  492,  748 
$1,  667,  276 

$2,  104,  500 

$3,685,265 
$478,  158 
$314,  074 
$312,  373 
$2,026,624 
$1,  133,  870 
$1,452 

12,  161 
192,770 
1,664,105 

1,843 

1,  023,  971 
556 

382,  558 
537,  207 
104,206 
71.2 

68,  826 
;        798,440 
156,  705 
:              7.9 

1,742 
1,702 
$76,  707,  132 
$74,  139,  022 

$2,  568,  110 
$45,  069 
815 
$12,  373,  270 
658 

750 
744 
$4,321,833 

1,832 
$11,  858,  578 
$2,964,524 
$1,078,800 
$873,  203 

$1,  585,  611 

$2,  651,  721 
$226,  187 
$182,  536 
$199,  848 
$1,  415,  699 
$680,449 
$6,473 

1,753 
73,  822 
720.  271 

11,972 

1,  676,  184 
140 

688,453 
900,  678 
87,  053 
76  4 

66,  326 
1,  383,  185 
226,  673 
4.6 

„  11,000 

10,  668 
$41,  059,  163 
339,  365,  348 

$1,  693,  815 
$3,  849 
925 
$2,  054,  776 
6,969 

1,628 
1,576 
$3,  664,  706 

11,  689 
$7,  772,  266 
$3;  451,  432 
.  $413,948 
$794,073 

$518,889 

$1,  033,  544 
$251,  971 
$131,  538 
$112,  525 
$610,  925 
$453,  421 
$665 

10,  408 
118,  948 
943.  834 

13.3 
37.9 

86.7 
62.1 

Members,  number  

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male      

35.7 
37  4 

54.5 

64.3 
62.6 
44.5 

Female 

Sex  not  reported  

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years  _. 

50.9 
36  6 
40.9 

49.1 
63.4 
59.1 

13  years  and  over.  . 

Age  not  reported  _ 

Percent  under  13  years  2  

Clmrch  edifices,  number  

13.7 
13.8 
65.1 
65.3 

60.3 

86  3 
86  2 
34.9 
34.7 

39.7 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  

Constructed  prior  to  1936  „  _ 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in 
1936-  

Average  value  per  church 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

46.8 
85  8 
8.6 

31.5 
32.1 
54.1 

13.5 
60.4 
46.2 
72.3 
52.4 

75.3 

72.0 
47.3 
58.1 
64.0 
69.9 
60.0 

63.2 
14  2 
91.4 

68.5 
67.9 
45.9 

86.5 
39.6 
53.8 
27.7 
47.6 

24.7 

28  0 
52.7 
41.9 
36.0 
30.1 
40.0 

Amount  reported. 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Parsonages,  number  ._ 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Amount  reported  

Pastors'  salaries  

All  other  salaries  _ 

Repairs  and  improvements  

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding 
interest 

All  other  current  expenses,  including 
interest 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.. 
Home  missions  ... 

Foreign  missions  

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution. 
All  other  purposes  

Average  expenditure  per  church  

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  

14.4 
38.3 
43.3 

85.6 
61.7 
56.7 

Officers  and  teachers,. 

Scholars..  _  .... 

*  The  Southern  Baptist  Handbook  for  1937  shows  24,671  churches  and  4,482,315  members  for  1936. 

i  Exclusive  of  statistics  for  30  churches  belonging  to  the  Columbia  Association— 24  in  the  District  of  Colum- 
bia and  6  in  the  State  of  Maryland—which  are  reported  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported, 

114 


SOUTHERN    BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


115 


TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR   CHURCHES  IN   URBAN  AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL 

Urban 

Eural 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

1,288 
16,  194 
122,  893 

297 
1,909 
15,  606 

80 
872 
8,924 

457 
9,074 
69,  121 

54 
513 
5,356 

16 
422 
5,312 

831 

7,120 
53,  772 

243 

1,396 
10,250 

64 
450 
3,612 

35  5 
56.0 
56.2 

18.2 
26.9 
34.3 

a* 

59.5 

64.5 
44.0 
43.8 

81.8 
73.1 
65.7 

(?) 
51.6 
40.5 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars                                                     

Weekday  religious  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

Parochial  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  „_  ... 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars  _  -  

3  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention 
for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  STJMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

19161 

19061 

Churches  (local  organizations)  ,  nnmT)6r 

a  13,  815 

23,  374 

23,  580 

21,  075 

Increase  3  over  preceding  census: 
Number  

-9,559 

—206 

2,505 

11    Q 

Percent  

—40.9 
2,  700,  155 

3,  524,  378 

2,  708,  870 

2,  009,  471 

Increase  3  over  preceding  census: 
Number  — 

-824,223 

815,  508 

699,  399 

0/4     O 

Percent  —  
Average  membership  ptir  church 

—23.4 
195 

151 

115 

95 

Church  edifices,  number              

12,  742 

21,  401 

19,  770 

18,  878 

"Value    TvujtVfopr  r^po^ti^g                     -  -  

12,370 

21,  128 

19,  268 

18,  672 

Amount  reported 

$117,  766,  295 

$173,  456,  965 

$58,348,373 

$34,  723,  882 

Average  value  per  church                  

$9,520 

$8,210 

$3,028 

$1,  860 

1,740 

2,730 

1,638 

1,215 

Amount  reported                     -    

$14,428,046 

$22,986,982 

$3,  153,  158 

$1,  239,  022 

2  378 

Value—  number  reporting                    -  -  

2,320 

3,429 

1,820 

1,271 

$7,  986,  539 

$15,  185,  725 

$4,471,683 

$2,  493,  091 

Expenditures  : 

Churches  reporting,  number  

13,  521 

22,338 

21,  078 

<C"i  K  f)cq   743 

Amount  reported  -  

$19,  630,  844 
$6,415,956 

$1,  492,  748 

Repairs  and  improvements  

$1,  667,  276 

Payment  on  churcli  debt,  excluding  in- 

$2,104,500 

$32,  886,  565 

All  other  current  expenses,  including 

$3,685,265 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc. 
Home  missions..  - 

$478,  158 
$314,  074 

1       d>n   7R1    fil  K 

$3  968  970 

Foreign  missions  r— 
To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 
All  other  purposes  

$2,  026,  624 
$1,133,870 

$256,383 

$125,  704 

Average  expenditure  per  church  

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number            -  -  

$1,452 
12,  161 

$1,921 
19,882 

$715 
17,555 

14,371 

Officers  and  teachers            -  

192,  770 

229,848 

160,  171 

Scholars  

1,  664,  105 

2,  345,  630 

1,  665,  996 

~"          •         ^*T^P>1 

Qlfinnrlftr  the] 

name  of  Amer- 

i  Statistics  for  lyio  ana  lyuo  inciuae  ngures  iur  mo  i^ua.vuw  vi&u,^*.*^  »~~~ — 

s  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 
275318 — 41 9 


116 


CEN'S'IJS'  OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Southern 
Baptist  Convention  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number 
and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or 
rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table 

4  gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the 
four  census  years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified 
as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."    Table  5  shows  the 
value  of  churches  and  parsonages  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices  for 
1936.     Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately 
current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc.    In  order  to  avoid  disclosing 
the  financial  statistics  of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables 

5  and  6  is  limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value 
and  expenditures. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  in  the  Southern 
Baptist  Convention,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States 
in  the  preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and 
debt  on  church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 

TABLE  3. — NTJMBBK  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHXJECHES  INT  URBAN*  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF  CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

Total 

Urban 

Eural 

Total 

Urban 

Rural 

United  States 

113,815 

1,843 

11,972 

2,700,155 

1,023,971 

1,876,184 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Pennsylvania 

1 

2 
3 

371 
1 

1,024 
6 

64 
783 
12 
1,479 
673 
1,255 
440 

1,225 
1,194 
1,267 
860 

479 
444 
542 
1,606 

1 
75 
8 

1 

1 
2 
302 

50 

214 
373 
49,  730 
256 

165,419 
933 

11,890 
177,  196 
3,072 
289,  746 
159,  887 
265,630 
87,  006 

229,  216 
226,  896 
212,  855 
150,  000 

78,825 
87,926 
132,407 
360,421 

42 
8,687 
1,478 

50 

140 
157 
30,  561 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

1 
1 

69 
1 

121 
3 

31 
95 
5 
160 
79 
172 
100 

117 
157 
123 
81 

61 
65 
104 
278 

1 
14 
4 

74 
216 
19,  169 
256 

63,  163 
605 

9,033 
68,  127 
2,585 
78,050 
46,  915 
102,  248 
47,  287 

70,  017 
83,303 
65,491 
40,  214 

33,  829 
31,913 

78,  511 
178,  089 

42 
3,955 
879 

Indiana,.,  

Illinois  

Michigan 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri  .-  . 

903 
3 

33 
688 
7 
1,319 
594 
1,083 
340 

1,108 
1,037 
1,144 
779 

418 
379 
438 
1,328 

102,  256 
328 

2,857 
109,069 
487 
211,  696 
112,  972 
163,  382 
39,  719 

159,  199 
143,  593 
147,  364 
109,  786 

44,  996 
56,  013 
53,  896 
182,  332 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Maryland  

Virginia-  .... 

West  Virginia-. 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina  

Georgia  

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Kentucky  

Tennessee  .,    .. 

Alabama 

Mississippi  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana  ... 

Oklahoma 

Texas     

MOUNTAIN: 
Colorado  _ 

New  Mexico  

61 
4 

4,732 
599 

Arizona  

i  Exclusive  of  statistics  for  30  churches  belonging  to  the  Columbia  Association— 24  in  the  District  of 
Columbia  and  6  in  the  State  of  Maryland—which  are  reported  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention, 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


117 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 — 
Continued 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

Male 

Female 

Sex  not 
reported 

Males 
per  100 
females  2 

Cnurches 
reporting 

Officers 
and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States  

,  071,  Oil 

,4S7,885 

191,259 

-       .-— 

74.5 

12,  161 

192,770 

1,684,105 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Pennsylvania 

20 

91 
163 
17,  966 
105 

62,  592 
350 

4,083 

74,  411 
1,185 
116,  780 
68,  452 
104,  187 
33,  134 

88,490 
91,  153 
82,  864 
62,  237 

31,  732 
35,  432 

48,549 
142,  970 

17 
3,470 
578 

30 

123 

210 
25,546 
151 

86,  579 
583 

6,044 
95,  651 
1,887 
155,  199 
86,237 
139,  277 
46,  127 

122,  419 
123,  140 
112,  585 
77,  741 

43,  710 
45,  576 
69,  270 
193,  709 

25 
5,166 
900 

1 

2 
3 

341 

1 

907 
5 

62 
746 
9 
1,399 
637 
1,003 
377 

1,023 
1,094 
1,067 
667 

425 
393 
497 
1,428 

1 
61 
7 

11 

30 
27 

4,558 
29 

14,191 
82 

1,441 
13,749 
223 
22,  430 
10,706 
14,994 
6,974 

14,099 
15,  012 
14,020 
7,942 

6,438 
5,475 
10,947 
28,282 

11 
960 
139 

68 

343 
399 
32,979 
190 

105,461 

585 

9,524 
124,  386 
2,540 
217,339 
109,  746 
132,923 
58,864 

128,131 
133,021 
112,736 
64,434 

49,810 
46,  117 
89,199 
237,970 

73 
6,373 
894 

EAST  NOBTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio                        

74  0 
77.6 
70.3 
69  5 

72.3 
60.0 

67.6 
77.8 
62.8 
75.2 
79.4 
74.8 
71.8 

72.3 

74.0 
73  6 
80.1 

72.6 
77.7 
70.1 
73.8 

Indi&na 

Illinois         -  

6,218 

Michigan 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri 

16,  248 

TCan^?^ 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC. 
Maryland 

1,763 
7,134 

Virginia 

"YVost  Virsinia 

17,  767 
5,198 
22,  166 

7,745 

18,307 
12,  603 
17,406 
10,022 

3,383 

6,918 
14,  588 
23,  742 

South  Carolina 

Georgia                   

Florida    

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky   _„  »  -  

Tennessee                

Alabama      _    

Mississippi              

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana    -  

Oklahoma                 -  

Texas          

MOtTNTAIN: 

Colorado 

New  Mexico           

51 

•   67.2 
64.2 

a  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


118 


GENS-US'   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926,  or  1916] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

STATE 

NUMBER'OF  CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

1936 

1936 

19161 

19061 

1936 

1936 

United  States  _. 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL; 
Indiana  

2  13,  815 

a 

371 

1,024 
6 

64 

23,  374 

6 

546 

1,764 
5 

95 
2 
1,139 
13 
2,321 
1,170 
2,468 
719 

1,919 
1,845 
2,083 
1,515 

860 
766 
961 
3,038 

127 
10 

2 

23,580 

21,  075 

2,  700,  155 

8,  524,  378 

373 

49,  730 

165,  419 
933 

11,  890 

473 
59,  382 

221,  690 
532 

17,  911 
1,981 
223,  270 
3,563 
385,  940 
217,  104 
400,  560 
103,  135 

305,  582 
271,  921 
271,  992 
211,370 

103,  346 
117,  220 
131,  139 
465,274 

9,570 
1,301 

122 

Illinois 

604 
1,905 

WEST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri  ...  

1,894 
1 

71 

[Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Maryland    

84 
5 
1,055 
11 
2,137 
1,093 
2,408 
683 

1,835 
1,718 
1,993 
1,436 

1,409 
602 
1,108 
3,358 

135 

District  of  Columbia 

Virginia 

783 
12 
1,479 
673 
1,255 
440 

1,225 
1,194 
1,267 
860 

479 
444 
542 
1,606 

75 
8 

35 

1,028 
11 
1,837 
979 
2,157 
548 

1,701 
1,615 
1,907 
1,346 

1,415 
609 
854 
3,098 

4 

177,  196 
3,072 
289,  746 
159,  887 
265,  630 
87,006 

229,216 
226,896 
212,855 
150,  000 

78,  825 
87,  926 
132,407 
360,421 

8,687 
1,478 

562 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  

South  Carolina 

Georgia  

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee    .. 

Alabama..  

Mississippi  .. 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana  _  ,.  ,  .         ,,_,„. 

Oklahoma. 

Texas  

MOUNTAIN: 
New  Mexico  

Arizona 

Other  States 

1 

1  Statistics  for  1916  and  1906  include  figures  for  the  churches  organized  since  191 6  under  the  name  of  American 
Baptist  Association. 

2  Exclusive  of  statistics  for  30  churches  belonging  to  the  Columbia  Association— -24  in  the  District  of  Co 
lumbia  and  6  in  the  State  ol  Maryland — which  are  reported  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 

s  Includes:  Pennsylvania,  1;  Ohio,  2;  Michigan,  1;  and  Colorado,  1. 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


119 


.  —  NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES  —  Continued 


TABLE 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936,  1926,  or  1916] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS— 

continued 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

19161 

1906  ^ 

Under  13 
years 

13  years 
and  over 

Age  not 
reported 

Percent 
under  13  * 

United  States 

2,  708,  870 

2,  009,  471 

135,  152 

2,  181,  625 

367 
38,  855 

136,  843 
889 

9,744 

383,  378 

5.8 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Indiana         

6 
1,300 

6,926 
44 

423 

1.6 
3.2 

4.8 

4.7 

4.2 

Illinois 

62,  822 
210,  889 

9,575 
21,650 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri        __    _ 

176,208 
17 

11,232 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Maryland      .-  .- 

14,  650 
2,767 
170,  151 
2,449 
279,  112 
158,  151 
305,  055 
57,  732 

252,  554 
202,  867 
207,  603 
153,  497 

113,  192 
66,298 
87,028 
355,  251 

6,721 

1,723 

District  of  Columbia  
Virginia..  

136,062 
1,672 
202,  798 
118,  360 
232,  688 
34,  646 

211,  552 
159,  838 
162,  445 
123,  357 

91,  631 
49,  620 
49,  978 
247,  306 

61 

8,187 
173 
13.  189 
7,063 
9,218 
4,872 

8,135 
9,284 
8,414 
7,027 

4,422 
5,710 
12,  303 
27,468 

887 
90 

11 

141,  494 
2,274 
236,  958 
134,  579 
212,  750 
72,  605 

186,  417 
183,281 
174,  201 
115,890 

65,  738 
71,  801 
98,  367 
289,216 

7,539 
1,316 

501 

27,  515 
625 
39,  599 
18,245 
43,  662 
9,529 

34,664 
34,331 
30,240 
27,083 

8,665 
10,  415 
21,  737 
43,  737 

261 
72 

50 

5.5 
7.1 
5.3 
5  0 
4.2 
6.3 

4.2 

4.8 
4.6 
5.7 

6.3 

7.4 
11.1 
8.7 

10.5 
6.4 

2.1 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  

South  Carolina 

Georgia  

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee  

Alabama 

Mississippi  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas.    _  - 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas  ~ 

MOUNTAIN: 
New  Mexico 

Arizona 

Other  States 

81 

i  Statistics  for  1916  and  1906  include  figures  for  the  churches  organized  since  1916  under  the  name  of 
American  Baptist  Association. 
4  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


120 


OF'  RELIGIOUS  BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OP  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF 
PARSONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

U3,815 

3 

371 

1,024 
6 

64 
783 
12 
1,479 
673 
1,255 
440 

1,225 
1,194 
1,267 
860 

479 
444 
542 
1.606 

75 
8 

5 

12,742 

3 

356 

960 
6 

63 

764 
11 
1,394 
638 
1,188 
416 

1,139 
1,071 
1,157 
801 

407 
418 
459 
1,434 

47 
6 

4 

12,370 

$117,766,285 

1,740 

$14,  428,  046 

2,320 

$7,  986,  539 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Indiana..- 

3 

348 

923 
6 

62 
744 
11 
1,359 
617 
1,168 
406 

1,135 
1,041 
1,121 
771 

399 
399 
445 
1,375 

47 
6 

34 

5,700 
1,  695,  480 

8,  615,  303 
42,  900 

1,  648,  875 
11,231,395 
256,  500 
12,  790,  370 
6,  263,  642 
11,  281,  731 
4,988,974 

9,  547,  685 
8,619,208 
7,  435,  569 
4,831,228 

3,  120,  759 
2,572,170 
5,  251,  573 
17,  097,  453 

376,480 
78,500 

14,800 

1 

41 

109 
2 

29 
133 
2 

186 
65 
101 
104 

123 
136 

114 
64 

68 
52 
123 
269 

14 
4 

2,100 
152,  913 

832,  273 

150 

213,  499 
1,632,468 
21,  939 
1,  500,  843 
545,  575 
945,  461 
899,  685 

992,  340 
1,  212,  335 
859,  359 
639,  784 

344,058 
193,745 
764,  809 
2,  603,  857 

45,  453 
25,400 

IlMnois  

39 
119 

100,  100 
342,  928 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri.                 .    ... 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Maryland- 

29 
287 
4 
222 
136 
126 
94 

120 
115 
131 
130 

74 
78 
173 
419 

23 
3 

124,  000 
1,  126,  526 
30,  000 
923,908 
564,450 
516,  550 
417,  493 

664,  250 
426,  450 
499,000 
414,  950 

201,941 
212,463 
347,  990 
1,  134,  240 

\   239,300 

Virginia  

West  Virrinia  

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina 

Georsia-    ..  _ 

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  __ 

Tennessee 

AJahflma 

Mississippi               .  . 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

Louisiana. 

Oklahoma.         _. 

Texas  

MOUNTAIN: 
New  Mexico 

Arizona.  . 

Other  States  

1  Exclusive  of  statistics  for  30  churches  belonging  to  the  Columbia  Association— 24  in  the  District  of  Colum- 
bia and  6  in  the  State  of  Maryland— which  are  reported  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 

2  Amount  for  Arizona  combined  with  figures  for  New  Mexico,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any 
individual  church. 

3  Includes:  Pennsylvania,  1;  Ohio,  2;  and  Michigan,  1. 


SOUTHERN    BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


121 


TABLE  6. — CHUKCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting 


rnA4.Q'j 

E] 

STENDITURE 

S 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

number 
of 
churches 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Eepairs 
and 
improve- 
ments 

United  States 

1  13  815 

13  521 

$19  630  844 

$6  415  956 

$1  492  748 

$1  867  276 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Indiana 

3 

3 

3  291 

1  150 

203 

203 

Illinois         .  .       -_  _  -  --•  

371 

357 

286  534 

110  973 

18  207 

20  960 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri      _-            -  

1,024 

996 

1,  200,  811 

445  409 

113  179 

82  279 

Kansas 

6 

5 

8  780 

3  680 

761 

204 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Maryland  TT  „ 

64 

6)2 

185,  008 

64,  402 

11,  379 

9  484 

Virginia 

783 

777 

1,  783,  7S1 

514,  471 

130  263 

120  448 

West  Virginia  

12 

11 

48,  591 

12,443 

3,509 

836 

North  Carolina 

1,479 

1,465 

1,  995,  991 

640  765 

129,  914 

191  113 

South  Carolina  

673 

669 

1,  127,  821 

393,  487 

66,  256 

129,  882 

Georgia 

1,255 

1,218 

1,  580,  553 

493,  898 

115,  650 

218  213 

Florida 

440 

435 

877  235 

286,  662 

60  464 

88  491 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  _  

1,225 

1,190 

1,  471,  564 

494,  667 

115,  473 

134,  676 

Tennessee 

1,194 

1,161 

1,  590,  819 

468,  753 

122,  192 

106  923 

Alabama  _  

1,267 

1,24S 

1,  019,  099 

365,  493 

72,535 

85,507 

Mississippi 

860 

845 

804,428 

299,345 

52,  430 

64  597 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

479 

464 

578,  450 

198,  100 

43,  443 

38,  596 

Louisiana  

444 

439 

596,  791 

206,  286 

49,  909 

39,  486 

Oklahoma       -                  ._    __ 

542 

522 

1,  137,  364 

353,  193 

94,  318 

121,  876 

Texas 

1,606 

1,578 

3,  203,  622 

1,  008,  366 

286,  695 

203,  963 

MOUNTAIN: 
New  Mexico 

75 

68 

107,  252 

43,  773 

4,575 

8,654 

Arizona  -  -  ~. 

8 

8 

17,  318 

7,007 

1,113 

505 

Other  States 

5 

*5 

5,791 

3,633 

280 

380 

*  Exclusive  of  statistics  for  30  churches  belonging  to  the  Columbia  Association— 24  in  the  District  of  Colum- 
bia and  6  in  the  State  of  Maryland— which  are  reported  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 
2  Includes:  Pennsylvania,  1;  Ohio,  2;  Michigan,  1;  and  Colorado,  1. 


122 


CENSUS1   OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIEiS,    1936 


TABLE  €. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 — Continued 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


EXPEND] 

TURES—  CO 

ntinued 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

Payment 
on  church 
debt, 
excluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local 
relief 
and 
charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  general 
head- 
quarters 

AM  other 
purposes 

TTaited  States 

$2  104  500 

$8,  685,  285 

$478,  158 

S314,  074 

S812,  373 

82,  026,  624 

$1,  133,  870 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Indiana  

433 

934 

5 

26 

19 

196 

122 

Illinois  

36,  628 

46,  440 

8,711 

4,397 

3,001 

20,  842 

16,  375 

WEST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri  -          -  

71,  039 

284,  072 

19,  014 

24,  869 

17,  475 

77,  338 

66,  137 

Kansas             .  - 

1,320 

1,697 

99 

4 

786 

229 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Maryland 

13  300 

45,  337 

3,280 

1,184 

2,479 

19,  232 

14,  931 

Virginia 

271  411 

331  491 

39  453 

17,  975 

21,  333 

276,  123 

60  763 

West  Virginia  

6,996 

9,900 

556 

50 

206 

6,998 

7,197 

North.  Carolina 

199  260 

360  842 

69  441 

26,  090 

37,  211 

205  983 

135,  372 

South  Carolina     

105,  396 

168,  448 

30,  944 

9,056 

11,  259 

161,  025 

52,  068 

Georgia  «    -  

126,  904 

288,  807 

52,  060 

30,  547 

35,  599 

132,  718 

86,  157 

Florida 

101  486 

143,  297 

17,  958 

8,713 

8,274 

104,  443 

57,  447 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

191  413 

235  685 

35  370 

19,  829 

21,  056 

166,  961 

56,  434 

Tennessee 

187  538 

337,  151 

36,  980 

26,  183 

23,  901 

203,  380 

77,  818 

Alabam  a    „  ,  m  m  , 

84,  084 

184,  400 

32,  863 

16,  054 

12,  740 

90,  713 

74,  710 

Mississippi  

81,  928 

135,  753 

24,  968 

12,  231 

10,  892 

77,  065 

45,  219 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

61,  540 

110,  176 

11,  995 

8,428 

19,  849 

49,  306 

37,  017 

[Louisiana  

48,  475 

114,  121 

10,  835 

9,957 

8,273 

73,  090 

36,  359 

OVIahnmn 

113  495 

217,  309 

19,  777 

24,  116 

15,  184 

101,  063 

77,  033 

Texas          

395,  339 

642,  038 

62,  060 

70,  247 

62,  045 

248,  060 

224,  809 

MOUNTAIN: 
New  Mexico 

4,450 

23,  884 

1,159 

3,839 

1,328 

9,370 

6,220 

Arizona 

2  065 

2,925 

435 

189 

152 

1,781 

1,146 

Other  States 

558 

195 

90 

97 

251 

307 

TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

1 

"3 

1 

a 

d 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

f  DEBT  ON 
'  f  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Total  

1  13,  815 

12 
14 
4 
13 
14 

20 
7 
62 
29 

9 

2,  700,  155 

12,  370 

$117,766,295 

1,740 

814,428,046 

18,  521 

$19,630,844 

12,  161 

1,  664,  105 

Alabama: 
Alabama  -  Cren- 
shaw 

1,403 
1,629 
551 
1,673 
1,608 

3,087 
701 
25,284 
3,789 

951 

12 
9 
4 
13 
12 

17 
6 
54 
21 

9 

34,950 
45,700 
4,900 
30,  125 
25,200 

44,496 
25,900 
2,056,669 
61,775 

50.250 

1 
2 

55 
3,590 

12 
14 
4 
13 
13 

19 
7 
62 
28 

8 

4,859 
10,  347 
2,477 
5,914 
4,201 

8,612 
5,232 

186,  518 
10,  481 

4.852 

8 
13 
3 
12 
12 

18 
5 
60 
22 

4 

483 
1,056 
237 
76S 
651 

1,233 
574 
16,627 
1,894 

324 

Baldwin  

Barbour  

Bethel     

2 

1 

2 

1 
16 
1 

1,575 
2,000 

1,123 
160 
255,  790 
14,  000 

Bethlehem  

Bibb 

Bigbee  

Birmingham  

Blount         

Bullock  •  Centen- 
nial    

i  Exclusive  of  statistics  forjSO  churches  belonging  to  the  Columbia  Association— 24  in  the  District  of 
Columbia  and  6  in  the  State  of  Maryland— which  are  reported  with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


123 


TABLE  7. — NUMBEB  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

1 

& 

1 

*8 

1 
fc 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

! 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Alabama  —  Con. 
Butler  

29 
18 
36 
18 
9 

18 
23 

11 

18 

7 

16 
20 
20 

14 
26 

12 
22 
22 
52 

17 

35 
16 
16 
11 
23 

21 
8 
16 
1 
8 

13 
13 

12 

19 
11 

27 
5 
20 
15 
27 

12 
14 
20 
10 
8 

15 
12 
32 
17 
15 

12 
6 
6 
24 

B 

3,458 
2,160 
6,349 
2,712 
921 

1,819 
3,791 
805 
2,450 
571 

1,809 
3,118 
3,166 

2,446 
5,893 

1,582 
4,828 
5,063 
7,553 
2,464 

4,858 
3,753 
2,676 
1,822 
6,008 

2,425 
959 
2,457 
153 
1,229 

1,189 
1,615 

984 

3,454 
1,459 

4,448 
334 
6,668 
8,649 
5,036 

1,504 
1,585 
2,135 
903 
553 

2,704 
1,957 
3,814 
3,337 
1,649 

1,470 
743 
723 
2,981 
352 

27 
17 
32 
15 
8 

18 
23 
9 
15 
6 

14 
17 
18 

14 
24 

11 
20 
18 
44 
16 

30 
12 
14 
8 
20 

18 
6 
14 
1 
8 

11 
11 

12 

15 
9 

22 
5 
19 
15 
27 

9 
12 
20 
9 
6 

14 
12 
32 
16 
13 

11 
6 
6 
19 
5 

$96,  500 
109,099 
177,  150 
60,  575 
15,  700 

31,  400 
39,  760 
9,150 
34,  785 
3,800 

17,  700 
26,400 
94,450 

137,450 
224,  250 

62,  550 
145,  800 
185,  650 
123,  255 
18,  615 

90,250 
89,700 
103,  158 
95,  000 
323,  540 

78,  650 
10,400 
34,  025 
(2> 
22,700 

53,  600 
23,  660 

13,  000 

102,950 
22,000 

87,000 
3,800 
366,  169 
466,  055 
233,700 

12,  300 
12,  790 
33,120 
18,450 
6,000 

67,  637 
83,800 
54,  710 
91,050 
18,500 

10,650 
24,300 
5,560 
46,  785 
5,050 

2 
3 

1 

$27,  500 
14,  841 
650 

29 
18 
34 
18 
9 

17 
23 
11 
16 

7 

16 
20 
20 

14 
26 

12 
22 
22 
52 
17 

34 

16 
16 
11 
23 

21 

8 
16 
1 
8 

13 
12 

12 

19 
10 

26 
5 
20 
13 
27 

12 
14 
19 
10 
8 

15 
12 
30 
16 
14 

12 
6 
6 
23 

r 

$14,  529 
11,  739 
26,  579 
6,838 
2,232 

7,393 
7,329 
2,013 
5,046 
807 

2,392 
4,710 
8,371 

19,  652 
31,286 

5,158 
38,  516 
26,  980 
25,  812 
3,823 

14,  726 
16,  591 
14,932 
11,483 
42,  332 

8,694 
4,617 
6,822 
(2) 
2,169 

5,222 
5,750 

1,687 

13,  186 
5,203 

12,  175 
437 
55,  403 
64,  290 
40,  766 

1,906 
1,752 
7,464 
5,344 
1,860 

9,062 
11,  339 
9,792 
23,  522 
4,094 

23 

14 
34 
17 
8 

16 
22 
9 
11 
5 

13 
15 
16 

10 
24 

7 
20 
19 
45 
14 

30 
13 

15 
9 
22 

19 
7 
11 
1 
8 

10 
in 

11 

18 
10 

25 
4 
19 
10 
27 

10 
10 
17 
6 
6 

14 
10 
26 
9 
14 

1,823 
1,349 
3,758 
963 
410 

1,083 
1,822 
363 
821 
186 

722 
1,160 
1,232 

1,935 
3,068 

551 
2,644 
1,924 
4,059 
777 

2,682 
1,873 
1,726 
799 
3,988 

1,269 
477 
892 
130 
420 

638 
991 

734 

1,911 
1,186 

2,170 
214 
4,732 
4,390 
2,897 

566 
597 
999 
389 
268 

1,246 
911 
1,912 
1,610 
1,025 

204 
683 
353 
1,489 
143 

Cahaba 

Calhoun 

Carey 

Central 

Cherokee 

Chilton  

2 

1,029 

Choctaw 

Clarke  

1 

480 

Clay 

Clear  Creek  

2 
1 
3 

5 
1 

1 
4 
1 
1 
2 

2 
1 

235 
400 
468 

34,  680 
70,000 

50 
8,935 
17,  000 
17 
191 

2,590 
14,000 

Cleburne  

Coffee  

Colbert  -  Lauder- 
dale  

Columbia  

Conecuh  

Coosa  River.  _. 

Covington 

Cullman 

Dale  . 

DeKalb 

East  Liberty  
Elmore 

Escambia 

2 
5 

2 
1 
3 

20,  040 
68,892 

8,500 
300 
546 

Etowah  _ 

Fayette 

Franklin  

Geneva  

Indian  Creek 

Judson  

1 

2 
1 

260 

12,000 
93 

Lamar 

Limestone 

Lookout    Moun- 
tain 

Madison  -  Liber- 
ty   

2 
2 

2 

4,550 
2,500 

145 

Marion., 

Marshall 

*!Mjneral  Springs 

Mobile  

7 
1 
4 

1 
1 

94,  405 
23,  375 
60,190 

110 
300 

Montgomery 

Morgan  

Mud  Creek 

Muscle  Shoals  
Pickens 

Pine  Barren  
Pleasant  Grove— 

Randolph 

1 

17 

Russell  

1 
2 
1 

8,000 
1,243 
238 

St.  Clair    . 

Salem-Troy  
Sand  Mountain.. 

Sardis 

1,341 
9,817 
739 
12,  170 
415 

^ 

Selma 

6 
6 
H 

Shady  Grove 

Shelby  

1 

700 

Sfosey  

2  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


124 


CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OP  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

1 

"8 

1 
% 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Alabama—  Con. 
Sulphur  Springs.. 
Tallapoosa 

15 
13 
22 
26 
10 

17 
32 
15 
1 

8 

9 
23 

11 
7 
10 

28 
10 
11 
15 
4 

15 
16 
23 
8 

7 

16 
4 
8 
7 
6 

21 
13 
14 

7 
14 

5 
13 
20 
1 
29 

15 
14 
12 
9 
9 

12 
10 
12 
7 
4 
1 

1,723 
2,160 
2,519 
7,056 
1,225 

3,592 
3,656 
1,117 
20 

1,478 

1,112 
4,164 
1,542 
554 
1,513 

2,322 
631 
1,613 
2,280 
482 

3,019 
1,496 
9,624 

918 
1,043 

1,933 
338 
1,049 
748 

984 

3,352 
4,539 
3,670 
662 
4,160 

565 
2,337 
3,763 
226 
4,193 

1,195 
4,489 
1,231 
485 
617 

2,081 
1,672 
1,496 
454 
241 
50 

13 
9 
17 

25 
10 

17 
27 
13 
1 

6 

8 
20 
10 
6 
8 

21 
8 
9 
13 
4 

13 
11 
21 
4 
7 

14 
3 
8 
7 
6 

20 
11 
13 

7 
11 

3 
9 

15 
1 
24 

11 
13 
12 
6 
4 

12 
8 
9 
5 
3 
1 

$14,400 
47,  650 
35,  900 
431,  201 
47,  300 

93,500 
49,  155 
14,  050 
(2) 

78,500 

64,600 
84,  775 
56,  030 
3,000 
80,  000 

45,  000 
16,  650 
55,  350 
65,  650 
26,  800 

82,900 
40,  150 
520,  700 
43,  100 
16,600 

74,  300 
43,  000 
17,460 
12,  000 
37,400 

133,  750 
238,  100 
220,  900 
9,250 
255,  244 

3,700 
90,  950 
136,  200 
(2) 
201,  800 

33,  650 
137,880 
12,  920 
4,200 
6,250 

106,  500 
66,150 
37,  600 
5,650 
4,300 
(a) 

i 

$21 

15 
13 
21 
26 
10 

17 
31 

14 
1 

8 

9 
23 

11 
6 
10 

26 
10 
11 
15 
4 

15 
16 
22 
8 
7 

16 
4 
8 
6 
5 

21 
13 

14 
7 
14 

4 
13 
19 
1 

28 

14 
14 
12 
9 
9 

12 
10 
11 
5 
2 
1 

$2,078 
12.  627 
8,184 
41,419 
7,125 

12,429 
11,081 
2,143 

(3) 

17,  318 

10,  266 
16,  146 
7,085 
1,010 
10,  471 

12,  189 
2,507 
9,892 
11,  935 
4,261 

19,898 
10,  804 
61,451 
8,489 
6,818 

11,075 
6,241 
4,496 
2,193 
7,060 

17,563 
54,  596 
38,  051 
6,335 
46,544 

1,134 
15,  939 
32,425 
(2) 
34,347 

8,807 
37,  326 
3,600 
1,096 
2,132 

24,891 
11,268 
8,031 
2,950 

8 

14 

19 
25 
10 

17 
29 
8 
1 

7 

7 
21 
10 
7 
9 

25 
7 
11 
13 
4 

15 

14 
22 

7 
7 

15 
4 

8 

7 

0 

18 
12 
13 
6 
13 

2 
13 
19 

1 
25 

12 
12 

11 
4 

7 

12 
9 
11 
5 
2 
1 

770 
874 
1,550 
3.855 
636 

1,682 
2,251 
348 
28 

894 

819 
2,034 
1,164 
384 
903 

1,  555 
440 
990 
1,384 
345 

2,541 
975 
5,752 
740 
730 

1,398 
270 
575 
436 
713 

2,251 
2,353 
2,204 
425 
1,  702 

160 
1,399 
2,555 
215 
2,873 

1,035 
3,  346 

762 
194 
428 

1,476 
988 
841 
279 
186 
50 

Tennessee  River.. 
Tuscaloosa 

2 
6 

1,575 
74,  875 

Tuskegee 

Unity 

Walker 

3 

5,125 

Washington  
Unassociated  

Arizona: 
General  Conven- 
tion      . 

4 

3 

4 

25,400 

4,448 
"""3,116 

Arkansas: 
Arkansas  Valley.. 
Bartholomew  
Benton 

Big  Creek 

Black  River 

Buckner     __  .. 

2 

1,700 

Caddo  River  
Carey    - 

3 

1 

9,278 
88 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Central 

2 
4 
9 
1 

4,750 
818 
95,627 
13,  000 

Clear  Creek  
Concord 

Crooked  Creek... 
Current  River 

Dardanelle-Rus- 
sellville 

1 
2 
1 
1 
2 

2 
4 
1 

600 
12,025 
113 
1,000 
375 

14,  290 
74,441 
6,000 

Delta    ._  

Faulkner  

Fourche  Valley.  „ 
Gainesville 

Greene  .. 

Harmony 

Hope 

Independence 

Liberty 

Little  Red  River. 
Little  River  

3 
1 
1 
3 

3 
6 
1 
1 

11,  550 
14,  500 
(2) 
10,  565 

1,450 
41,055 
600 
100 

Mississippi 

Monroe  

Mount  £ion  
Ouachlta 

Pulaski     ... 

Red  River  
Rocky  Bayou  
Stone  Van  Buren 

Tri-County 

2 
3 
1 

9,000 
3,275 
6,300 

Washington  
White    —  -  

White  River  
Woodruff 

Unassociated  

2  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statis- 
tics of  any  individual  church* 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


125 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

M 
1 

O 

1 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Jj? 
pts 

sa 

gg 

1 
| 

11 

*•*  o 

sJ  a 

•3  £ 
O 

"fl 

11 

(I  5 

3  a, 

A  g 

o 

a 

D 
o 

a 

<! 

1! 
H 

OM 

<w 

,0? 

'o 

Florida: 
Alachua  -    

8 
9 
8 
14 
8 

7 
16 
8 
21 
22 

10 
9 
18 
35 
23 

13 

7 
7 
14 

7 

14 
12 
12 
17 
4 

19 
28 
11 
13 
15 

16 
10 

5 

15 
40 
10 
12 
16 

10 
16 
9 
12 
14 

6 
21 
16 
9 
13 

18 
12 
9 
17 
7 

17 
13 
12 
4 
5 

955 

1,505 
433 
3,797 
784 

970 
1,  503 
2,115 
4,205 
4,913 

937 
1,460 
2,734 
11,513 
3,040 

1,261 
1,227 
540 
2,674 
455 

2,615 
3,713 
3,389 
2,115 
439 

4,32/3 
8,791 
1,992 
1,760 
1,674 

6,078 
2,296 
803 

2,576 
33,  734 
976 
1,929 
2,720 

1,759 
2,750 
1,413 
2,679 
1,187 

756 
6,958 
2,319 
767 
1,638 

3,615 
2,271 
1,538 
3,587 
657 

2,119 
2,111 
1,292 
464 
355 

8 
9 
7 
12 
4 

7 
15 
8 
21 
22 

8 
9 
18 
31 
22 

12 
6 
5 
13 
6 

11 
11 
11 
17 
4 

18 
25 
11 
13 
13 

15 
9 
5 

15 
37 
10 
12 
16 

9 
15 
9 
12 
13 

4 
19 
15 
7 
13 

17 
11 
8 
16 
5 

17 
13 
12 
3 
3 

$40,  250 
100,  800 
6,200 
235,  124 
5,720 

39,  300 
20,  725 
106,  300 
227,  900 
146,  595 

13,360 
209,000 
155,000 
962,  026 
106,  750 

15,  100 
97,  600 
3,710 
78,300 
30,  700 

161,450 
190,  560 
385,  000 
81,  000 
4,050 

314,343 
276,  636 
137,000 
157.  150 
43;  325 

356,450 
260,  500 
21,050 

79,  300 
2,475,042 
15,800 
87,  366 
75,400 

67,000 
34,750 
14,050 
108,  938 
29,950 

5,133 
283,150 
42,  155 
2,885 
14,208 

523,450 
22,400 
11,600 
71,  059 
2,400 

34,  200 
50,800 
43,000 
1,550 
3,600 

1 
1 

$2,500 
7,500 

8 
9 
7 
13 
8 

7 
16 
8 
20 

21 

10 
9 
19 
35 
23 

13 

7 
7 
14 
7 

14 
12 
12 
17 
3 

19 
28 
11 
13 
15 

16 
9 
5 

15 
39 
10 
12 
16 

10 
16 
9 
11 
14 

6 
20 
16 
5 
13 

18 
12 
9 
17 
6 

17 
13 
12 
3 
4 

$5,  552 
11,  363 
1,419 
35,  657 

787 

2,940 
3,605 
27,  365 
25,  518 
45,  951 

3,254 
23,  190 
29,  723 
164,  8S9 
17,  770 

7,127 
21,837 
1,324 
17,  807 
3,562 

17,  862 
35,  703 
98,  572 
14,  512 
563 

36,443 
66,232 
21,922 
25,  496 
6,954 

64,  992 
32,  733 
4,761 

14,563 
418,951 
2,197 
8,269 
14,024 

7,717 
3,834 
5,769 
15,  755 
5,375 

745 
41,  217 
9,158 
306 
3,658 

46,  510 
4,692 
2,746 
20,938 
445 

6,283 
6,311 
6,203 
94 
1,489 

8 
7 
5 
13 

e 

14 

15 
20 

g 

9 

17 
34 
17 

7 
6 
6 
12 
6 

13 
12 
11 
15 
3 

17 
27 
10 
12 
11 

16 
10 
3 

13 
40 
3 
9 

12 

8 
16 
9 
9 
11 

3 

19 
16 
7 
12 

13 
12 
8 
17 
3 

13 

7 
7 

518 
607 
197 
2,783 
297 

337 
886 
2,016 
2,849 
3,644 

219 
1,231 
1,691 
10,064 
1,377 

659 
1,078 
254 
1,669 
416 

1,445 
3,076 
2,673 
1,276 
180 

3,214 
4,973 
1,386 
1,216 
685 

4,171 
1,382 
395 

1,210 
24,963 
110 
1,161 
1,254 

1,064 
884 
987 
1,528 
987 

120 
3,460 
1,651 
250 
725 

2,770 
965 
631 
2,244 
115 

862 
727 
501 

Beulah 

Black  Creek  

Florida  

5 
1 

1 
3 
4 
2 
10 

1 
4 
2 
16 
1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 

2 
3 
4 
2 
1 

5 
8 
4 
5 

29,  250 

25 

50 
142 
26,  350 
100 
14,  074 

4,000 
33,  519 
1,330 
172,  850 
17,  400 

179 
30,  745 
18 
200 
6,000 

31,390 
21,  305 
75,  900 
7,800 
400 

14,970 
43,  275 
22,690 
49,  650 

Graves    

Harmony 

Holmes  " 

Indian  River  
Jackson       , 

Jacksonville    

Lafayette 

Lake    

Marion    -. 

Miami 

Middle  Florida,  .. 

New  River  

Northwest  Coast, 
Okaloosa  

Orange  Blossom.. 
Pasco  .     .    

Peace  River 

Pensacola  Bay  

Pinellas  

Santa  Fe  River—  . 
Santa  Rosa  

Southern  Florida. 
Southwest  Florida. 
St.  Johns  River... 
Suwannee 

Tampa  Bay 

6 
4 
1 

257,  973 
26,200 
1,800 

Wekiwa 

West  Florida  

Georgia: 
Appalachee 

Atlanta     - 

20 
2 

487,  555 
80 

Baptist  Union  
BenHUl-Irwin... 
Bethel  . 

1 

2,500 

Carroll  ton 

Catoosa  

1 

100 

Central 

Central  Western, 
Chattahoochee... 
Chattooga 

2 
1 

19,000 
886 

Chestatee 

Colquitt  

1 
4 

13 
12,  370 

Columbus  ,  ...  , 

Concord 

Consolation  

Coosa  

1 
1 

1 
1 

475 
5 

2,400 
500 

Coosawattee  
Daniel 

Dodge 

Ebenezer  

Ellijay  

2 

83 

126 


CENSUS1   OE    RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936— Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHUECH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

11 

*•*  o 

6 
11 

25 
18 
17 

32 

5 
8 
8 
9 

10 
9 
22 
24 

7 

23 
13 
11 
16 
9 

14 

11 
8 
10 
6 

12 
11 
11 
17 
12 

2 
8 

15 
6 
8 

12 
8 
11 
4 
14 

24 
11 
12 
31 
9 

13 
8 
10 
8 
10 

24 
9 
32 

14 
7 

12 
12 

| 
< 

®fl 
A  ^ 

o  * 

I 

If 
» 

1 

11 

S  S 
S  p, 

-ag 
0M 

1 

CQ 

Georgia—Con. 
Enon 

6 
13 

28 
21 
18 

33 

5 
9 
9 
9 

12 
10 
23 

25 

7 

24 
13 
16 
16 
10 

14 
13 
10 
10 
6 

13 
11 
11 
18 
13 

2 

9 

15 

7 
8 

14 
11 
11 
4 

14 

26 
12 
13 
32 
9 

15 
9 
11 
8 
11 

27 
9 
33 

15 
7 

15 
13 

876 
2,776 
5,839 
5,093 
3,076 

5,674 
573 
1,018 
1,642 
1,682 

2,245 
1,524 
5,831 
9,482 
1,020 

5,215 
1,495 
2,752 
2,845 
1,721 

3,065 
2,328 
1,573 
1,472 
439 

3,111 
1,582 
1,358 
3,037 
3,212 

372 
1,253 
2,557 
814 
1,121 

2,655 
1,503 
4,600 
486 
4,883 

5,099 
1,288 
2,216 
4,332 
1,106 

2,484 
1,470 
1,880 
1,081 
1,411 

10,602 
1,254 
8,793 
1,973 
1,346 

2,540 
1,725 

$5,200 
77,  750 
241,  800 
196,  145 
135,  050 

217,  150 
4,400 
9,050 
72,  810 
66,  500 

47,  400 
9,700 
112,  418 
1,  398,  240 
6,600 

36,  900 
37,  900 
14,  950 
64,  200 
65,  100 

55,  800 
40,  500 
12,  100 
18,  375 
9,550 

187,975 
16,200 
44,300 
117,  700 
84,400 

64,  000 
59,  020 
18,  400 
46,  700 

13,  650 
7,625 
673,000 
2,000 
253,  750 

82,  800 
6,600 
73,  020 
222,  285 
38,  800 

18,  200 
6,500 
40,700 
34,850 
36,500 

530,082 
13,400 
456,300 
26,800 
13,400 

57,450 
47.350 

1 

$15 

6 

13 
28 
21 
18 

33 
4 
7 
9 
9 

11 
10 
23 
25 
6 

23 

12 
16 
16 
10 

14 
13 
9 
10 
5 

13 
10 
11 
18 
13 

2 
9 

14 
6 
8 

14 
10 
11 
4 
13 

25 
11 
13 
32 
9 

13 
5 
10 
8 
10 

27 
9 
33 
15 
6 

15 
12 

$848 
7,764 
37,  077 
30,  499 
18,  942 

26,  060 
312 
1,237 
8,400 
6,673 

6,643 
3,367 
14,  922 
69,  900 
1,030 

5,045 
5,156 
1,706 
15,  044 
7,245 

10,  858 
7,346 
3,745 
2,799 
5,137 

20,027 
2,464 
9,808 
16,029 
7,638 

6,575 
8,068 
2,257 
4,863 

2,335 
1,434 
59,  723 
178 
46,  716 

13,  330 
811 
13,  103 
29,350 
5,428 

3,293 
399 
5,573 
6,243 
3,538 

84,463 
2,565 
46,453 
6,153 
1,914 

11,  334 

7.690 

5 
13 
24 
18 
13 

32 
2 

4 
8 
5 

12 
4 
21 
23 
5 

15 
11 
3 
15 

8 

13 
13 

9 
7 
5 

11 
5 
6 
16 
13 

1 
8 
11 

5 

7 

9 
4 
9 
4 
13 

24 
10 
12 
26 
9 

13 

318 
1,504 
2,743 
2,359 
1,223 

2,990 
180 
180 
786 
713 

1,400 
305 
2,071 
5,730 
360 

1,164 
601 
160 
1,151 
690 

1,375 
1,153 
508 
526 
236 

1,761 
368 
574 
1,441 
1,221 

85 
611 
1,218 
390 
575 

557 
210 
2,791 
309 
2,623 

2,353 
537 
1,160 
2,759 
689 

979 

Fairburn 

Flint  River 

1 
3 

1 

1 

4,000 
9,500 
2,500 

5,000 

Floyd             

Friendship 

Georgia  

Gflmer-Fannin-  .  . 
Good  Samaritan.. 
Gordon 

Grady 

Habersham 

2 

1,235 

Haralson 

Hebron 

1 

5 

3,500 
95,  360 

Hephzibah      

Hiawassee 

Hightower 

1 

75 

Houston 

Jasper 

Kflpatriek 

Kimbell 

1 
2 

1,000 
12,  150 

Laurens 

Lawrence  ville  
Liberty 

1 

166 

Little  River 

Lookout  Valley— 
Mallary  

1 
2 

2,000 
29,500 

Mell 

Mercer  

1 

85 

Middle 

Middle  Cherokee. 
Miller 

1 

21 

Morgan 

Morganton  

2 
1 
2 

6,403 
2,900 
2,485 

Mountaintown,  .  _ 
Mount  Vernon.__ 

Mulberry  

New  Hope.- 

1 
1 

70 
72,000 

New  Sunbury  
New  Union 

Noonday  

2 
2 

4,200 
470 

North  Georgia  
Notla  River 

Ogeechee  River..  _ 
Piedmont 

1 
8 

18,000 
29,972 

Pine  Mountain.... 

Pleasant  Grove- 
Pleasant  Valley.  . 
Polk  . 

1 

450 

10 
6 
9 

25 
9 
30 
11 
6 

10 

8 

975 
519 
625 

5,412 
592 
3,899 
732 
500 

1,525 
731 

Pulaski-Bleckley. 
Rabun.^  ..„  

Rehoboth  

5 

31,050 

Roswell  

Sarepta  

3 
1 

47,000 
7,000 

Smyrna.    .  

South  River  

Stone  Mountain.. 
Summerhill  

2 

222 

'Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


127 


TABLE  7.— NUMBER  AND  MEMBEESHIP  OP  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1 936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

i 

rQ 

| 

*0 

1 

£ 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

I 

Georgia—  Con. 
Tallapoosa. 

1C 

< 
2( 

15 

18 
30 

1,844 
1,518 
951 

9 

{ 

8 
U 

13 

17 
29 

4 

$20,  000 
49,000 
12,  300 

58,  100 
46,650 
98,  150 
6,300 
188,  150 

73,450 
365,400 
3,700 

10,  100 
5,500 
11,200 
(2) 
144,055 

228,  500 
85,  400 
136,950 
58,050 
19,700 

67,029 
17,  000 
247,  450 
9,600 
33,000 

61,250 
48,946 
244,350 
55,  100 
GO 

77,300 
34,000 
93,500 

(3) 
25,700 

41,  550 
36,000 
69,060 
168,  350 
94,  300 

11,900 
177,000 
119,700 
18,000 
195,  750 

58,000 
130,300 
373,  500 
118,800 
149,  900 

; 

$73 
7,600 

10 

i 

9 

2( 

15 

18 
28 

4 

4 
6 
1 
31 

16 
18 
31 
12 
9 

20 
14 
25 
5 
9 

30 
21 
24 
24 
2 

18 
10 
20 

1 
2 

15 
5 
29 
30 
9 

13 
26 
10 
13 
18 

9 
19 
16 
8 
18 

$3,  154 
7,167 
2,135 

21,  495 
6,406 
34,  254 
1,270 
41  604 

8 
t 

5 
5 
2( 

12 

17 
21 

/ 

6 
4 
4 
1 
30 

16 
18 
28 
12 
8 

20 
14 
24 
4 
7 

28 
21 
24 
23 
2 

17 
10 
20 

1 
2 

10 
5 
17 
29 
8 

10 
24 
9 
10 

18 

8 
19 
16 

7 
15 

552 
694 
400 

1,188 
619 
2,591 
90 
2,101 

1,365 
4,673 

155 

309 
108 
148 
70 
2,524 

5,780 
1,673 
3,078 
1,154 
469 

1,277 
605 
3,200 
213 
50J 

1,277 
1,481 
3,421 
937 
68 

1,412 
837 
2,437 

35 

315 

871 
716 
1,235 
3,194 
913 

535 
2,661 
1,401 
913 
1,354 

568 
2,222 
4,290 
1,018 
2,328 

Tattnall-Evans 
Telfair  

Thomas 

2,417 
1,802 
5,032 
857 
3,436 

2,719 
7,861 
464 

". 

10,  000 

Tucker  

Tugalo. 

* 

2,500 

Turner  

Valdosta  

1 

11,000 

Washington  

13  701 

Western    _„ 

] 

50 
25 

191 

72,  470 
796 

2,386 
539 
1,051 

23,220 

55,  108 
12,  070 
24,  475 
9,024 
3,915 

13,848 
4,865 
31,  924 
2,437 
4,318 

7,263 
14,  105 
24,438 
5,413 
(*) 

13,310 
7,436 
25,003 

(2) 
(2) 

6,609 
6,928 
9,916 
23,  459 
12,  648 

2,872 
26,  922 
14,  282 
4,667 
22,  761 

7,743 
24,  161 
57,  810 
16,  271 
31,  568 

White  

Illinois: 
Antioch    _ 

{ 

1 
32 

16 
21 
31 
12 
9 

22 
14 
27 
5 
9 

30 
21 
24 
25 

2 

19 
10 
21 

1 
3 

15 
5 
29 
31 
9 

14 
26 
10 
15 
19 

9 
19 
16 
8 
18 

330 
146 
666 
101 
4,741 

5,515 
3,434 
5,193 
1,319 
812 

1,999 
1,145 
3,991 
602 
717 

2,303 
2,458 
4,477 
2,754 
111 

2,272 
1,137 
3,507 

41 
613 

2,255 
1,449 
4,999 
4,624 
1,709 

1,672 
4,326 
1,954 
1,689 
2,251 

1,338 
3,604 
4,762 
2,377 
4.168 

Bay  Creek  

Big  Saline.  . 

8 
1 
28 

14 
20 
29 
12 
9 

20 
13 
25 
4 
8 

30 

20 
24 
24 
2 

17 
10 
19 

1 
3 

14 
4 
26 
15 
8 

14 
25 
10 
15 
18 

9 
19 
16 

8 
17 

1 

400 

Central  Illinois.  _. 
Clear  Creek  

9 
1 

*i 

13,454 

58,  805 
700 
1,600 
5,025 

East  St.  Louis  
Fairfield  _. 

Franklin  

Kaskaskia... 

Louisville  

Macoupin 

2 

4,175 

Mount  Erie  

Nine  Mile  

4 

50,  304 

Olney  __ 

Palestine 

1 
3 

c 

I 
I 

62 

1,375 
5,300 
1,200 
684 

Rehoboth  

Salem  South 

Saline 

Sandy  Creek. 
Shelby  

Union. 

2 

6,242 

Westfield  

Williamson, 

3 

3,396 

Indiana: 
Palestine  

Kansas: 
Spring  River  

Kentucky: 
Allen 

Baptist  

1 
3 
2 
1 

2,100 
2,289 
40,  450 
3,500 

Barren  River  
Bell 

Bethel  

Blackford 

Blood  River  
Boone's  Creek  
Booneville 

1 
2 
2 
2 

1 
2 
5 
1 
2 

6,945 
2,250 
900 
3,323 

10,000 
14,406 
61,  530 
11,500 
4,032 

Bracken  

Breckenridge  
Caldwell  

Campbell.. 

Central  .  . 

Christian  

2  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


128 


OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — HTJMBEB  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHTJRCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Kentucky—Con. 
Crittenden  -. 

11 
36 

18 

e 
14 

13 
1C 

3 
15 
11 
9 
20 

17 
26 
i 

1,658 
8,087 
1,097 
2,784 
820 

422 
6,738 
1,376 
3,784 
489 

1,126 
2,781 
797 
1,086 
4,452 

1,365 
2,813 
373 
1,735 
634 

1,356 
3,404 
4,730 
2,032 
4,094 

2,419 
2,224 
27,949 
4,397 
2,283 

439 
5,190 
4,719 
3,426 
5,937 

944 
4,770 
2,620 
3,131 
211 

2,334 

3,385 
594 
1,048 
2,233 

1,185 
2,604 
3,918 
2,015 
1,094 

3,390 
603 
1,791 
1,987 
2,569 

10 
35 
6 
16 
6 

2 
14 
13 

10 

7 

2 

15 

c 

9 
18 

7 
23 
6 
7 
4 

10 
27 
24 
14 
23 

14 
15 
49 
19 
19 

3 
21 
28 
13 
16 

6 
28 
26 
22 
3 

11 
25 
3 
14 
18 

11 
14 
12 
7 
5 

14 
5 
13 
10 
12 

$58,500 
434,  065 
12,500 
35,  750 
10,000 

(2) 
461,890 
71,600 
144,  575 
7,975 

(2) 
36,  750 
3,100 
46,  500 
271,200 

7,500 
177,  282 
16,  190 
94,  500 
3,700 

9,600 
77,915 
83,  850 
44,950 
130,700 

37,  100 
32,  500 
2,  198,  395 
48,  300 
28,500 

2,000 
387,800 
73,  300 
116,350 
486,000 

9,500 
99,  000 
44,413 
89,  650 
23,  250 

58,600 
83,950 
3,200 
20,036 
26,  100 

20,  200 
111,  100 
85,  525 
48,975 
3,900 

135,  100 
10,100 
9,774 
97,  800 
101,800 

1 
4 
1 
1 

$5,000 
11,  250 
600 
100 

11 
36 
7 
17 
6 

2 
14 
13 
10 
6 

3 

15 
11 
8 
20 

14 
22 
5 
7 
4 

13 
28 
24 
15 
23 

16 
15 
49 
20 
20 

3 
22 

29 

17 
17 

9 
30 
24 
22 
2 

12 
26 
4 
15 
19 

12 
14 

13 

7 

6 

13 
5 
11 
11 
13 

$9,  093 
67,  743 
3,367 
5,342 
882 

(2) 
66,  656 
11,  690 
27,164 
835 

10,  954 
3,868 
506 
4,710 
26,  297 

915 
32,  678 
336 
10,  405 
566 

2,414 
10,416 
20,522 
8,960 
22,  440 

8,387 
4,  564 
370,015 
9,967 
3,495 

173 
34,940 
8,372 
18,  112 
58,663 

456 
17,003 
7,195 
15,  445 
(2) 

10,  062 
10,  694 
458 
3,882 
3,832 

3,554 
13,  250 
20,  606 
9,482 
575 

24,  071 
2,301 
650 
9,949 
10,  945 

10 
36 

7 
15 
4 

2 
14 
13 
8 
5 

3 

12 
3 

8 
19 

3 

21 
2 
6 
4 

5 
22 
18 
15 
18 

13 
13 
48 
16 
15 

3 

20 
28 
17 
15 

2 

24 
19 
20 
1 

11 
26 
3 
15 
15 

9 
13 
13 
7 
6 

14 
4 
9 
10 
13 

917 
5,134 
472 
1,676 
220 

215 
4,204 
1,032 
2,512 
255 

769 
855 
138 
637 
2,192 

166 
2,690 
145 
774 
188 

190 
1,661 
1,757 
1,474 
2,289 

797 
823 
20,271 
1,528 
1,021 

125 
3,277 
2,230 
1,733 
4,185 

226 
1,936 
1,117 
1,704 
34 

879 
2,387 
200 
1,027 

782 

517 
1,470 
1,699 
895 
280 

1,822 
272 
595 
964 
1,740 

Daviess-McLean- 
3Sast  Lynn     ,  - 

East  Union 

Edmonson 

Elkhora  No.  1 

Elkhora  No.  2,__. 
Enterprise 

3 
1 

1 

15,103 
750 
23,000 

Franklin 

Freedom 

Friendship 

Gasper  River  
Goose  Creek 

Goshen  - 

Graves  -     ~. 

2 

1 

106,  782 

82 
21,  780 

Green  River 

Greenup--  
Greenville 

Henry            -  _. 

1 

3,650 

Irvine 

Jackson 

13 

28 
25 
15 
23 

16 
15 
49 
20 
20 

2? 
29 

17 
17 

9 
31 
27 
23 
3 

12 
26 
4 
15 
20 

12 
14 
13 

7 
7 

14 
5 
16 
11 
13 

Laurel  Kiver  
Liberty 

3 
2 

1,758 
1,775 

Lincoln 

Little  Bethel  
Little  River 

6 

1 

12,864 
115 

Logan 

Long  Run   

25 
1 
1 

455,  554 
75 
24 

Lynn 

Lynn  Camp  

McCreary 

Mount  ZJion  

4 
1 

37,725 
5,300 

Muhlenburg  - 

Nelson  

North  Bend  _~  ,_ 

B 

58,  751 

North  Concord.  .- 

Ohio 

i 
1 

2 

150 
500 
2,208 

Ohio  River  , 

Ohio  Valley      .  . 

Old  Bethel    

Owen  

Pulaski  

2 

13,  625 

Rockcastle  

Hussell  

Russell  Creek,  .„_ 
Salem.  -_  ._ 

1 

100 

Severns  Valley—- 
Shelby   

1 

10,  500 

Simpson  

South  Concord,.- 

South  District  
South  Kentucky. 
South  Union  
Sulphur  Fork  
Tates  Creek  

1 

13 

1 

12,  666 

1   Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,' 
tics  of  any  individual  church. 


to  avoid  disclosing  the  statis- 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


129 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

ta  „« 

sf 

| 

II 

P  ft 

g£ 

1 

I 

If 

t-4     O 

sa 
&  S 
O 

I 
| 

II 
I» 

I 

o 

Kentucky—  Con. 
Ten  Mile       -  

8 
15 
11 

18 
21 

18 
24 
28 
9 

16 
12 
6 
11 
18 

4 
13 
14 
6 
15 

6 
7 
16 
21 
11 

14 
15 
13 
7 
10 

11 
3 

19 
15 
16 

10 
19 
18 
8 
19 

6 
10 
11 
18 
8 

13 
5 

20 
12 
7 
7 
6 
12 

1 

1,336 
1,331 
1,212 

3,906 
4,583 

2,998 
3,493 
5,532 
1,414 

2,046 
1,416 
856 
2,056 
2,540 

691 
2,760 
3,601 
1,628 
9,972 

1,216 
649 
3,808 
2,990 
2,983 

1,534 
1,483 
1,626 
2,030 
1,510 

2,857 
586 

6,053 
2,500 
1,729 

3,355 

2,781 
2,366 
2,083 
2,146 

525 
1,075 

2,258 
2,181 
2,890 

3,246 
1,900 

5,945 
962 
1,022 
1,155 
442 
2,364 

256 

7 
8 
10 

13 

21 

18 
22 
27 
9 

14 
11 
6 
9 
16 

4 
13 
14 
6 

14 

6 
7 
16 
16 
10 

13 
14 
11 
6 
8 

fi 

15 
13 
16 

9 
19 
16 
6 
16 

4 
10 
11 
16 
8 

10 

20 
11 

7 

6 

11 

1 

$27,000 
25,  900 
39,  200 

243,  550 
321,  400 

47,640 
88,  575 
180,  900 
21,  300 

110,  175 
13,  200 
12,  715 
25,625 
50,  630 

7,700 
59,850 
85,864 
26,  700 
494,  930 

31,  650 
38,  300 
51,700 
46,  350 
19,  620 

27,975 
29,800 
9,250 
76,000 
37,000 

199,  100 
4,000 

279,  155 
57,  900 
18,875 

241,050 
40,926 
41,290 
7,300 
15,750 

2,850 
15,030 
66,  750 
13,  760 
64,200 

160,  500 
88,700 

1,082,500 
87,  750 
82,  500 
166,425 
21,  700 
208,  000 

1 

3 
1 

3 
2 

$575 
2,360 
78 

1,900 
5,382 

8 
15 
11 

18 
21 

18 
24 
28 
9 

16 
12 
6 
11 
17 

4 
13 
14 
6 
15 

6 
7 
16 
19 
11 

14 
15 
13 
7 
10 

11 
3 

19 
15 
16 

10 
19 
18 

8 
18 

5 
10 
11 
18 
8 

13 
5 

20 
13 

6 
11 

$4,053 
8,825 
8,378 

51,  983 
30,  783 

5,185 
16,481 
41,  337 
6,234 

21,  105 
3,883 
5,489 
11,369 
12,  552 

856 
18,449 
25,008 
12,664 
119,619 

8,656 
7,107 
18,  393 
10,  796 
9,907 

3,416 
7,541 
11,057 
22,426 
5,519 

27,475 
938 

56,  754 
15,  118 
4,665 

45,902 
11,  952 
11,534 
4,481 
5,842 

689 
3,567 
12,932 
4,894 
21,  962 

22,  831 
9,443 

110,338 
10,  473 
8,688 
17,  202 
7,714 
30,  593 

(*) 

8 
15 
10 

16 

17 

13 
22 
27 
9 

14 
9 
6 
10 
15 

4 
13 
14 
6 

13 

6 
5 
16 
15 
10 

9 
14 
9 
7 
9 

11 
3 

16 
15 
15 

10 
19 
13 
8 
18 

4 
10 
11 
12 
8 

12 
4 

20 

11 

5 
12 

617 
1,799 
578 

3,281 
2,139 

1,166 
1,985 
3,781 
783 

1,404 
611 
563 
1,199 
1,092 

362 
1,751 
2,085 
1,264 
5,211 

660 
516 
1,809 
1,283 
1,372 

528 
721 
857 
1,530 
649 

1,254 
127 

3,378 
1,416 
796 

2,103 
1,441 
1,175 
696 
1,027 

207 
634 
1,339 
596 
1,746 

1,899 
816 

4,437 
980 
846 
899 
531 
1,831 

190 

Three  Porks 

Union  __  _ 

Upper    Cumber- 

Warren...  .    

Wayne 

West  Kentucky.  . 
West  Union 

3 
3 
1 

1 
1 
1 
3 

72 
19,  594 
120 

4,800 
800 
110 
6,850 

Whites  Run 

Louisiana: 
Acadia 

Amite  River 

Ascension 

Bayou  Macon  
B  eanregs  rd 

Bienville 

1 
3 

1 
5 

2 
1 
2 
3 

50 
1,199 
500 
53,  600 

3,564 
700 
9,100 
1,181 

Big  Creek 

Bossier  ..    _ 

Caddo 

C  aid  well 

Carey 

Concord 

Deer  Creek 

Eastern  Louisiana 
Everett 

1 

84 

Grand  Cane 

Jackson  

1 
3 

145 
4,140 

Judson  

Liberty 

Louisiana 

2 

13,  450 

Miagee's  Creek 

Morehouse- 
Ouachita      __  _ 

4 
2 

36,  591 
1,810 

Mount  Olive  

New  Orleans 

8 

43,  801 

North  Sabine  
Ouachita 

Red  River 

Sabine 

1 

24 

Shady  Grove  

St.  Tammany  
Tangipahoa  

1 
4 

100 
9,619 

"Vernon 

Washington 

1 

1,527 

Webster 

"Winn 

Maryland: 
Baltimore 

13 
2 

S 
4 
2 
6 

114,323 
12,447 
7,650 
53,  738 
6,400 
18,  941 

Eastern.  _ 

Northern 

Seneca 

Southern 

Western 

Michigan: 
Franklin  

*  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
any  individual  church. 


130 


OF  RELIGIOUS  BODIES,  1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936— Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
chinches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

II 

P 

!* 

| 

^ 

|I 
5a 

g£ 

-s 

I 

•< 

11 

^  S 
3  ft 

gg 

o 

a 
•« 

I! 

J-i  o 

i* 

l 

'o 
ft 

s 

Mississippi* 
Alcorn 

9 
6 
7 
24 
10 

8 
14 
11 

5 

4 

6 
21 
8 
10 
18 

1 
9 

10 
17 

10 
14 
8 
14 
10 

19 
8 
17 
9 
22 

9 
14 
22 
22 
2 

6 

15 
4 
12 
11 

9 

10 
11 
12 
17 

3 
11 

3 

8 

11 

11 
22 
7 
9 
13 

lin  figi 
1  churcl 

1,000 
651 
1,154 
3,377 
1,418 

1,787 
1,740 
1,237 
686 
505 

1,154 
5,055 
1,750 
1,511 
2,785 

251 
1,381 
969 
2,675 
9,561 

1,511 
842 
944 
1,448 
1,900 

4,698 
926 
2,432 
1,096 
6,309 

1,788 
1,551 
7,858 
4,642 
476 

679 
2,647 
950 
2,728 
1,255 

1,550 
1,597 
1,641 
1,026 
2,283 

109 
2,334 

165 
942 

2,070 

1,227 
3,723 
539 
816 
4,957 

ires  on  th 
i. 

8 
6 
5 
22 

7 

7 
10 
10 
4 
3 

5 

19 
8 
9 

17 

$23,  850 
18,  485 
35,  500 
41,  385 
11,  400 

62,  750 
30,  457 
28,100 
3,300 
8,000 

15,800 
174,  989 
12,  195 
89,  600 
115,  475 

2 
2 
1 

$1,  100 
2,865 
1,000 

8 
6 
5 
23 
10 

8 
14 
11 

4 

6 
21 

8 
10 
18 

1 
9 

5 
10 
17 

9 
12 

8 
14 
10 

19 
7 
17 
9 
22 

9 
14 
22 
22 
2 

6 
15 
4 
12 
11 

9 
10 
10 
12 
17 

3 

11 

2 

7 

11 

11 
22 
7 
9 
13 

'  to  a 

$1,  780 
1,874 
9,242 
7,919 
1,666 

11,  590 
5,642 
4,541 
2,032 
5,407 

4,253 
30,  271 
3,365 
15,  215 
17,  677 

(3) 
6,108 
12,  120 
19,  376 
98,  861 

14,  462 
1,282 
7,051 
7,765 
4,425 

27,  371 
4,044 
10,  147 
2,062 
46,  924 

7,905 
7,007 
65,  009 
32,583 
(2) 

828 
5,568 
8,942 
13,  593 
3,699 

6,756 
7,781 
2,450 
1,460 
17,412 

390 
11,  617 

(2) 
1,233 

12,  467 

4,797 
16,455 
716 
2,341 
31,407 

7oid  disclc 

7 
S 
6 
15 
6 

12 
8 

2 

6 
18 
6 
9 
16 

1 
9 
2 
10 
15 

8 
8 
8 
12 

7 

17 

12 
6 
19 

9 
9 
21 
IS 

2 

4 
14 
4 
10 
5 

9 
8 
4 
6 
13 

3 

8 

1 
3 

8 

9 
21 
1 
6 
13 

sing  t 

293 
75 
709 
1,124 
359 

649 
759 
494 
129 
262 

457 
1,933 
550 
798 
1,232 

70 
589 
84 
1,854 
5,318 

609 
312 
620 
615 
420 

2,284 
292 
882 
348 
3,550 

950 
686 
4,479 
2,348 
264 

122 
1,021 
452 
1,597 
259 

684 
821 
199 
232 
1,199 

38 
1,114 

96 
141 

913 

437 
2,111 
71 
253 
2,220 

he  s  tat  Is- 

Benton    

Bolivar 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Chickasaw 

1 

55 

Ottoctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Coldwater 

1 

1 
3 

500 

5,000 
27,  613 

Columbus    _  

Copiah 

Covington   

Deer  Creek 

1 
2 

3,500 
24,630 

Franklin  

George 

Greene 

9 
5 
10 
15 

10 
13 
8 
10 
10 

19 
6 

14 

8 
21 

9 
13 
21 
21 
2 

6 
13 
4 
11 
9 

8 
9 
10 
10 
16 

1 
9 

3 
6 

10 

9 
21 
6 
8 
13 

e  line 

19,  200 
53,  300 
183,  900 
905,  300 

87,  950 
10,  306 
19,  100 
22,  300 
18,  000 

158,  650 
17,  300 
55,  955 
10,  600 
368,  226 

17,  600 
34,  675 
275,  325 
215,  100 
(2) 

6,450 
34,  650 
51,  000 
54,  200 
20,  500 

14,  375 
72,  700 
34,  750 
7,800 
48,  700 

(3) 
74,  700 

11,  100 
7,100 

87,900 

20,550 
89,  050 
5,700 
7,600 
188,  450 

designated 

1 

700 

Grenada 

Gulf  Coast    

3 

4 

1 
1 
1 

47,  180 
224,  500 

7,500 
108 
900 

Hinds-  Warren  
Holmes 

Itawarnba...  

Jackson.  _    _  

Jasper 

Jefferson  Davis— 
Jones  _  

2 

20,  680 

Kemper 

Koscmsko 

Lafayette 

Lauderdale  

3 

46,000 

Lawrence  

Leake  ... 

1 
3 
3 
1 

8,500 
23,  233 
6,  915 
(*) 

Lebanon 

Lee  

Leflore  

Liberty  

Lincoln 

1 
1 

3,000 
3,500 

Madison 

Marion  

Marshall 

Mississippi  

Monroe  

Montgomery  
Mount  Pisgah  
Neshoba 

1 

7,000 

New  Choctaw  
Newton 

2 

18,  050 

Noxubee-Choc- 

taw  

Oktibbeha  

Oktibbena  Coun- 
ty 

1 

2 
1 

4,000 

760 
12,  500 

Panola  

Pearl  River    . 

Pearl  Valley  

Perry  

Pike  

2 

'Con 

63,  656 
ibinations, 

2  Amount  includec 
tics  of  any  individua 

SOUTHERN   BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


131 


TABLE  7* — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


o 
o 

fll 

1 

VA 
CHT7RC 

JLTTE  OP 
H  EDIFICES 

DI 

ca 

an 

5BT  ON 
BEUECH 
DIFICES 

EZPE] 

STDITUEES 

str 

SCI 

NDAY 
IOOL3 

ASSOCIATION 

P)  H 

-1 

c3 
0 
^ 

Number  of 

^Churches 
reporting 

4-S 

! 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

*o 

Mississippi  —  Con. 
Pontotoc 

15 

3,147 

13 

$15,  800 

1 

$8 

15 

$6,  050 

12 

1,043 

Prentiss 

8 

1,677 

7 

41,  750 

8 

6,166 

8 

639 

Rankin 

16 

2,124 

14 

21  350 

16 

6,489 

15 

994 

Riverside 

9 

1,900 

8 

178,  175 

3 

28,  000 

8 

24,  505 

6 

419 

Scott 

13 

1  798 

13 

29,  650 

13 

8,627 

11 

886 

Simpson    __.. 

27 

4,972 

27 

72,400 

2 

5,025 

27 

17,  170 

21 

1,665 

Smith 

20 

3,062 

20 

39,  300 

19 

5,872 

13 

849 

Sunflower    _  _  _ 

9 

1,452 

7 

89,  190 

2 

5,887 

9 

14,  467 

9 

884 

Tallahatchie 

5 

470 

5 

5,655 

5 

1,148 

4 

203 

Tate 

9 

736 

8 

19,  450 

1 

350 

9 

3,210 

8 

361 

Tippah  

17 

2,923 

14 

53,  465 

?, 

85 

17 

10,  928 

13 

1,250 

Tishrvmingn 

15 

1,122 

15 

15,  110 

15 

1,567 

11 

443 

Union  

4 

377 

4 

28,500 

1 

1,500 

4 

1,896 

4 

222 

Union  County  
Walthall 

17 

2,710 
859 

14 
4 

25,  400 
10,500 

1 

1,000 

17 
4 

4,487 
1,873 

13 
3 

633 
359 

Wayne 

13 

1,169 

9 

19,  425 

13 

4,217 

11 

596 

Winston 

12 

2,041 

9 

47,  050 

11 

9,388 

9 

696 

Yalobusha  

13 

1,784 

10 

25,  300 

1 

50 

12 

8,011 

9 

880 

Yazoo  

8 

1,313 

7 

81,  850 

1 

28,  000 

8 

8,535 

6 

444 

Zion 

19 

2,102 

19 

25,  610 

19 

4,554 

12 

743 

Missouri: 
Audrain 

10 

1,433 

10 

63,300 

10 

7,076 

8 

757 

Barry 

17 

1,793 

13 

15,  600 

17 

4,540 

9 

602 

Barton 

4 

227 

4 

8,000 

1 

800 

4 

751 

4 

146 

Bear  Creek  

7 

746 

7 

30,  300 

1 

850 

7 

6,951 

4 

277 

Benton 

8 

585 

7 

22,  800 

8 

4,222 

7 

397 

Bethel 

19 

3,803 

19 

232,  078 

3 

15,  370 

19 

31,  102 

17 

3,190 

Black  River 

12 

1,110 

11 

38,  600 

2 

3,919 

12 

7,030 

10 

894 

Blue  River 

23 

5,059 

23 

271,  336 

5 

11,  736 

22 

48,  640 

23 

3,742 

"Riir}?ois0 

5 

557 

4 

11,  200 

5 

1,209 

5 

218 

Butler  

15 

1,999 

13 

84,  150 

3 

9,130 

15 

14,  065 

15 

1,324 

Caldwell-Ray  
Callaway 

10 
11 

1,797 
1,831 

10 
11 

52,  000 
81,  600 

2 

1,190 

10 
10 

6,391 
10,828 

10 
11 

1,128 
1,007 

namcifvn 

15 

1,614 

11 

19,  314 

1 

65 

14 

2,611 

8 

539 

Cane  Creek 

14 

2,110 

12 

56,225 

2 

935 

12 

10,  718 

12 

1,583 

Cape  Girardeau... 
Cedar 

8 
6 

2,176 
475 

8 
6 

169,  300 
6,150 

3 

80,  392 

8 
6 

21,  466 

785 

8 
6 

1,382 
183 

Charleston  

11 

1,575 

8 

78,500 

2 

2,525 

11 

14,  939 

13 

1,177 

Cherokee 

1 

15 

1 

09 

1 

C2) 

1 

10 

Christian 

11 

1,146 

8 

20,750 

11 

2,838 

10 

596 

Clay 

14 

2,688 

12 

176,  200 

2 

600 

14 

20,  584 

13 

1,604 

Clinton 

282 

2 

(a) 

2 

(3) 

2 

252 

Concord    

26 

5,115 

25 

234,000 

2 

6,750 

26- 

29,767 

24 

3,037 

Cuivre  

11 

1,26C 

11 

36,800 

1 

750 

11 

6,536 

8 

560 

Dade 

e 

692 

5 

10,200 

3,035 

5 

300 

Dallas 

4 

1,004 

2 

(2) 

4 

3,22C 

5 

378 

K 

718 

5 

30,  800 

5 

3,743 

g 

396 

Dent 

7 

1,074 

4 

43,  500 

1,121 

6 

482 

Dixon 

7 

955 

16,025 

7 

3,  36$ 

t 

429 

Eleven    Points 
River 

380 

K 

7,800 

5 

2,317 

± 

218 

Franklin  

21 

4,110 

17 

143,  150 

3 

15,  450 

20 

21,  485 

20 

2,773 

Franklin  County. 

15 
1 

J.HB 

13 

40,  012 

3 

8,300 

14 
1 

12,  193 
(3) 

1: 

1,344 
40 

/T.p     i_v 

11 

1,830 

11 

55,  750 

10 

7,689 

i: 

887 

Greene         

28 

4,987 

27 

156,  100 

j 

12,290 

26 

27,366 

26 

3,105 

TTarTnn-ny 

10 

2,174 

10 

108,  800 

2 

19,940 

10 

17,  511 

9 

1,018 

2  Amount  included  m  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations/*  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statis- 
tics of  any  individual  church. 


275318—41- 


-10 


132 


CENSUS   OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBEK  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936— Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

sl 

gs 

"d 
d 

II 

P 

d  a 

"2 
o 

o 

a 

If 

fl 

| 

la 

i! 

0* 

(5 

Missouri—  Con. 
Howell 

5 

11 
11 
24 
10 

10 
14 
15 
9 

11 

11 
14 
10 

12 
14 

7 
6 
17 
7 
15 

16 
19 
10 

14 
6 

7 
13 
9 
4 
14 

24 
14 
8 
12 
10 

23 

27 
12 
15 
7 

21 
23 
5 
8 
14 

14 
12 
15 
4 
15 
17 

442 

1,514 
1,408 
11,  767 
1,446 

1,866 
2,017 
2,695 
1,314 

2,251 

1,077 
2,449 
746 
1,811 
2,196 

574 
864 
3,449 
339 
1,686 

1,872 
2,982 
685 

1,722 
507 

942 
1,332 
1,074 
659 
1,179 

3,602 
1,927 
683 
1,300 
1,363 

4,126 
15,  416 
1,874 
2,103 
534 

2,087 
4,084 
731 
446 
3,109 

1,437 
693 
1,841 
153 
1,592 
2,545 

5 
11 
11 
22 
9 

9 
12 

14 
9 

9 

11 
13 
7 
12 
12 

R 

e 

14 

7 
14 

16 
15 

8 

,  14 
6 

13 

6 

n 

11 

23 

13 
6 
10 
10 

22 
25 
10 
15 
6 

21 
19 
5 
5 
12 

11 
8 
14 
4 
15 
17 

$15,  700 
47,  060 
56,  500 
1,  060,  568 
46,  900 

83,  250 
89,  900 
50,  550 
79,  000 

228.  950 

25,  250 
109,  100 
27,  150 
53,  100 
103,  600 

14,  000 
13,  650 
122,  900 
13,  100 
84,  300 

84,  700 
75,  640 
16,  500 

48,  800 
14,  500 

50,  200 
14,  150 
38.  300 

28,  850 

78,  800 
31,  550 
7,800 
36,  450 
21,  925 

211,  250 
2,  374,  000 
39,  100 
124,  350 
6,000 

54,900 
159,  000 
48,  500 
6,750 
111,  100 

20,  100 
9,300 
49,  550 
4,550 
49,  700 
118,  170 

4 
11 
11 
24 
10 

10 
14 
14 
9 

11 

11 
12 
10 
12 
14 

7 
5 
15 
6 
15 

16 
19 
9 

14 
6 

7 
13 
9 
4 
12 

24 
14 
7 
11 
10 

23 

27 
12 
15 

7 

21 
23 
5 
8 
14 

13 
10 
15 
4 
15 
17 

$3,  151 
11,  993 
7,213 

176,  145 
7,185 

13,  579 
10,  360 
15,  073 
6,963 

25,  976 

3,235 
17,  860 
3,495 
9,119 
12,  285 

1,741 
2,566 
20,  782 
976 
10,  698 

15,  294 
18,  796 
2,008 

5,125 
1,165 

5,472 
2,738 
9,192 
3,255 
4,114 

11,  775 
7,389 
2,738 
3,601 
4,076 

33,  485 
230,  530 
13,995 
12,  869 
1,936 

9,006 
22,744 
7,134 
1,878 
19,402 

5,008 
1,242 
6,240 
528 
8,003 
11,  228 

3 
9 
9 
24 

8 

10 
13 
14 

9 

9 

11 
12 
8 
12 
14 

6 
5 
13 
6 
12 

15 
19 
8 

11 
5 

7 
11 
7 
2 
12 

20 
13 
6 
10 
10 

21 
26 
11 
14 
6 

20 

21 
4 
7 
14 

11 
7 
15 
4 
13 
16 

294 
1,030 
.  687 
13,  996 
695 

1,410 
1,257 
1,618 
1,094 

973 

652 
1,313 
516 
890 
1,506 

194 
379 
1,805 
201 
785 

922 
1,991 
372 

652 
235 

845 
422 
870 
267 
676 

1,409 
1,122 
390 
656 
797 

2,491 
10,  218 
1,083 
1,162 
367 

1,494 
2,972 
548 
311 
1,636 

817 
290 
881 
101 
857 
1,337 

Jefferson 

1 

$5,  400 

Johnson 

Kansas  City 

17 
1 

308,  701 
4,004 

Laclede     . 

Lafayette 

Lamine 

1 

4,110 

I/awrence 

Linn 

Little   Bonne 

1 

41,  500 

Livingston 

Macon 

1 

3,200 

]V£eramec 

MiUer 

1 
1 

500 
2,950 

Missouri  Valley.  . 
Monroe 

Mount  Moriah.  .  _ 
Mount  Pleasant- 
Mount  Salem  
Mount  Zion 

1 

900 

Nevada 

4 
4 

1,765 
3,367 

New  Madrid  

North  Central 

North    Grand 
River  

1 

550 

North  Missouri... 

Northwest    Mis- 
souri 

1 

1,271 

Old  Path 

Phelps 

Platte 

Pleasant  Grove... 
Polk. 

2 
1 
1 
1 

9,230 
572 
25 
300 

Pulaski  . 

Reynolds 

St.  Glair  

St  Francois 

St.  Joseph  __ 

5 
16 

17,  575 
215,  594 

St.  Louis  

Saline 

Salt  River 

Shannon 

Shoal  Creek  
Spring  River  
Stoddard 

1 
1 

347 
4,500 

Stone 

Tebo 

1 

1,270 

Texas 

Wayne 

Webster..  . 

1 

7,500 

West  Fork 

Wright 

1 
2 

4,250 
1,900 

Wyaconda  i 

3  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  Individual  church. 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


133 


TABLE  7. — NUMBEK  AND  MEMBEKSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936— Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

3gj> 

•§! 

^  o 

sg 

o^ 

1 

1 

$9 

l! 

o  M 

1 

o 

a 

-4 

la 

sl 

g  = 

8 
7 
14 
6 
18 

5 
7 

4 

17 
9 
4 
29 
20 

16 
12 
15 
19 
16 

13 
15 
27 

13 
10 

27 

26 
30 
15 
2 

17 
4 
22 
7 
23 

6 
16 
25 
26 
22 

20 
24 
28 
19 
18 

19 
17 
14 
17 
34 

9 
11 
33 

9 
18 

cd 

53 

O 

1 

II 
fl 

53  ft 

-a  ® 
0 

"o 

1 

New  Mexico: 
Central  

11 
7 
14 
6 
20 

5 

7 
6 

17 
9 
4 
30 
20 

16 
12 
15 
19 
16 

13 
17 
27 

14 
10 

28 

26 
30 
15 
2 

17 
4 
22 
7 
23 

6 
16 
25 
26 
22 

20 
24 
28 
19 
18 

19 
17 
14 
17 
34 

9 
12 
33 
10 
18 

1,126 
630 
1,476 
987 
2,570 

568 
743 
629 

2,941 
436 
439 
2,498 
2,794 

1,633 
2,463 
1,751 
2,523 
3,222 

1,723 
3,073 
8,056 

1,247 
3,398 

5,  382 

4,342 
5,428 
2,783 
430 

4,621 
147 
6,661 
659 
3,325 

993 
4,203 
3,896 
8,254 
3,887 

3,007 
3,752 
9,886 
4,965 
5,269 

2,837 
5,276 
2,421 
1,833 
11,  461 

1,535 
1,411 
6,165 
725 
3,826 

8 
4 
9 
5 
10 

3 

5 
3 

16 
9 
3 

28 
19 

15 
10 
15 
19 
16 

13 
17 
27 

12 
10 

26 

24 
25 
14 
2 

16 
3 
21 
7 
22 

6 
16 
21 
23 
21 

18 
21 
28 
17 
15 

14 
16 
12 
16 
33 

9 

10 
32 
9 

16 

$66,  500 
19,  500 
96,  150 
51,800 
65,  675 

7,875 
29,280 
39,  700 

35,  600 
21,  600 
3,830 
38,  000 
136,  200 

24,990 
49,  700 
27,  100 
47,  700 
40,  900 

22,450 
115,  200 
564,  607 

20,  500 
195,  600 

321,  672 

108,  150 
147,  575 
102,  027 
(»> 

131,  350 
1,920 
346,  300 
5,900 
63,  750 

13,  150 
88,300 
65,  700 
384,400 
113,  625 

122,900 
167,  900 
516,  136 
228,  125 
222,  800 

38,448 
534,  225 
34,000 
37,  300 
863,  977 

28,  457 
15,  800 
223,650 
32,500 
245,  308 

4 
1 
4 

$21,  127 
4,100 
14,  420 

$13,779 
11,  319 
18,  222 
8,901 
26,  109 

7,866 
11,  091 
11,  095 

5,656 
1,456 
1,853 
3,083 
25,445 

3,598 
17,  031 
7,512 
12,  996 
3,454 

6,079 
14,  164 
69,  183 

2,498 
33,  443 

43,  284 

21,  279 
26,  239 
22,  078 
(2) 

20,061 
774 
46,094 
1,829 
14,  300 

2,331 
13,624 
15,  174 
90,697 
15,422 

17,209 
30,222 
74,  579 
43,892 
30,023 

4,793 
80,223 
8,578 
7,711 
138,  576 

10,890 
2,423 
36,297 
3,952 
35,584 

8 
6 
12 
5 
17 

5 
6 
3 

16 
8 
3 
23 
17 

15 
11 
12 
18 
14 

13 
16 
27 

13 

10 

28 

25 
28 
15 
2 

16 
4 
22 
7 
22 

6 
15 
22 
26 
22 

20 
23 
28 
19 
18 

17 
16 
10 
16 
34 

8 
10 
31 

18 

863 
463 
1,228 
725 
1,616 

388 
595 
568 

1,525 
367 
180 
1,367 
1,898 

1,288 
1,805 
1,097 
2,206 
1,456 

1,217 
1,954 
5,933 

972 
3,472 

4,764 

3,577 
3,821 
2,892 
132 

2,493 
176 
4,003 
592 
2,399 

964 
1,859 
2,629 
8,127 
2,324 

2,985 
2,939 
7,329 
4,502 
3,932 

1,595 
4,767 
1,151 
1,316 
9,448 

1,082 
640 
4,398 
410 
2,843 

Lincoln  

Northeastern  
Pecos  Valley 

Portales  

2 

1,556 

Southeastern  
Southwestern  
Tucumcari  

1 
2 

950 
3,300 

North  Carolina: 
Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe  

1 
2 

48 
4,111 

Atlantic  

Avery 

Beulah  

1 
1 
1 

300 
700 
520 

Bladen 

Blue  Ridge  

Brier  Creek 

Brunswick  ._ 

1 
3 

4 

2 
3 

11 

3 
2 
2 

15 
1,574 
327,  550 

150 
7,637 

42,  479 

1,870 
3,200 
1,050 

Brushy  Mountain- 
Buncombe  

Burnt       Swamp 
(Indian) 

Cabarrus 

C  aid  well 

Cape      Fear-Co- 
lumbus 

Carolina  ._ 

Catawba  River- 
Cedar  Grove 

Central 

1 
2 
2 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
11 
3 

4 
1 
5 
3 
2 

500 
21 
50,  000 
84 
1,150 

490 
1,000 
45 
55,  475 
8,656 

5,310 
1.150 
43,  085 
1,533 
1,075 

Cherokee  Indian. 
C  ho  wan 

Dock  

Eastern  _    . 

Elkin 

Flat  River  

French  Broad  

Gaston  

Green  River 

Hay  wood  

Johnston 

Kings  Mountain  . 
Liberty 

Little  River  
!M!acon 

Mecklenburg  
Mitchell 

5 

128,  800 

Montgomery  
Mount  Zion  _ 

Neuse 

1 
6 

1 
1 

1 
1 

124 
101,  384 

1,161 
60 
800 
300 
5,670 

New  Found  
New  South  River. 
Pamlico  

Pee  Dee  _ 

a  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church* 


134 


OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHTTBCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

1 

"o 

•8 

03 

7,214 
10,  924 
5,726 
1,693 
6,256 

6,608 
4,200 
3,196 
6,664 
5,300 

942 
3,137 
3,138 
877 
739 

3,124 
4,449 
2,374 
3,521 
1,471 

2,439 
3,157 
5,615 
720 

1,741 

2,650 
2,095 
843 
60 

60 

285 
3,469 
1,  105 
2,385 
1,147 

2,566 
427 
3,359 
71 

48 

2,594 
2,598 
2,982 
2,842 
1,857 

703 
982 
2,874 
731 
2  i4n 

North  Carolina- 
Continued. 
Piedmont  - 

24 
53 
22 
19 
36 

41 
16 
34 
33 
32 

9 
19 
24 
14 
9 

23 
34 
26 

28 
14 

25 
23 
35 
15 

22 

23 

17 
11 
1 

1 

6 
16 
10 

25 

7 

12 
14 
19 

E 

6 

18 

17 
16 
20 
23 

7 
15 
17 
12 
23 

6,801 
14,  383 
7,129 
1,953 
7,328 

8,002 
4,099 
4,697 
9,389 
6,018 

1,243 
4,199 
3,922 
1,320 
996 

3,892 

7,728 
2,809 
4,487 
2,261 

3,120 
4,501 
9,418 
1,427 

2,962 

4,095 
3,148 
1,356 
104 

140 

321 
6,107 
2,559 
4,076 
1,503 

3.580 
1,155 
5,046 
143 

60 

4,516 
4,380 
3,975 
4,133 
2,450 

962 
1,433 
4,253 
716 
2.782 

23 
50 
21 
17 
36 

34 
16 
33 
32 
32 

8 
17 

21 
12 

7 

21 

28 
18 
26 
12 

18 
22 
34 

14 

19 

22 

16 
11 
1 

1 

3 
14 
10 
18 
6 

10 
12 
14 
4 

3 

14 
15 
12 
17 
14 

6 
12 
16 
6 
20 

$253,  700 
1,  447,  261 
426,  727 
48,  010 
360,  750 

258,  443 
239,  100 
199,  250 
321,840 
418.  906 

17,  150 
124,851 
122,  248 
17,  375 
9,700 

149,  750 
324,  980 
30,  607 
168,  800 
66,500 

68,  400 
144,  400 
416,  800 
14,  700 

86,  950 

407,  500 
61,  250 
39,  400 
0 

C2) 

4,000 
279,  570 
135,  600 
61,  375 
35,  400 

127,  644 
9,280 
303,  000 
1,680 

1,350 

136,  900 
121,  150 
236,  050 
281,075 
94,  200 

26,  800 
15,  100 
188,  875 
14,  050 
48.  475 

5 
13 
3 
3 
6 

2 

7 
4 
6 
9 

2 
3 

6 

$5,491 
347,  335 
42,  900 
2,853 
14,684 

4,800 
24,941 
18,  725 
60,  579 
35,450 

85 
12,  696 
28,  627 

24 
53 
21 
19 
36 

41 
16 
34 
33 
32 

9 
19 
24 
13 

8 

23 
34 
26 

28 
14 

24 
23 
35 
14 

22 

22 

17 
11 
1 

1 

5 
15 
10 
24 
7 

12 
13 
17 
5 

6 

18 
16 
16 
20 
22 

7 
12 
17 
12 
22 

$88,  721 
158,  861 
52,  969 
13,  060 
60,  209 

56,698 
42,  894 
26,  116 
47,  219 
59,  516 

2,857 
34,  769 
14,  859 
2,940 
1,820 

26,  793 
43,804 
6,899 
20,  175 
10,886 

7,118 
22,846 
65,  598 
1,952 

7,996 

41,  217 
10,  696 
2,951 
(2) 

Cz) 

1,160 
54,415 
25,  196 
19,  683 
13,  759 

37,  660 
1,024 
33,899 

717 

337 

50,  013 
25,  355 
53,  766 
46,  221 
14,  222 

4,193 
7,136 
21,  277 
6,316 
16.  225 

24 
52 
17 
16 
34 

41 
16 
32 
31 
29 

9 
18 
23 
13 
9 

23 
33 

25 
28 
13 

22 
23 
35 
13 

22 

22 
14 
11 
1 

1 

6 
14 
8 
22 
6 

11 
13 
16 
3 

4 

16 
16 
14 
18 
20 

7 
12 
17 
12 

OS 

Pilot  Mountain.  _ 
Raleigh 

Randolph 

Roanoke  

Robeson      ._  ... 

Rowan              ... 

Sandy  Creek  

Sandy  Run  _  

South  Fork 

South  Mountain.. 
South  Yadkin.... 
Stanley  _ 

Stone  Mountain,. 
Stony  Fork 

Surry            -  -- 

4 

4,533 

Tar  River 

Tennessee  River.. 
Three  Forks  _ 

3 

1 

1 
2 
6 
1 

2 
3 

28,400 
6,000 

40 
5,631 
39,  096 
28 

15,  350 
4,153 

Transylvania  
Tuckaseigee  - 

Union 

West  Chowan  
West  Liberty  
Western   North 
Carolina 

Wilmington  

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Unassociated  

Ohio: 
Ohio  Valley 

Oklahoma: 
Atoka  

Banner 

5 
5 

44,  573 
44,  840 

"Rp.cTrham 

Bryan 

Caddo  

2 

4 
1 
4 

4,731 

32,  950 
3 
11,080 

Central 

Cherokee  Indian.. 
Chickasaw  Union. 
Chickasha  Indian, 
Choctaw-Chicka- 
saw  (Indian)... 

Comanehe-Cot- 

ton  

3 
3 

7 
5 
3 

1 

24,000 
12,044 
36,  216 
40,  463 
6,700 

150 

Concord-KIowa  
Delaware-Osage.  . 
Enon  

Frisco  

Harmon  . 

Haskell 

Jackson-Oreer  
Latimer 

4 
1 
2 

16,  250 
500 
1.380 

Lenore  

3  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST    CONVENTION 


135 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHTJECH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Oklahoma—Con. 
Mclntosh 

1 
6 
10 
31 

3 
9 

17 
12 
19 

4 

4 
13 
17 
24 
16 

29 
11 
11 
18 

1 

1 

16 
14 

149 
690 
3,249 
6,556 

185 

4,844 
3,660 
1,680 
16,  896 
453 

41 
1,635 
6,838 
6,702 
3,407 

6,859 
1,728 
2,479 
9,008 
1,500 

50 

3,316 
3,438 
3,513 
4,632 
8,276 

1,924 
5,356 
2,373 
4,431 
2,298 

2,360 
645 
7,081 
2,820 
13,  553 

2,169 
3,668 
2,611 
405 
3,488 

8,546 

8,717 
2,162 
2,968 
1,112 

4,450 
1,363 
2,074 

1 
6 
10 
31 

3 

9 
16 
12 
19 

4 

3 
12 
16 
24 
13 

29 
11 
11 
17 
1 

1 

16 
14 
19 
27 
33 

18 
19 
11 
26 
18 

12 

18 
9 
33 

12 
22 
11 

i 

14 
31 
24 

(2) 
$5,041 
28,  998 
51,  322 

1,151 

51,  530 
29,  100 
14,  983 
181,962 
1,237 

107 
14.  315 
67,  358 
67,  595 
23,  320 

57,  487 
19,063 
17,475 
60,952 
(2) 

(2) 

21,  198 
18,849 
27,  762 
19,  586 
44,002 

6,488 
57,  301 
18,495 
15,  407 
13,  764 

11,  118 
1,954 
84,  890 
25,  501 
120,  387 

9,790 
22,086 
11,  013 
1,150 
24,509 

52,  391 

47,632 
10,  835 
16,  792 
2,132 

25,465 
10,  742 
6,121 
66,684 
31,695 

1 
6 
10 
30 

3 

9 

16 
9 
19 
4 

3 
13 

17 
23 
14 

26 
11 
9 
18 

75 
370 
1,884 
4,323 

157 

3,750 
2,750 
1,252 
10,  133 
171 

30 
1,140 
6,104 
4,459 
2,439 

4,823 
1,408 
1,441 
7,540 

Mills  

4 
9 

24 

3 

9 
15 
11 
16 
4 

3 

12 
15 
22 
11 

28 
11 
10 
15 

$21,  600 
100,  635 
242,  822 

4,500 

190,  000 
114,  800 
59,  400 
648,010 
7,100 

2,050 
59,  000 
439,  550 
441,  150 
115,  950 

266,  825 
52,807 
140,250 
240,  750 

1 
3 
6 

1 

3 

1 
1 
9 

$3,  000 
9,443 
55,  025 

34 

22,  300 
8,000 
250 
109,  277 

Mullins  

Muskogee.  _- 

Muskogee-Semi- 
nole-  Wichita.  ._ 

North  Canadian.. 
Northeastern  
Northwestern  
Oklahoma 

Oklahoma  Indian  . 

Old  Choctaw  and 
Chickasaw 

Panhandle 

4 
8 
7 
2 

12 
2 
4 
11 

9,750 
66,  145 
51,  607 
14,  800 

50,  325 
590 
30,  142 
64,  391 

Pawnee  Creek  
Perry  

Pittsburg  _    __  . 

Pottawatomie- 
Lincoln 

Salt  Fork  Valley. 
Tillman..      

Tulsa  Rogers  
Unassociated  

Pennsylvania: 
Northern 

1 

16 
14 

19 
25 

28 

16 
18 
11 
26 
17 

11 
17 
30 

11 
21 
11 
3 
13 

29 

23 
15 
15 
5 

13 
t 

29 
12 

(3) 

139,650 
116,  750 
130,  500 
120,  050 
136,500 

28,450 
397,575 
144,  150 
103,600 
42,  818 

67,  500 
16,000 
552,  200 
123,  500 
528,  348 

66,050 
143,  000 
31,600 
8,000 
141,300 

224,  150 

267,  500 
96,500 
104,900 
6,300 

72,200 
35,000 
27,  700 
308,775 
119,000 

1 

15 
13 
18 
25 
31 

18 
19 
11 
25 
17 

12 
6 
17 
9 
33 

11 
21 
11 
4 
14 

30 

22 
14 
17 
) 

2( 
& 

68 

2,549 
2,034 
2,164 
2,945 
5,340 

1,860 
3,791 
1,869 
2,632 
1,457 

1,129 
355 
6,089 
2,259 
10,357 

1,023 
2,484 
1,581 
266 
2,463 

5,815 

5,249 
1,359 
2,  225 
388 

3,242 
873 
869 
8T334 
2,291 

South  Carolina: 
Abbeville 

Aiken 

1 

e 
] 

1 

3 

1,790 
1,700 
9,783 
1,000 

50 
127,  271 

Barnwell  

19 

27 
33 

18 
20 
11 

Beaverdam  

Broad  River  

Carolina 

Charleston 

Chester 

Chesterfield 

26 
18 

12 

18 
9 
33 

12 
22 
1] 

Colleton       . 

1 
1 

900 
1,409 

Edgefield 

Edisto 

Fairfield  

5 
1 
10 

1 

f 

97,  800 
300 
123,  246 

200 
9,625 

Florence     

Green  ville..  

Kershaw  

Laurens  

X  exington 

3VC  arion 

Moriah 

14 

1 
3 

3,500 
2,759 

10,  950 
3,000 
334 

North  Greenville. 
North    Spartau- 
burg 

31 

24 
16 
17 
< 

2< 

i 

Orangeburg 

i 

16 
17 
6 

2C 

3! 
13 

Pee  Dee 

1 

Pickens 

Piedmont.     

2 

268 

Reedy  River 

Ridge 

Saluda  

11,645 
3,403 

12,022 
23,615 

Santee  

ia 

2  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


136 


CENTOS'   OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MBMBBBSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITUBES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

r<33 

"o 

South     Carolina— 
Continued. 
Savannah  River-. 
Southeast  _. 

25 
24 
25 

15 
11 

20 
17 
14 

33 

1 
21 
31 
14 

9 
2 
21 
13 
31 

27 
16 
7 
17 
33 

17 
12 
22 
3 

7 

29 
9 
27 
17 
6 

45 
21 
6 
19 

4 

45 
20 
17 
14 
36 

18 
_17 
27 
24 
20 

11 
23 
12 
48 
20 

3,880 
3,302 
8,590 

2,718 
3,520 

3,148 
4,932 
4,416 

3,622 

240 
4,277 
4,398 
2,468 

1,662 

524 
1,985 
2,088 
7,058 

4,671 
3,047 
1,235 
2,787 
3,962 

2,298 
1,616 
3,111 
765 
590 

6,157 
1,030 
4,097 
2.521 
434 

10,  279 
3,207 
461 
3,088 
422 

18,  866 
2,682 
5,065 
1,361 
6,123 

1,541 
2,066 
4,156 
14,  591 
2,311 

1,981 
3,196 
1,415 
16,  019 
2,  9261 

21 
23 
24 

14 

$128,  350 
175,  100 
644,  125 

32,  250 
239,  425 

112,200 
350,  100 
272,  526 

70,  775 
(2) 
232,275 
98,  875 
119,  565 

97,  000 

17,920 
46,  COO 
205,  215 

51,  125 
166,  450 
49,  500 
181,800 
28  575 

1 

V 

$400 
14,  200 
67,  508 

24 
24 
25 

14 
11 

19 
17 
14 

32 

1 
21 
29 
14 

9 

19 
13 
31 

26 
16 
7 
17 
31 

17 
12 
21 
3 
7 

29 
9 

27 
17 
6 

45 
20 
5 
18 

4 

45 
20 
17 
13 
35 

18 
16 
27 
24 
15 

11 
23 
9 
48 
20 

$20,  408 
24,  83S 
85,  854 

5,148 
33,  547 

21,  273 
70,  556 
36,958 

8,597 
(2) 
27,  242 
12,  676 
16,  798 

13,  115 
(2) 
3,771 
11,478 
33,  055 

28,  541 
18,  976 
5,625 
22,  779 
3,206 

16,  080 
5,218 
14,  497 
8,190 
3,134 

31,015 
3,625 
7,207 
10,  176 

487 

76,719 
9,824 
741 
16,871 
607 

246,  745 
9,865 
47,  160 
6,748 
24,965 

3,352 
2,688 
2,938 
235,  769 
4,152 

7,576 
7,794 
990 
202,  542 
7,943 

21 
20 
24 

14 
9 

19 
16 
14 

25 
1 
21 
30 
13 

8 
5 
18 
13 
30 

27 
16 
7 
16 
24 

16 
10 
22 
3 

7 

29 
9 
25 
12 
5 

43 
21 
4 
19 
3 

45 
17 
17 
10 
34 

14 
16 
22 
23 
16 

11 
23 

7 
48 
19 

2,004 
1,930 
6,526 

1,247 
2,368 

2,822 
3,879 
3,268 

1,552 
25 
2,142 
2,899 
1,345 

1,009 
190 
1,112 
1,022 
4,029 

3,162 
1,686 
706 
1,618 
1,449 

1,430 
829 
1,759 
711 
314 

3,455 
504 
1,862 
784 
291 

6,552 
1,624 
184 
2,134 
130 

13,  294 
1,419 
3,176 
715 
3,603 

636 
1,173 
1,383 
12,  192 
1,048 

882 
2,111 

427 
10,873 
1,681 

Spartan  _-_ 

Twelve    Mile 
River 

Union..  . 

8 

20 

16 
12 

29 
1 
20 
25 
13 

9 
1 
12 
12 
29 

21 
16 
7 
16 
25 

16 
12 
18 
1 
6 

28 
9 
26 
14 
3 

42 
17 
4 
18 
4 

41 
19 
16 
13 
32 

16 
13 
22 
22 
11 

11 
20 
9 
46 
19 

1 

125 

Waccamaw 

Welsh  Neck  

1 

2 

20,  189 
11,  000 

80 

York  

Tennessee: 
Beech  River 

Benton 

Beulah  _,  _ 

1 
4 
3 

2 

40,  000 
845 
995 

1,690 

Big  Emory  

Big  Hatchie    . 

Bledsoe 

Blood  River 

Campbell 

Carroll  

2 

4 

1 
3 
1 
2 

1,395 
8,180 

20 
62,  786 
7,000 
1,717 

Chilhowie  - 

Clinton. 

Concord 

Crockett  

Cumberland.  .  ._ 

Cumberland  Gap, 
Duck  River 

112,  600 
35,300 
80,050 
C2) 
9,700 

209,  183 
18,444 
46,  115 
35,000 
4,150 

511,  444 
64,  697 
3,350 
127,  700 
3,650 

1,  494,  382 
73,  700 
252,842 
42,  900 
113,  950 

13,  190 
29,  352 
22,  800 
1,  199,  000 
33,810 

30,800 
49.  125 
12  100 
583,025 
54,  275 

2 
3 

1 

2,573 
3,182 
8 

Dyer 

East  Tennessee  ... 
East  Union 

Fayette.      _    _. 

1 
3 

25 
10,559 

Gibson  

Giles 

Grainger 

1 
1 

50 
1,000 

Hardeman 

Hlawassee 

Holston.  _. 

6 

114,  669 

Holston  Valley... 
Indian  Creek  
Jefferson 

1 

17 

Jtidson 

Knox 

14 
2 
3 
2 

5 

1 

196,  364 
10,  035 
51,  491 
1,070 
4,768 

32 

Lawrence 

Madison 

Maury. 

McMinn  

McNairy  ...    _ 

Midland 

Mulberry  Gap... 
Nashville  

16 
1 

302,  575 
6,885 

New  River  

New  Salem      * 

Nolachucky  
Northern 

1 
1 
14 
2 

34 
1,500 
85,  142 
2,800 

Ocoee  

Polk  

*  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statis- 
ics  of  any  individual  church. 


SOUTHERN   BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


137 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHUKCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAT 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

1 

o 

Tennessee—  -Con. 
Providence 

13 
20 
16 
16 

8 

31 

28 
5 

9 

11 

13 
27 

17 
9 
28 

15 
18 
U 
15 

26 
8 
23 
13 
19 

13 
19 
20 
10 
9 

5 
10 
8 
11 
17 

8 
18 
25 
10 
19 

10 
15 
15 

8 
28 

24 
13 
21 

8 
8 

9 

16 
20 
14 

1,393 
1,832 
4,182 
2,032 
1,419 

5,028 
16,  294 
461 

1,299 
1,045 

1,612 
3,738 

1,619 
1,220 
4,  61-0 

1,796 
2,716 
1,543 
3,074 

4,809 
1,493 
4,675 
3,097 
2,102 

1,651 
2,040 
2,320 
1,241 
2,621 

530 
1,223 
955 
858 
2,408 

1,441 
1,727 
4,391 
1,944 
1,933 

3,134 
2,809 
3,484 
1,590 
4,961 

19,860 
2,056 
4,296 
1,290 
1,649 

2,661 
2,920 
3,348 
2,535 
1,870 

10 
11 
15 
14 

7 

27 
27 
4 

9 

8 

8 
25 

15 
8 
26 

14 
15 
11 
15 

16 
6 
20 
11 
16 

11 
18 
13 
9 

8 

5 
10 

E 

9 

15 

8 
13 
23 
9 
13 

9 
14 
13 
8 
25 

23 
12 
20 
6 

8 

8 
14 
15 
14 
23 

$14,  546 
11,221 
165,  100 
38,  350 
38,  000 

65,  089 
966,  087 
2,825 

8,150 
12,  575 

39,  750 
51,227 

54,  550 
21,  000 
71,450 

21,  100 
175,  779 

3MOO 
105,  450 

353,  350 
58,  200 
216,400 
158,950 
97,  950 

26,350 
33,900 
42,300 
78,  800 
125,  000 

14,200 
30,  700 
29,000 
11,700 
169,050 

43,  825 
27,400 
162,396 
163,  500 
36,900 

406,645 
74,423 
195,  400 
36,500 
166,  250 

1,011,513 
164,  850 
164,950 
37,200 
84,500 

303,800 
70,700 
178,600 
121,  200 
94,  300 

12 
18 
16 
16 
8 

27 
28 
5 

9 
11 

13 

26 

17 
9 
27 

15 
18 
11 
15 

25 
7 
23 
13 
19 

13 
19 
20 
9 
9 

5 
10 
8 
11 
17 

8 
18 
25 
10 
18 

9 
14 
15 

8 
27 

24 
13 
21 

7 
8 

9 

16 
19 
14 
25 

$2,  174 
3,961 
30,  841 
7,518 
8,330 

9,591 
219,  713 
427 

1,008 
2,968 

5,791 
7,295 

5,249 
6,029 
15J48 

4,170 
16,  103 
5,0,16 
12,  996 

55,  367 
10,  662 
40,  259 
34,888 
19,  676 

10,  194 
8,005 
17,  462 
10,910 
13,854 

2,208 
6,730 
10,  077 
2,595 
17,  101 

8,551 
8,114 
24,440 
33,  930 
10,  687 

50,  532 
15,  050 
57,  969 
12,  405 
43,  861 

209,  030 
26,  789 
33,  022 
7,151 
13,630 

54,  088 
19,  161 
24,914 
12,202 
23,881 

13 
16 
16 
16 
8 

29 
26 

7 

4 
9 

12 
26 

15 
9 
25 

13 
14 
10 
15 

23 
7 
22 
13 
16 

13 
18 
18 
8 
8 

3 

8 
7 

8 
14 

7 
17 
24 
10 
17 

10 
13 
14 
8 
26 

23 
13 
21 

7 

12 
17 
13 
25 

1,042 
980 
2,760 
983 
1,124 

2,423 
9,275 
740 

150 
551 

878 
1,956 

1,108 
723 
2,194 

722 
1,254 
732 

1,348 

3,282 
1,100 
3,351 
2,554 
1,619 

1,057 
Ir547 
1,768 
768 
1,311 

210 
863 
692 
386 
1,432 

949 
1,267 
2,793 
1,235 
1,278 

2,069 
1,833 
2,750 
1,034 
3,229 

14,  542 
1,399 
3,294 
775 
1,209 

2,462 
1,411 
2,000 
1,185 
3,077 

Riverside 

1 
2 
1 
1 

$1,000 
2,300 
75 
2,250 

Robertson  

Salem 

Sequatchie  Valley 
Sevier 

Shelby 

13 

255,332 

South  Union 

Southwestern 
District 

1 

50 

Stewart..  

Stone  

1 

4,500 

Sweetwater 

Tennessee     Val- 
ley     

1 
2 

4 

12,000 
5,707 
4,134 

Union 

Watauga  

Weakley 

Western  District- 
William  Carey,.. 
Wilson 

2 

4 
2 

2 

4 
4 

4,100 

71,765 
3,780 
20,  512 
35,  249 
29,837 

Texas: 
Austin 

Baylor-Knox  

Bell       ..      . 

Big  Springs 

Blanco 

Brady 

Brown 

2 
1 
1 
2 

800 
150 
17,000 
8,040 

Brownfleld 

Burleson-Lee  
Burleson,  R.  C... 

Burnet-Llano  
Callahan 

1 

11,000 

Canadian 

Cherokee 

Cisco  

2 

3,433 

Clay 

nnlfi"nifl,"n 

1 
1 
2 
1 

3 
1 
7 
2 
3 

14 
3 
1 

475 
6,000 
13,  250 
3,050 

68,290 
1,130 
22,560 
777 
18,400 

217,  315 
34,908 
42,000 

Collin  

Colorado 

Comanche     

Concho  Valley--. 
Cooke 

Corpus  Christi... 
Corsicana 

Creath-Brazos  

Dallas.  

Del  Rio  Uvalde-  _ 
Denton         

Dickens 

Ellis 

El  Paso         

3 

82,625 

Enon 

Erath 

Falls 

1 

29,900 

Fannin 

25 

138 


GEN'S'TJS'   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHUBCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

CD  ^ 

O  "P 

t-<  s 

3ft 

gg 

1 

gM 

si 

2  ft 

gg 

| 

-4 

Sfl 

ft 

O  * 

40 
| 

< 

SM 

fs 

H  p< 

O  *"* 

§ 

0 

Texas—  Con. 
Fisher 

13 
14 
6 
7 
16 

25 
9 
9 
3 
6 

5 
7 
16 
26 
7 

14 
9 
17 
15 
12 

15 
2 
20 
13 
16 

9 
10 
12 
5 
20 

8 
19 
4 
16 
12 

11 
8 
12 
21 
18 

23 

14 

23 
39 

11 

9 
16 

14 
9 

7 

30 
14 
6 
13 
22 

15 
30 
11 
5 
22 

1,860 
2,321 
562 
1,058 
2,044 

8,649 
776 
1,359 
228 
1,150 

1,125 
1,434 
4,002 
6,863 
554 

3,091 
1,540 
3,380 
1,962 
1,542 

2,217 
162 
3,678 
4,234 
6,282 

1,512 
1,304 
1,478 
644 
3,171 

928 
2,340 
307 

2,724 
6,448 

1,380 
631 
2,173 

3,058 
2,780 

4,563 
4,254 

5,461 
5,476 
1,840 

1,437 
3,249 
1,872 
1,440 
2,150 

14,988 
2,822 
900 
1,999 
5,564 

4,068 
11,952 
2,811 
330 
6,653 

9 
11 

4 
5 
15 

24 
9 
7 
3 
6 

4 
4 
14 
21 
7 

13 
9 
17 
9 

12 

12 
2 
15 
13 

12 

8 
7 
9 
5 
16 

6 
15 
2 
15 
10 

7 
7 
8 
18 
14 

23 

12 

18 
35 
10 

8 
16 
14 
7 
6 

28 
12 
5 
10 
21 

14 
26 
8 
2 
18 

$16,  550 
57,  200 
16,  800 
26,  135 
76,630 

378,  266 
19,  850 
52,  450 
2,600 
39,400 

41,000 
90,  600 
190,  200 
188,  450 
7,950 

96,250 
29,  300 
205,  975 
31,  350 
25,  800 

122,  700 

183,  770 
307,  497 
198,  409 

61,  650 
31,  950 
47,  126 
19,  600 
136,  400 

36,  800 
93,050 
(a) 
76,  700 
833,700 

26,800 
16,650 
107,  860 
100,  700 
127,895 

184,000 
98,800 

233,  700 
103,090 
79,800 

44,900 
141,350 
30,600 
52,000 
125,000 
729,249 
332,050 
33,  100 
48,000 
258,250 

207,  200 
684,902 
159,800 

233,200 

13 
14 
6 
7 
16 

25 
9 
9 
3 
6 

5 
7 
16 
25 
6 

13 
9 
17 
15 
10 

15 
2 
20 
13 
16 

9 
10 
12 
5 
20 

8 
17 
4 
16 
12 

11 
8 
10 
20 
18 

23 

14 

21 
38 
11 

9 
16 
13 
9 

7 

29 
14 
6 
13 
22 

14 
29 
11 
5 
22 

$9,  959 
17,  557 
5,387 
9,353 
22,670 

62,  398 
4,399 
8,322 
722 
8,739 

7,515 
6,593 
30,  769 
39,  343 
1,860 

24,674 
8,258 
28,  149 
16,  253 
7,102 

13,  467 
(2) 
20,  337 
47,746 
49,  656 

14,422 
6,040 
8,026 
4,211 
23,  650 

5,324 
15,  006 
1,125 
23,986 
93,  202 

5,061 
3,494 
12,661 
16,  427 
49,  381 

27,294 
26,  631 

40,370 
24,  356 
28,  440 

10,  944 
23,  852 
13,  710 
10,  689 
17,  416 
145,  749 
29,  289 
10,765 
8,373 
65,  919 
46,  515 
127,  351 
31,  282 
1,875 
58,  598 

8 
13 
5 
5 
15 

25 
8 
6 
3 
5 

4 
6 
16 
23 
6 

12 
8 
16 
13 
10 

13 
1 
17 
13 
13 

7 
8 
11 
5 
19 

6 
17 
4 
15 
11 

10 
7 
8 
17 
14 

19 
12 

20 
35 

11 

6 
14 
13 
8 
6 
27 
12 
5 
11 
21 
14 
28 
10 
3 
21 

932 
1.827 
361 
591 
1,368 

6,046 
501 
708 
129 
398 

660 
619 
2,429 
3,702 
332 

1,723 
780 
1,923 

1,778 
707 

1,463 
26 
1,927 
2,743 

3,854 

1,196 
728 
761 
452 
2,305 

600 
1,562 
230 
2,071 
4,859 

741 
506 
1,248 
1,  633 
2,378 

2,015 
2,643 

3,302 
3,343 
1,364 

596 
2,049 
1,030 
955 
1,584 

8,997 
2,249 
390 
878 
3,285 

2,605 
8,768 
1,767 
120 
4,791 

Floyd 

2 

1 

$5,800 
400 

Freestone  Leon  
Gambrell 

Gonzales  

3 

3 
2 

1 

1,105 

9,032 
1,300 
2,500 

Grayson..       

Guadalupe  . 

Hamilton     .  

Hardin 

Harmony 

Haskell 

Henderson 

Hill 

3 
3 

9,426 
6,970 

Hunt 

Jack 

Johnson..  

1 
2 
1 
3 
1 

1 

10,000 
3,600 
20,000 
2,900 
250 

15,000 

Jones    

Lamar  — 

Lamesa~  _ 

Jvampq,<?as 

Leon  River 

Liberty 

Limestone 

2 
7 
3 

1 

18,000 
105,990 
50,400 

5,500 

Lower  Bio  Grande. 
Lubbock 

Medina  River  
Meridian 

Milam 

Mills 

Mitchell-Scurry.  . 
Montague-Wise.  . 
Neches  River  
New  Bethel 

2 
1 
2 

21,  300 

100 
3,530 

North  Fork.  

8 
6 

2 

11,  783 
183,052 

5,220 

PaloDuro  

jpalo  Pinto 

Paluxy 

Panhandle  

4 

25,  600 

Parker  ... 

Pecos  Valley     _.. 

4 

4 
4 

6 

5 
1 

2,950 

5,850 
4,058 

21,  295 
1,930 
1,300 

Pittsburg  

Red  Fork 

Bed    Ri  ver- 
Texarkana  

Rehoboth...    __. 

Rio  Grande  

Robertson  

Runnells  

2 
2 

1 
3 
14 
2 
1 
1 
5 

4 
11 
1 

515 
4,600 
6,800 
14,579 
154,  115 
102,875 
3,000 
125 
25,940 
7,375 
173,  579 
24,000 

Rusk-Panola  

Sabine  Valley  

Saline  

San  Antonio  
San  Marcos  _  „ 

SanSaba  . 

Shelby-Doches... 
Smith  

Soda  Lake  „. 

Southeast  Texas.  _ 
Staked  Plains.... 
Stonewall,-  

Sweetwater  

4 

54,248 

a  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations/*  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


SO'TTTHEBSr   BAPTIST   CONVENTION 


139 


TABLE  7. — NUMBEK  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OP  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

1 
"8 

1 
£ 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

I 
1 

Churches 
reporting 

1 

Texas—  Con. 
Tarrant    

32 

12 
16 
5 
27 

42 
13 
11 
36 
14 

13 
7 
13 
20 

11 
12 
39 
23 
17 

33 
5 
36 
1 
23 

48 
32 
15 
16 
33 

25 

28 

18 
20 

30 
25 
32 
53 
12 

46 
16 
27 
41 
45 

22 
i 

1 
« 

13,545 

2,357 
3,187 
857 
3,272 

24,  345 
3,381 
1,725 
13,  134 
2,827 

4,276 
1,522 
2,354 
1,937 

1,531 
3,686 
7,523 
5,209 
5,029 

4,377 
486 
6,262 
60 

5,887 

21,  773 
7,591 
2,980 
2,460 
5,275 

7,226 
209 
2,142 
1,651 
8,360 

6,355 
4,309 
7,573 
8,912 
1,055 

9,894 
2,813 
3,265 
8,875 
14,  472 

9,787 
1,098 
97 

1,209 
759 
508 

30 

10 
8 
4 
23 

39 
11 
10 
35 
10 

11 
7 
13 
17 

11 
11 
37 
22 

17 

33 
33 

$584,  321 

73,  300 
272,  500 
28,500 
91,800 

1,  953,  675 
123,000 
46,  385 
531,900 
78,  600 

177,  241 
69,  400 
102,950 
64,  775 

124,  000 
156,417 
276,  184 
446,  450 
268,  500 

232,441 
14,  000 
191,  200 

14 

$94,  183 

32 

12 
15 
5 
26 

42 
13 
11 
36 
14 

13 
7 
13 
20 

10 
12 
39 
23 
17 

33 

5 
36 
1 
23 

48 
32 
15 
16 
33 

25 
2 

24 
17 
20 

30 
24 
32 
53 
12 

46 
16 
27 
41 
45 

22 

»5 

1 

r 
] 

$126,  287 

20,455 
25,  521 
7,859 
30,964 

306,  617 
22,  707 
17,  167 
122,869 
16,  111 

39,  594 
12,  607 
13,600 
9,254 

14,  999 

34,  191 
49,  495 
68,861 
52,  637 

29,  101 
389 
37,442 
(2) 
22,  228 

357,  908 
47,  337 
14,041 
10,  712 
30,  445 

75,  873 

22,029 
8,809 
107,  023 

106,648 
21,  184 
69,003 
95,763 
4,008 

61,099 
32,  668 
15,  551 
103,  716 
162,  599 

126,  324 
7,715 
(2) 

(2) 

8 

96,933 

31 

11 
12 
4 
21 

37 
12 
9 
35 
12 

11 
6 
11 
19 

10 
12 
38 
21 
17 

32 
5 
35 
1 
22 

48 
31 
14 
15 
30 

25 
1 
26 
15 
19 

27 
24 
31 
51 
12 

46 
14 
23 
38 
43 

22 
t 

1 

o 

] 
] 

8,506 

1,702 
2,054 

477 
1,841 

18,465 
2,196 
759 
9,594 
2,112 

3,059 
1,148 
1,275 
1,353 

1,390 
1,960 
5,156 
3,898 
3,301 

3,932 
336 
4,015 
35 
2,116 

14,  132 
3,574 
1,583 
1,465 
3,444 

6,060 
106 
2,316 
1,048 
7,933 

4,560 
2,283 
5,  622 
6,431 
885 

6,058 
2,017 
1,451 
6,239 
13,453 

7,718 
647 
110 

863 
547 
525 

Throckmorton- 
Young 

Tierra  Blanca  
Trans-Canadian.. 
Tryon-E  vergreen  . 

Union  

3 

1 
3 

21 
2 

56,200 
1,846 
309 

504,  703 
359 

Unity 

Van  Zandt 

Waco  

6 
2 

5 
1 
2 
1 

4 
4 
4 
4 
3 

4 

18,050 
14,  500 

24,044 
800 
18,  600 
125 

4,200 
13,  125 
19,  737 
94,  150 
6,300 

4,136 

West  Plains 

Wichita-Archer... 
Wilbarger-Foard  . 
Williamson 

Wise 

Virginia: 
Accomac  _ 

Albemarle.  -    _ 

Appomattox  

Augusta  

Blackwater 

Blue  Ridge 

Clinch  Valley  
Concord           

5 

11,276 

Cumberland  Gap. 
Dan  River 

23 

47 
29 
14 
16 
29 

24 
f 

22 

15 
20 

30 
24 
32 
51 
11 

44 
15 
25 
39 
44 

20 
5 

125,  500 

2,  349,  967 
159,  900 
91,  500 
50,  100 
208,250 

453,  500 

140,  900 
79,090 
748,  500 

739,  100 
131,  500 
367,700 
530,  850 
21,  750 

322,200 
309,  000 
77,650 
769,  250 
1,136,936 

705,  700 
54,210 
(*) 

(2) 

(2) 
(2) 

477,  750 

Dover  

16 
3 

355,  649 
4,670 

Goshen 

Werrnon 

James  River  

1 
3 

9 

125 
2,600 

80,  591 

Lebanon  

Middle  District- 
Mulberry  Gap__. 
New  Lebanon  
New  River 

2 

11,  350 

Peninsula 

7 
7 

79,038 
150,  581 

Petersburg  

Pie(?TnnT)t 

Pittsylvania  
Potomac 

3 
10 
1 

3 
3 

17,871 
128,505 
600 

4,135 
72,900 

Powell  River  

Rappahannock.  _  _ 
Shenandoah  

Shiloh 

Strawberry  

11 
11 

13 

2 
1 

1 

88,  198 
391,  166 

85,725 
5,840 
(2) 

(2) 

Valley      

Virginia-Ports- 
mouth   

Wise         

Unassociated  

West  Virginia: 
New  Lebanon  
Shenandoah  
Valley 

1 

(2) 
32,929 

Combinations  

F  2  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations/'  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church* 


140  CENS'US'   OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 

DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

At  the  time  of  the  formation  of  the  Triennial  Convention  in  1814  2  the  Baptist 
population  was  chiefly  in  New  England  and  the  middle  and  southern  seaboard 
States,  and  the  center  of  executive  administration  was  located  first  at  Philadelphia 
and  subsequently  at  Boston.  With  the  growth  of  migration  to  the  South  and 
Southwest,  the  number  of  churches  in  those  sections  of  the  country  greatly 
increased,  and  it  became  difficult  to  associate  in  a  single  advisory  council  more 
than  a  small  percentage  of  the  Baptist  churches  in  the  United  States,  especially 
as  means  of  transportation  were  deficient  and  expensive.  At  the  same  time  the 
question  of  slavery  occasioned  much  discussion  between  the  two  sections,  which 
was  brought  to  a  focus  by  the  impression  in  the  Southern  States  that  the  foreign 
mission  society  of  the  denomination,  which  had  its  headquarters  in  Boston,  was 
so  thoroughly  antislavery  that  it  would,  not  accept  a  slaveholder  as  a  missionary. 
A  letter  addressed  direct  to  that  organization  by  the  Alabama  State  Convention, 
asking  for  information,  brought  a  courteous  reply  to  the  effect  that  while  the 
board  refused  to  recognize  the  claim  of  anyone,  slaveholder  or  nonslaveholder, 
to  appointment,  "one  thing  was  certain,  they  could  never  be  a  party  to  any 
arrangement  which  would  imply  approbation  of  slavery." 

This  decision  led  to  formal  withdrawal  of  the  various  Southern  State  conventions 
and  auxiliary  foreign  mission  societies  and  to  the  organization  at  Augusta,  Ga., 
in  May  1845,  of  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention.  About  300  churches  were 
represented  by  delegates  from  Maryland,  Virginia,  North  Carolina,  South 
Carolina,  Georgia,  Alabama,  Louisiana,  and  Kentucky,  the  largest  number  of 
Baptist  churches  in  the  South  at  that  period  being  in  Virginia.  In  all  the  discus- 
sions and  in  the  final  act  of  organization,  there  was  very  little  bitterness,  the 
prevalent  conviction  being  that  those  of  kindred  thought  would  work  more  effec- 
tively together,  and  that,  in  view  of  the  sharp  differences  between  the  two  sections, 
it  was  wiser  that  separate  organizations  should  exist.  The  specific  purpose  of 
the  convention,  as  plainly  set  forth,  was  to  carry  out  the  benevolent  purposes  of 
those  composing  it;  to  elicit,  combine,  and  direct  the  energies  of  the  denomination 
for  the  propagation  of  the  Gospel;  and  to  cooperate  for  the  promotion  of  foreign 
and  domestic  missions  and  other  important  objects,  while  respecting  the  independ- 
ence and  equal  rights  of  the  local  churches. 

Previous  to  the  Civil  War  the  convention  met  biennially;  since  that  time,  for 
the  most  part,  it  has  met  annually.  At  first,  its  efforts  were  largely  given  over 
to  foreign  missions,  under  the  direction  of  the  Foreign  Mission  Board  at  Richmond, 
Va.,  and  to  home  ("domestic")  missions  under  the  direction  of  the  Home  Mission 
Board  located  first  at  Marion,  Ala.,  and  later  at  Atlanta,  Ga.,  although  a  number 
of  the  cooperating  State  Conventions  were  fostering  schools  and  colleges  of  various 
types.  The  Home  Mission  Board,  from  the  first,  moreover,  gave  its  most  earnest 
consideration  and  its  largest  help  to  the  mission  work  carried  on  in  the  several 
States,  notably  in  the  States  where  Baptists  were  weak.  From  1845  onward, 
therefore,  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention  fostered  foreign  missions,  home 
missions,  and  State  missions. 

In  1859  the  Southern  Baptist  Theological  Seminary,  now  at  Louisville,  Ky.,  be- 
gan work;  in  addition  to  this  seminary  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention  now  owns 
and  controls  the  Southwestern  Baptist  Theological  Seminary,  at  Fort  Worth, 
Tex.,  and  the  Baptist  Bible  Institute,  at  New  Orleans,  La.  In  1863  the  first 
Sunday  School  Board  was  launched,  but  in  1873,  owing  to  the  great  financial 
panic  of  the  times,  its  work  was  turned  over  to  the  Home  Mission  Board;  in 
1891  the  present  Sunday  School  Board  was  established  at  Nashville,  Tenn. 

In  18S8  the  Woman's  Missionary  Union  was  organized  at  Richmond,  Va.; 
in  1896  the  work  of  the  Baptist  Young  People's  Union  was  officially  launched; 
in  1900  and  1918  this  work  was  placed  under  the  auspices  of  the  Sunday  School 
Board;  in  1918  the  Board  of  Ministerial  Relief  and  Annuity  was  established, 
with  headquarters  at  Dallas,  Tex.;  in  1920  the  Board  of  Education  was  estab- 
lished at  Birmingham,  Ala.  This  board  was  changed  to  the  Southern  Baptist 
Education  Commission  in  1928. 


1  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Eeligious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  Dr.  E.  P.  Alldredge,  M.  A.,  D.  D.,  secretary  of  the  Department  Survey, 
Statistics  and  Information,  Sunday  School  Board  of  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention,  Nashville,  Tenn., 
and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 

2  See  Baptists,  p.  87. 


SOUTHERN    BAPTIST    CONVENTION  141 

Hospital  work  of  the  convention  began  with  the  building  of  a  great  tubercu- 
losis hospital  at  El  Paso,  Tex.,  in  1919,  and  a  general  hospital  at  New  Orleans, 
La.,  jin  1924,  although  State  conventions  had  previously  supported  their  own 
hospitals.  During  this  period,  also,  the  Laymen's  Mission  Movement,  now 
known  as  the  Brotherhood  Movement,  came  into  existence,  headquarters  are  at 
Knoxville,  Tenn.  In  1927  the  Executive  Committee  of  the  Southern  Baptist 
Convention,  with  greatly  enlarged  powers,  was  located  at  Nashville,  Tenn. 

Up  to  1860  the  missionary  work  of  the  convention  was  carried  forward  with 
marked  enthusiasm  and  success.  Every  department  of  denominational  life  was 
quickened  by  the  increased  sense  of  responsibility  and  the  increased  confidence 
that  sprang  from  direct  control.  Parallel  with  this  was  the  growth  in  numbers 
and  liberality  of  the  denomination,  which  was  strengthened  by  the  standing 
conflict  with  the  antimissionary  spirit  rife  throughout  the  South,  and  manifest 
more  particularly  among  the  Primitive  or  "Hardshell,"  the  United,  and  the 
Regular  Baptists.  The  denomination  suffered  severely  during  the  Civil  War, 
but  since  that  time  has  shown  great  prosperity. 

As  was  inevitable,  emancipation  brought  about  great  changes  in  racial  condi- 
tions, and,  whereas  before  the  war  the  Negro  Baptists  were,  in  large  part,  iden- 
tified with  the  white  churches,  after  the  war  they  formed  their  own  churches, 
associations,  and  State  conventions,  and,  later,  the  National  Baptist  Conven- 
tion.2 The  first  Negro  association  to  be  formed  under  the  new  regime  was  one 
in  Louisiana  in  1865,  and  it  was  soon  followed  by  others  in  North  Carolina, 
Alabama,  Virginia,  Arkansas,  and  Kentucky.  An  indication  of  the  development 
of  the  Southern  convention  is  found  in  the  fact  that,  whereas  in  1845  the  mem- 
bership of  the  churches  identified  with  it  was  352,950,  of  whom  222,950  were 
white  and  130,000  Negro,  the  report  for  1890  showed  a  membership  of  1,280,066, 
consisting  of  whites  alone  and  by  1935  had  become  the  leading  non-Catholic 
religious  body  in  America,  reporting  a  total  of  4,389,417  members. 

With  the  entrance  of  the  United  States  into  the  World  War  the  Southern 
Baptist  Convention  took  up  religious  work  for  the  Army  and  Navy  most  heartily 
and  effectively.  It  was  represented  on  the  General  Committee  on  Chaplains  of 
the  Federal  Council  of  the  Churches  of  Christ  in  America,  though  not  a  constit- 
uent member  of  that  body,  and  contributed  liberally  toward  the  work  of  the  Red 
Cross,  Young  Men's  Christian  Association,  and  kindred  organizations. 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

In  doctrine  the  Southern  Baptist  churches  are  in  harmony  with  those  of  the 
North,  although  in  general  they  are  more  strictly  Calvinistic,  and  the  New  Hamp- 
shire Confession  of  Faith  is  more  firmly  held  than  in  the  Northern  churches.  In 
polity,  likewise,  there  is  no  essential  difference.  The  Northern  and  Southern 
churches  interchange  membership  and  ministry  on  terms  of  perfect  equality,  and 
their  separation  is  purely  administrative  in  character,  not  doctrinal  or  ecclesias- 
tical. 

WORK 

The  work  of  the  Southern  Baptist  churches  is  carried  on  through  five  denomina- 
tional boardSj  having  charge,  respectively,  of  home  missions,  foreign  missions, 
Sunday  school  work,  educational  institutions,  and  ministerial  relief. 

The  home  mission  work,  under  the  care  of  the  Home  Mission  Board,  covers 
the  entire  territory  of  the  South,  and  also  Cuba,  Isle  of  Pines,  and  the  Panama 
Canal  Zone.  In  addition  it  goes  into  southern  Illinois,  New  Mexico,  Oklahoma, 
and  Missouri,  cooperating  with  the  Baptist  State  executive  boards  in  the  various 
State  conventions.  It  does  cooperative  work  with  the  Negro  Baptists  in  the 
South,  conducts  missionary  operations  among  the  foreigners,  maintains  work 
among  the  Indians  in  Oklahoma  and  other  Southern  States,  and  operates  several 
mountain  mission  schools  in  the  southern  Appalachian  and  Ozark  highlands.  ^  A 
department  of  evangelism  has  an  able  director  who  participates  both  in  the  city 
and  rural  campaigns  and  in  other  activities.  A  church  extension  department 
has  a  building  loan  fund  of  $1,350,000,  and  the  erection  of  church  buildings  is 
annually  aided  by  gifts  and  loans  to  the  extent  of  about  $100,000.  An  educa- 
tional and  publicity  department  conducts  a  large  propaganda  for  the  instruction  of 
the  denomination  in  the  principles  and  activities  of  home  missions.  In  1936  the 
total  number  of  persons  employed  in  the  work  of  the  board  was  207,  the  number  of 
churches  aided  by  them  was  534,  and  the  receipts  for  all  purposes  were  $450,000. 
To  this  should  be  added  about  $600,000  raised  annually  by  the  State  mission 
boards  for  work  in  their  several  States,  making  a  grand  total  of  $1,050,000.  The 

*  See  Negro  Baptists,  p.  152. 


142  CE'NOTS'   OP  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

board  holds  as  assets  properties  and  invested  gifts  amounting  to  approximately 
$3,275,000,  most  of  which  is  church  and  mission  school  property,  the  remainder 
being  the  in  vested  funds. 

The  foreign  missionary  work  of  the  Southern  Baptist  churches  has  always 
held  a  prominent  place  in  their  church  Me.  The  Foreign  Mission  Board  main- 
tains work  in  17  nations,  including  China,  Japan,  Africa,  Italy,  Mexico,  Brazil, 
Argentina,  Chile,  Europe,  the  Near  East,  etc.  The  report  for  1936  shows  517 
American  missionaries,  2,361  native  helpers,  and  1,715  organized  churches  with 
203,674  members.  The  educational  work  of  the  board  was  represented  by  347 
schools  with  26,799  students.  Of  these,  11  were  theological  institutions,  3  were 
colleges,  and  4  normal  training  schools.  The  board  has  24  hospitals  and  dis- 
pensaries. The  total  number  of  patients  treated  during  1936  was  88,599.  In- 
cluding the  hospitals,  schools,  and  231  buildings  owned  by  the  board  for  purposes 
of  worship,  the  total  value  of  the  property  owned  is  estimated  at  $2,750,000; 
and  the  receipts  of  the  board  for  the  year  were  $1,040,575.  There  are  publishing 
houses  at  El  Paso,  Tex.;  Canton,  China;  and  Rio  de  Janeiro,  Brazil.  The  result 
of  the  work  is  apparent  in  the  fact  that  during  the  year  14,882  natives  were 
received  into  the  churches  on  confession  of  faith. 

The  Women's  Missionary  Union,  with  headquarters  at  Birmingham,  Ala., 
cooperates  with  all  the  boards  of  the  denomination,  contributing  largely  to  their 
financial  support.  These  contributions  in  1936  amounted  to  $2,165,787. 

In  close  sympathy  with  the  home  mission  work  is  that  of  the  Sunday  School 
Board,  which  is  both  missionary  and  educational  in  character.  Pecuniary  assist- 
ance is  given  by  it  to  the  State  boards,  for  the  employment  of  Sunday  school 
missionaries  and  instructors,  the  expense  being  met  from  the  proceeds  of  the 
business  done  in  the  publishing  department  at  Nashville,  Tenn.  Eleven  great 
departments  of  work  are  carried  on  by  the  Sunday  School  Board,  in  addition  to 
14  kinds  of  cooperative  work  with  the  other  boards  and  agencies  of  the  convention. 
Besides  doing  a  large  book  publishing  business  of  its  own,  this  board  also  maintains 
joint  ownership  of  16  Baptist  book  stores  in  as  many  States  of  the  South.  A  corps 
of  trained  specialists  is  maintained  who  traverse  the  territory  of  the  convention, 
holding  normal  institutes  for  training  Sunday  school  teachers  and  instructing  in 
efficient  methods.  Lectureships  on  Sunday  school  methods  are  sustained  in  the 
Louisville  Theological  Seminary,  Louisville,  Ky.,  and  the  first  chair  of  Sunday 
school  pedagogy  was  established  by  this  board  in  that  institution.  Free  tract 
distribution,  Bible  distribution,  and  other  colportage  work  are  also  provided  for 
by  the  board.  In  1936,  this  board  expended  $430,669  in  denominational  work 
and  had  total  cash  receipts  amounting  to  $1,745,349. 

The  educational  institutions  under  the  auspices  of  the  Southern  Baptists 
include  3  theological  seminaries,  2  training  schools,  29  standard  colleges  and 
universities,  21  junior  colleges,  and  15  preparatory  schools.  Of  these  70  educa- 
tional institutions,  the  3  theological  schools  are  under  the  auspices  of  the  Southern 
Baptist  Convention;  the  2  training  schools  are  fostered  by  the  Woman's  Mis- 
sionary Union,  while  all  the  other  schools  are  directed  by  the  various  State  con- 
ventions. The  theological  seminary  at  Louisville,  Ky.,  in  1936  reported  17 
professors,  386  male  and  90  female  students,  an  endowment  of  $1,764,000,  and 
buildings  valued  at  $1,317,200.  The  Southwestern  Baptist  Theological  Seminary 
at  Fort  Worth,  Tex.,  also  under  the  control  of  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention, 
had  13  professors,  339  male  and  222  female  students,  an  endowment  of  $770,446, 
and  buildings  valued  at  $1,484,980.  The  women  in  these  institutions  are  prepar- 
ing for  missionary  and  social  settlement  work.  In  the  67  colleges,  junior  colleges, 
and  preparatory  schools  there  were,  in  1936,  a  total  of  1,487  teachers  and  24,930 
students,  of  whom  1,652  were  students  for  the  ministry. 

The  denomination  maintains  25  hospitals,  2  of  which  are  under  the  control 
of  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention,  while  the  others  are  under  the  State  con- 
ventions. These  hospitals  during  the  year  treated  about  77,057  patients.  There 
are  also  19  orphanages  and  2  homes  for  the  aged.  The  value  of  property  of  all 
these  institutions  is  estimated  at  $20,000,000. 

The  number  of  young  people's  societies  is  reported  as  33,707,  with  a  member- 
ship of  693,186. 

The  religious  journals  of  the  Southern  Baptists  are  represented  by  19  weekly, 
4  monthly  or  semimonthly,  and  2  quarterly  publications. 

Beginning  the  work  of  caring  for  the  old  ministers  and  their  dependents  in 
1918,  the  Board  of  Ministerial  Relief  was  able  to  report  the  following  in  1936: 
Number  of  ministers  cared  for,  552;  widows  cared  for,  443;  dependent  children 
cared  for,  150;  amount  expended  for  relief,  $84,942;  and  amount  paid  on  annuity 
claims,  $247,530. 


NEGRO  BAPTISTS 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Negro  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is  presented  in 
table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between  urban  and 
rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have  been 
received  into  the  local  churches  upon  a  voluntary  profession  of  faith  in  the  Lord 
Jesus  Christ  and  baptism  by  immersion. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR   CHURCHES   IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEKCENT  OF 
TOTAL 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number  

23,  093 

3>  782,  464 
164 

1,378,225 
2,  259,  287 
144,  952 
61.0 

339,  975 
3,  170,  103 
272,386 
9.7 

21,  350 
21,045 

$93,798,181 
$89,  916,  600 

$3,881,581 
$4,457 
4,109 
$10,  913,  652 
8,937 

2,237 
2,081 
$4,  321,  609 

22,  652 
$14,978,506 
$6,969,455 
$1,  501,  502 
$1,358,125 

$1,626,603 

$1,644,266 
$428,  316 
$260,  589 
$216,  241 
$291,  263 
$682.146 
$661 

7,547 

1,  872.  909 
248 

646,  672 
1,  116,  137 
110,  100 
57.9 

170,  270 
1,  536,  839 
165,  800 
10.0 

6,949 
6,862 
$64,802,748 
$62,  115,  403 

$2,  687,  345 
$9,444 
2,015 
$9,  111,  790 
2,586 

1,483 
1,397 
$3,498,350 

7,409 
$9,071,480 
$3,919,582 
$1,000,727 
$747,374 

$1,  272,  732 

$1,107,485 
$252,408 
$132,039 
$120,  897 
$152,  220 
$366,016 
$1,224 

15,  546 

1,  909,  555 
123 

731,  553 
1,  143,  150 
34,  852 
64.0 

169,  705 
1,  633,  264 
106,  586 
9.4 

14,  401 
14,  183 
$28,995,433 
$27,801,197 

$1,  194,  236 
$2,044 
2,094 
$1,801,862 
6,351 

754 
684 
$823,  259 

15,  243 
$5,907,026 
$3,049,873 
$500,  775 
$610,  751 

$353,871 

$536,  781 
$175,908 
$128,  550 
$95,  344 
$139,043 
$316,  130 
$388 

32.7 
49.5 

67.3 
50.5 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

46.9 
49.4 
76.0 

53.1 
50.6 
24.0 

Female  

Sex  not  reported    ._ 

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years              .                     _ 

50.1 
48.5 
60.9 

49  9 
51.5 
39.1 

13  years  and  over 

Age  not  reported      

Percent  under  13  years  1 

Church  edifices,  number  

32.5 
32.6 
69.1 
69.1 

69.2 

67.5 
67.4 
30:9 
30.9 

30.8 

Amount  reported 

Constructed  prior  to  1936.  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in 
1936  _ 

Average  value  per  church 

Debt  —  number  reporting  

49.0 
83.5 
28.9 

66.3 
67.1 
81.0 

32.7 
60.6 
5fi.2 
66.6 
55.0 

78.2 

67.4 
58.9 
50.7 
55.9 
52.3 
53.7 

51.0 
16.5 
71.1 

33.7 
32.9 
19.0 

67.3 
39.4 
43.8 
33.4 
45.0 

21.8 

32.6 
41.1 
49.3 
44.1 
47.7 
46.3 

Amount  reported  __             

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Parsonages,  number   

Value  —  number  reporting            _             __  _ 

Amount  reported 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting)  Ttrjmbflr 

Amount  reported        „„     

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries   

Repairs  and  improvements           

Payment    on    church    debt,    excluding 
interest                             --     

All   other  current   expenses,   including 
interest                

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.  _  _ 
Home  missions  

Foreign  missions                    

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.. 
All  other  purposes          .      -  -    

Average  excenditure  per  church,  _  

i  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


143 


44 


OF   KELIGICHJS   BODIES,    1936 


1. — SUMMARY   OF   STATISTICS  FOB   CHURCHES  IN   URBAN  AND    RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL 

Urban 

Rural 

unday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

21,  970 
259,  517 
1,  656,  638 

857 
7,446 
53,  231 

839 
6,  202 
28,  803 

7,250 
111,236 
801,010 

365 
3,885 
18,  294 

340 
2,780 
12,  178 

14,  726 
148,  281 
855,  628 

492 
3,561 
34,  937 

499 
3,422 
16,625 

33.0 
42.9 

48.4 

42,6 
52.2 
34.4 

40.5 
44.8 
42.3 

67  0 
57  1 
51  6 

57.4 
47.8 
65.6 

59.5 
55.2 
57.7 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars.  _  _ 

ummer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

Weekday  religious  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number       

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars                                          ~  -_ 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
mrison,  a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Negro  Baptists  for  the 
sensus  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906.  For  1906  and  1916,  the  data  are 
jxclusive  of  Negro  Baptist  churches  in  Northern  States  which  were  included 
vith  the  statistics  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention.  All  Negro  Baptist 
jhurches,  irrespective  of  their  associational  affiliations,  are  classified  as  Negro 
Baptists  in  1926  and  1936. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITJEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Jh-ut'<^hfi'!5  (local  ArgfrjiiKfttioTis),  TWrnhAr  1 

23,  093 

1,012 
4.6 

3,  782,  464 

685,  841 
18.3 
164 

21,  350 
21,  045 
$93,798,181 
$4,457 
4,109 
$10,913,652 

2,237 
2,081 
$4,  321,  609 

22,  652 

$14,  978,  506 
$6,  969,  455 
$1,  501,  502 
$1,  358,  125 

$1,  626,  603 

$1,  644,  266 
$428,  316 
$260,  589 
$216,241 
$291,  263 
$682,  146 

22,  081 

1,010 
4.8 

3,  196,  623 

258,  044 
8.8 
145 

20,  Oil 
19,  833 
$103,465,759 
$5,217 
3,743 
$10,  533,  174 

21,  071 

2,579 
13.9 

2,  938,  579 

676,  972 
29  9 
139 

20,  146 
20,  117 
$41,  184,  920 
$2,0*7 
4,210 
$3,  433,  366 

18,  492 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
Number         _     

Percent                _  _  ..          

lembers,  number                  .          .  -. 

2,  261,  607 

Increase  over  preceding  census: 
Number  

Percent 

Average  membership  per  church  

122 

17,  913 
17,890 
$24,  437,  272 
$1,  366 
3,100 
$1,  757,  190 

lliurcli  edifices,  number  

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  

Average  value  per  church  

I>$"ht  —  niTm'hAr  reporting 

Amount  reported  

'arsonages,  number  

Vftl\i@  —  Timrjbfir  reporting 

1,325 
$4,  451,  057 

20,  209 
$19,475,981 

$16,210,952 

-    $2,444,042 

$820,  987 
$964 

18,  755 
148,  067 
1,  121,  362 

690 
$964,  325 

19,  988 
$8,361,919 

$6,  799,  458 

$1,075,594 

$486,  867 
$418 

19,  909 
123,  817 
1,  181,  270 

709 
$617,  241 

Atnonnt  reported 

Ixpenditttres: 
Churches  reporting,  number      

Afnntint  reporter!                  , 

Pastors'  salaries-                    -    - 

All  other  salaries  _                 

"RftpaiTS  &nr|  irnprnvfiTTiftTitS 

Payment   on  church  debt,   excluding 
interest*       -  

All  other  current  expenses,  including 
interest  . 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.. 

TRfoTTift  Tnisgirvng 

Foreign  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution- 
All  other  purposes 

Not  classified 

Average  expenditure  per  church  

$661 

21,  976 
259,  517 
1,  656,  638 

iunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

17,  478 
100,  069 
924,  665 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars                                        

i  Figures  for  1916  and!906  are  exclusive  of  churches  in  Negro  Baptist  associations  affiliated  with  the  Nortb- 
rn  Convention.  All  Negro  Baptist  churches,  irrespective  of  their  associational  affiliations,  are  classified  as 
Jegro  Baptists  in  1936  and  1926. 


NEGRO    BAJPTISTSI 


145 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Negro  Baptists 
by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  membership 
of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory, 
membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives  for 
selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years 
1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years 
of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  churches  and 
parsonages  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices  for  1936.  Table  6  presents, 
for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improve- 
ments, benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics 
of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables  5  and  6  is  limited  to 
those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value  and  expenditures. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBEBSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

STATE 

NUMBER  OF  CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

Total 

Urban 

Rural 

Total 

Urban 

Eural 

"Uniied  States  

23,  093 

7,547 

15,  548 

3,  782,  464 

1,  872,  909 

70 
8,434 
1,563 
6,476 

83,  903 
41,059 
90,  334 

99,  720 
40,430 
133,  906 
33,  964 
2,095 

2,273 
4,096 
37,  701 
87 
3,197 
13,  031 

2,853 
26,  938 
43,  825 
77,  094 
9,613 
82,  888 
79,  437 
154,119 
67,  457 

39,837 
84,978 
125,  049 
82,  993 

47,  513 
89,298 
30,  739 
203,  017 

3 
73 

109 
3,004 
477 
704 
110 

559 
263 
17,620 

1,  909,  555 

1  r  is-1"1 

NEW  ENGLAND:  t 
New  Hampshire 

1 
38 
10 
26 

165 
223 
409 

382 
174 
325 
119 
14 

7 
46 
276 
3 
16 
123 

14 
98 
117 
1,282 
324 
1,161 
1,351 
'    3,975 
919 

478 
748 
2,365 
2,391 

1,155 
1,482 
492 
2,225 

1 
1 
5 
17 
9 
18 
2 

7 
2 
97 

1 
33 
9 
23 

145 
163 
292 

301 
160 
285 
114 
14 

7 
34 
140 
3 
16 
82 

11 
70 
117 
241 
45 
293 
383 
956 
295 

145 
325 
550 
484 

270 
491 
155 
759 

1 
1 
5 
16 
8 
9 
2 

6 
2 
85 

70 
8,865 
1,579 
6,626 

86,  167 
45,833 
103,  264 

107,  480 
41,  746 
138,756 
34,  143 
2,095 

2,273 
4,436 
47,  515 
87 
3,197 
14,  552 

2,969 
31,  995 
43,  825 
249,036 
31,  503 
219,893 
238,  217 
452,  076 
122,  189 

71,  127 
140,  077 
375,084 
322,362 

150,  664 
213,055 
57,  265 
388,044 

3 
73 
109 
3,072 
542 
1,103 
110 

566 
263 
18,  558 

Massachusetts  

5 
1 
3 

20 
60 
117 

81 
14 
40 
5 

431 
16 
150 

2,264 
4,774 
12,930 

7,760 
1,316 
4,850 
179 

Rhode  Island   .           

Connecticut 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  

New  Jersey  -  _    -- 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NORTH  OENTEAL: 
Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

"Wisconsin 

WEST  _NORTE  GENTBAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa    -    .    

12 
136 

340 
9,814 

Missouri 

South  Dakota 

Nebraska 

[Kansas 

41 

3 

28 

1,521 

116 
5,057 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

Maryland 

District  of  OotyiTTibia 

Virginia          .                      .     . 

1,041 
279 
868 
968 
3,019 
624 

333 

423 
1,815 
1,907 

885 
991 
337 
1,466 

171,942 
21,890 
137,  005 
158,  780 
297,  957 
54,  732 

31,290 
55,099 
250,  035 
239,369 

103,  151 
123,757 
26,  526 
185,027 

West  Virginia  ..              _      _~  - 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina 

Georgia  

Florida.--    _  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee.         

Alabama 

Mississippi                        -  - 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas             -                   

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas      -  

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana 

Idaho 

"Wyoming 

Colorado                          

1 
1 
9 

68 
65 
399 

New  Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

1 

7 

Oregon 

California 

12 

938 

146 


CBN'S'US'   OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBEBSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN"  AND  RURAL, 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 — 
Continued 


MEMBERS! 

UP  BY  SEX 

SUT 

*DAY  SCHO 

OLS 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

Male 

Female 

Sex  not 
reported 

Males 
per  100 
females  * 

Churches 
reporting 

Officers 
and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States  

1,378,225 

2,  259,  287 

144,952 

61.0 

21,976 

259,  517 

1,  656,  638 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
New  Hampshire 

20 

50 

1 

16 

60 

Massachusetts 

1,744 

2,792 

4,329 

62.5 

18 

373 

2,655 

Rhode  Island-  

468 

878 

233 

53.3 

8 

167 

755 

Connecticut  .  _ 

2,387 

3,838 

401 

62.2 

26 

447 

3,032 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

32,  867 

52,  900 

400 

62.1 

162 

3,340 

30,  751 

New  Jersey 

16,  799 

28,124 

910 

59.7 

220 

2,820 

20,  041 

Pennsylvania 

11,  628 

16,  599 

75,  037 

70.1 

392 

6,609 

60,  549 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

34,  145 

69,  331 

4,004 

49.2 

365 

6,535 

67,  848 

Indiana 

14,  348 

27,385 

13 

52.4 

170 

,    2,  569 

16,  826 

Illinois  

49,834 

88,  504 

418 

56.3 

320 

5,369 

42,  647 

Michigan 

11  627 

22,  252 

264 

52.3 

117 

1,628 

14,  089 

Wisconsin 

809 

1,286 

62.9 

14 

162 

1,034 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota   . 

894 

1,379 

64.8 

7 

180 

1,143 

Iowa            _    

1,454 

2,907 

75 

50.0 

45 

406 

2,442 

Missouri       -    

16,  293 

28,  752 

2,470 

56.7 

258 

3,191 

18,  934 

South  Dakota 

35 

52 

3 

17 

84 

Nebraska 

978 

2,219 

44.1 

14 

174 

1,182 

Kansas  

4,569 

8,210 

1,773 

55  7 

113 

1,434 

7,127 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

1,199 

1,770 

67.7 

14 

245 

1,266 

Maryland 

12,  766 

19,  229 

66.4 

94 

1,508 

9,480 

District  of  Columbia  

14,  772 

27,  740 

1,313 

53.3 

115 

1,852 

14,  699 

Virginia 

96,  868 

147,  707 

4,461 

65.6 

1,197 

16,  647 

108,  287 

West  Virginia 

11,  856 

18,449 

1,198 

64.3 

314 

3,318 

19,  020 

North  Carolina 

83,  570 

135,  031 

1,292 

61.9 

1,105 

14,  299 

95,  388 

South  Carolina 

87  882 

146,  697 

3.638 

59  9 

1,304 

15,  678 

103,  197 

Georgia        _         

185,  489 

263,  268 

3,319 

70.5 

3,696 

28,  084 

155,  798 

Florida     -         

45,  484 

75,  906 

799 

59  9 

855 

9,888 

62,  190 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

25,  744 

40,  519 

4,864 

63  5 

463 

5,220 

32,  495 

Tennessee  

48,  096 

85,  228 

6,753 

56  4 

713 

9,514 

63,  267 

Alabama  __  ... 

137,  596 

232,  558 

4,930 

59.2 

2,313 

27,  434 

170,  828 

Mississippi  

118,  451 

193,  956 

9,955 

61.1 

2,261 

24,  888 

141,  811 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

56,  746 

93,  294 

624 

60.8 

1,119 

13,  343 

73,  950 

Louisiana     - 

79,  078 

132,  072 

1,905 

59.9 

1,382 

16,  284 

95,  812 

Oklahoma 

19,  782 

36,  606 

877 

54.0 

471 

5,232 

29,  224 

Texas      

143,  029 

236,  642 

8,373 

60.4 

2,155 

28,  602 

176,  922 

MOUNTAIN: 
Montana    _  _    ..    —    

2 

1 

Idaho     -  

33 

40 

1 

11 

44 

Wyoming     

38 

71 

3 

15 

32 

Colorado" 

998 

2,074 

48  1 

16 

274 

1,384 

New  Mexico 

192 

350 

54.9 

9 

72 

289 

Arizona- 

416 

687 

60.6 

16 

130 

694 

Utah                    

37 

73 

2 

17 

90 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

220 

346 

63  6 

6 

75 

383 

Oregon 

106 

157 

67.5 

2 

24 

150 

California 

6,876 

11,358 

324 

60.5 

97 

1,426 

8,739 

1  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


NEGRO   BAPTISTS 


147 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBBKSHIP  OF  CHUBCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936,  1926,  1916,  or  1906] 


NUMBER  0 

F  CHURCHES 

NUMBER  O 

F  MEMBERS 

1936 

19£6 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1936 

United  States  1  

23,  093 

22,  081 

21,  071 

18,  492 

3,  782,  464 

3,  196,  623 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Massachusetts 

38 

25 

4 

26 

8,865 

5,396 

Rhode  Island 

10 

8 

1 

4 

1  579 

1  621 

Connecticut 

26 

26 

13 

6  626 

5  518 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  

165 

111 

43 

13 

86,  167 

46  823 

New  Jersey  

223 

159 

106 

69 

45,  833 

41,129 

Pennsylvania 

409 

303 

166 

103 

103,  264 

100,  202 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

382 

272 

178 

163 

107,  480 

73,  922 

Indiana 

174 

161 

52 

88 

41,  746 

30,  388 

Illinois 

325 

259 

184 

158 

138  756 

83  839 

Michigan  

119 

81 

18 

14 

34,  143 

24,  883 

Wisconsin 

14 

8 

1 

2 

2,095 

2,184 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota  - 

7 

8 

2 

2,273 

1,436 

Iowa  

46 

39 

34 

33 

4,436 

3,701 

Missouri     _    

276 

244 

282 

288 

47,  515 

42,299 

North  Dakota 

3 

27 

South  Dakota  _. 

3 

2 

87 

86 

Nebraska     

16 

11 

3,197 

2,062 

Kansas 

123 

136 

118 

137 

14,  552 

15,  243 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

14 

8 

2,969 

1,575 

Maryland  . 

98 

99 

88 

65 

31,  995 

33,062 

District  of  Columbia  

117 

83 

60 

60 

43,  825 

41,  262 

Virginia-  _  __ 

1,282 

1,610 

1,403 

1,368 

249,  036 

316,  095 

West  Virginia     _. 

324 

299 

235 

148 

31,  503 

24,  166 

North  Carolina 

1,161 

1,316 

1,373 

1,155 

219,  893 

206,  807 

South  Carolina  _  *  

1,351 

1,364 

1,353 

1,317 

238,  217 

235,  224 

Georgia    _.  -  __ 

3,975 

2,900 

2,774 

2,495 

452,  076 

381,  312 

Florida 

919 

884 

1,038 

658 

122,  189 

98,  194 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky     

478 

589 

703 

529 

71,  127 

83,  837 

Tennessee 

748 

896 

744 

757 

140,  077 

138,  605 

Alabama  

2,365 

2,415 

2,156 

1,974 

375,084 

364,  565 

Mississippi  ._ 

2,391 

2,314 

2,527 

2,232 

322,  362 

226,  989 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas    .    .    .. 

1,155 

1,375 

1,472 

1,113 

150,  664 

134,  720 

Louisiana  _ 

1,482 

1,311 

1,418 

1,410 

213,  055 

132,  743 

Oklahoma      _  __.    . 

492 

559 

495 

305 

57,  265 

47,  363 

Texas    

2,225 

2,071 

1,991 

1,761 

388,  044 

234,056 

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho 

1 

3 

73 

105 

Wyoming 

5 

5 

1 

109 

157 

Colorado 

17 

15 

12 

3,072 

2,298 

New  Mexico  

9 

9 

1 

1 

542 

408 

Arizona 

18 

12 

1,103 

817 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

7 

7 

6 

5 

566 

681 

California 

97 

75 

32 

25 

18,  558 

10,454 

Other  States 

:6 

6 

3 

446 

369 

1  Figures  for  1916  and  1906  are  exclusive  of  churches  in  Negro  Baptist  associations'  affiliated  with  the 
Northern  Convention.  All  Negro  Baptist  churches,  irrespective  of  their  associational  affiliations,  are  classi- 
fied as  Negro  Baptists  in  1936  and  1926. 

2  Includes:  New  Hampshire,  1;  Montana,  1;  Utah,  2;  and  Oregon,  2, 


275318—41- 


-11 


148 


CEN'SUS1    OF   RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  4. — NUMBEB  AND  MEMBEKSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES — Continued 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936,  1926, 1916,  or  1906] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

NUMBER  O7  MEM- 
BERS— continued 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1916 

1906 

"Under  13 
years 

13  years 
and  over 

Age  not 
reported 

Percent 
under  13  3 

United  States  * 

2,  938,  579 

2,261,607 

839,  975 

384 
177 
570 

6,370 
4,522 
2,985 

11,  692 
3,752 
12,  823 
3,877 
304 

239 

588 
3,995 

3,  170,  103 

272,  386 

9.7 

10  0 
13.2 
9.2 

7.5 
10.8 
11.9 

11.9 
9.1 
9.9 
11.7 
14.5 

10.5 
13.6 
9.1 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Massachusetts.-    ..            . 

1,474 
30 

5,274 
624 
2,218 

1,763 
9,884 
20,  369 

17,  400 
13,  526 
16,  081 

747 
60 

3,470 
1,169 
5,636 

78,  517 
37,  473 
22,  099 

86,  729 
37,  385 
116,  566 
29,  230 
1,791 

2,034 
3,735 
39,  880 

5,011 
233 
420 

1,280 
3,838 
78,  180 

9,059 
609 
9,367 
1,036 

Rhode  Island  __    _  .    _. 

Connecticut  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York- 

5,652 
18,  149 
40,398 

27,  978 
10,  412 
23,  224 
1,229 
26 

478 
2,520 
41,  218 

New  Jersey  

Pennsylvania  ..  ... 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

Indiana     _       _      ...... 

Illinois  

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota 

Iowa 

2,352 
22,  136 

113 
3,640 

Missouri                            * 

North  Dakota 

South  Dakota 

87 
2,980 
11,  261 

2,752 
28,  110 
36,  782 
210,  500 
27,  022 
190,  871 
206,  138 
398,  174 
107,  250 

58,  841 
116,  524 
323,  002 
265,  553 

130,673 
184,  012 
47,  620 
335,  663 

70 
96 
2,823 

475 
986 

515 
15,  175 

434 

Nebraska 

217 
1,187 

197 
2,742 
4,237 
21,  225 
2,583 
19,  520 
21,  181 
42,045 
11,  924 

5,391 
12,  948 
37,  133 
29,916 

11,  578 
18,  983 
4,582 
37,  880 

3 

13 
249 
67 
*5 

51 
1,748 

12 

6.8 
9.5 

6.7 
8.9 
10.3 
9.2 
8.7 
9.3 
9.3 
9.6 
10.0 

8.4 
10.0 
10.3 
10.1 

8.1 
9.4 
8.8 
10.1 

Kansas 

13,477 

10,  Oil 

2,104 

20 
1,143 
2,806 
17,  311 
1,898 
9,502 
10,  898 
11,  857 
3,015 

6,895 
10,  605 
14,  949 
26,  893 

8,413 
10,  060 
5,063 
14,  501 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware 

Maryland  

29,  405 
27,  544 
276,  630 
16,  238 
212,  019 
255,  479 
400,  214 
69,  865 

98,  052 
108,  650 
311,  103 
287,  796 

174,  157 
146,  720 
42,408 
291,  243 

17,  951 
26,  203 
268,  206 
10,  057 
153,  189 
219,  841 
333,  943 
48,  371 

76,  239 
93,  303 
259,  825 
240,  982 

93,  364 
133,  510 
16,  952 
144,  878 

District  of  Columbia 

Virginia 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  

South  Carolina  

Georgia 

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee  _ 

Alabama   ___    __ 

Mississippi  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

Louisiana    - 

Oklahoma 

Texas     -    -- 

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho 

Wyrvrningr    _  n 

39 
2,020 
12 

11.9 
8.1 
12.4 
7.9 

9.0 
10.3 

2.7 

Colorado 

New  Mexico.....         _    _. 

11 

Arizona 

32 

PACIFIC: 
Washington.  »  „_    _ 

404 
2,316 

174 
2,083 

80 

California   

1,635 

Other  States 

i  See  footnote  1,  p.  147. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported;  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


NEGRO   BAPTISTS 


149 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  or  CHURCHES  AND  PAKSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

o 

% 

|| 

jj  O 

•si 

+3 

0 

fr 

Number  of  church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

! 

Churches 
reporting 

j 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

23,093 

21,850 

21,  045 

36 
10 
22 

125 
191 
303 

313 
162 
239 
98 
10 

7 
41 
236 
3 
14 
108 

9 
82 
84 
1,201 
230 
1,107 
1,300 
3,694 
824 

427 
703 
2,211 
2,162 

1,050 
1,366 
436 
2,099 

4 
16 
7 
13 

6 
89 

«7 

893,7-98,181 

4,109 

'• 

9 
5 
9 

55 
129 
lift 

81 
50 
143 
20 
8 

7 
15 
73 

$10,  913,  652 

49,  655 
4,500 
125,  400 

603,  494 
499,  377 
766,  658 

372,  154 
196,  065 
925,  625 
128,  242 
36,950 

28,965 
22,875 
401,507 

3,081 

6 
3 
12 

48 
40 
38 

67 
19 
44 
8 
3 

3 

10 
50 
1 
5 
35 

5 
9 
13 
145 
21 
107 
184 
43 
152 

75 
119 
179 
162 

68 
129 
56 
159 

1 
10 
4 
3 

4 
38 

3 

$4,321,609 

35,  000 
15,  500 
48,800 

203,  800 
184,  700 
184,  900 

252,  850 
60.  400 
113,  970 
20,  850 
10.500 

9,500 
24,100 
91,660 
0) 
14,300 
64,250 

12,000 
34,450 
47,420 
353,045 
47,400 
292,  655 
243,900 
76,436 
284,150 

131,910 
166,470 
306,252 
188,321 

99,  670 
142,  569 
109,  950 
303,971 

(<) 
29,850 
5,flOO 
3,700 

6,200 
87,910 

12,400 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Massachusetts  

38 
10 
26 

165 
223 
409 

382 
174 
325 
119 
14 

7 
46 
276 
3 
16 
123 

14 
98 
117 
1,282 
321 
1,161 
1,351 
3,975 
919 

478 
748 
2,365 
2,391 

1,155 
1,482 
492 
2,225 

5 

17 
9 
18 

7 
97 

7 

36 
10 

22 

134 
195 
314 

315 
163 
242 
99 
10 

7 

41 
240 
3 
14 
108 

9 
82 
85 
1,212 
246 
1,118 
1,316 
3,738 
852 

435 
710 
2,238 
2,207 

1,070 
1,383 
441 
2,112 

4 
16 
8 
13 

6 

89 

7 

948,  300 
134,  700 
630,900 

3,385,550 
2,  758,  754 
5,463,585 

3,  674,  556 
1,  460,  330 
4,  110,  071 
1,096,729 
144,500 

126,900 
230,  050 
1,687,080 
9,600 
283,  500 
1,  009,  126 

100,  500 
1,  510,  329 
2,  900,  050 
6,  39S,  052 
1,092,837 
5,  198,  624 
3,979,081 
5,620,066 
3,389,448 

2,958,370 
3,255,134 
7,021,984 
5,002,304 

2,565,488 
3,938,207 
1,586,647 
8,344,611 

6,000 
219,  215 
13,300 
51,650 

53,800 
1,386,353 

51,900 

Rhode  Island  

Connecticut 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

Indiana— 

Illinois  

Michigan 

Wisconsin  

WEST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota  . 

Iowa  

Missouri  

South  Dakota 

Nebraska  . 

9 

39 

5 
30 
49 
207 
70 
157 
192 
228 
181 

138 
182 
461 
377 

169 
291 
99 
427 

1 
12 
2 
3 

1 

57 

2 

51,  266 
118,  227 

26,167 
306,843 
501,  764 
366,  172 
117,403 
299,456 
262,  586 
228,  004 
445,843 

491,  298 
394,  754 
773,  330 
339,989 

213,  245 
338,  705 
120,200 
988,055 

140 
22,  419 
1,975 

7,147 

3,000 
329,082 

5,115 

Kansas., 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC; 
Delaware  

Maryland 

District  of  Columbia  

Virginia  - 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  -  — 

South  Carolina  -     . 

Georgia  

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky... 

Tennessee  

Alabama  

Mississippi  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTEAL: 
Arkansas  ... 

Louisiana  -                  .  . 

Oklahoma- 

Texas  

MOUNTAIN: 
Wyoming  .. 

Colorado 

New  Mexico 

Arizona                      -    _ 

PACIFIC: 
Washington  

California 

Other  States  

*  Amount  included  in  figures  for  "Other  States,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual 
church. 
2  Includes-  New  Hampshire,  I;  Montana,  1;  Idaho;  1;  Utah,  2;  and  Oregon,  2. 


150 


CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    193(5 


TABLE  6. — CHTJECH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGEAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
report- 
ing 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Kepairs 
and  im- 
prove- 
ments 

United  States  

23,  093 

38 
10 
26 

165 
223 
409 

382 
174 
325 
119 
14 

7 
46 
276 
3 
16 
123 

14 
98 
117 
1,282 
324 
1,161 
1,351 
3,975 
919 

478 
748 
2,365 
2,391 

1,155 
1,482 
492 
2,225 

5 
17 
9 
18 

7 
97 

7 

22,  652 

32 
10 
26 

163 
221 
391 

372 

172 
325 
119 
14 

7 
45 
268 
3 
15 
119 

14 
96 
110 
1,270 
320 
1,150 
1,341 
3,814 
904 

473 
731 
2,338 
2,356 

1,145 
1,466 
482 
2,185 

3 

17 
9 
16 

7 
96 

17 

$14,  978,  506 

$6,  969,  455 

SI,  501,  502 

$1,358,125 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Massachusetts  ....__    ... 

80,  607 
15,  886 
66,  607 

485,  866 
307,  845 
421,  006 

417,  014 
248,  352 
744,  385 
197,  638 
20,  369 

20,  625 
41,  144 
271,  247 
1,571 
22,  881 
117,  337 

18,  331 
163,  307 
299,  281 
1,  Oil,  570 
205,  631 
873,  254 
801,  110 
1,  025,  629 
607,  784 

330,905 
551,  371 
1,128,959 
1,  061,  347 

555,  537 
818,  394 
258,  759 
1,  530,  100 

1,364 
29,  098 
4,971 
11,080 

13,  113 

188,  170 

9,061 

26,  380 
6,  131 
25,  497 

150,  674 
119,  932 
264,  446 

170,  477 
121,  983 
289,872 
89,  824 
11,  051 

7,002 
18,  748 
114,  435 
672 
9,163 
55,  110 

9,470 
66,  209 
95,  728 
465,  013 
106.  015 
369,  701 
402,  563 
645,337 
290,  400 

157,  762 
254,  584 
570,  004 
492,  732 

262,  594 
361,  628 
127,  384 
709,  428 

783 
11,  990 
2,372 
4,804 

3,219 
74,  356 

3,942 

21,  446 
2,  730 
9,383 

81,  309 
33,  477 
26,  417 

45,  701 
24,  879 
82,  525 
17,  357 
901 

1,933 
1,604 
34,  772 

11,986 
905 
8,508 

39,  332 
27,  736 
19,014 

36,  481 
14,  962 
45,  255 
7,961 

798 

900 
2,275 
20,  173 
400 
4,381 
7,408 

418 
13,  632 
24,  563 
89,  112 
10,  550 
114,266 
85,  248 
60,  975 
57,  083 

30,001 
43,578 
114,805 
136,631 

57,272 
96,  418 
29,  099 
133,  692 

113 
3,486 
406 
1,056 

706 
5,429 

1,111 

Rhode  Island  

Connecticut  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

New  Jersey  

Pennsy  I  van  ia 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio     ..           

Indiana 

Illinois              

Michigan     _    .    ._  _ 

Wisconsin    _    . 

WEST  NORTH  CENTKAL: 
Minnesota      _._    __. 

Iowa,.  _  

Missouri  

South  Dakota 

Nebraska  

2,  358 
9,986 

2,367 
23,  388 
39,  610 
144,  150 
20,  461 
96,  776 
67,  693 
89,  919 
64,  978 

29,  684 
62,  104 
83,  299 
93,  493 

45,  579 
74,  370 
19,  101 
128,  270 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware     _    . 

Maryland 

District  of  Columbia 

Virginia    _  _ 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida    .    .    . 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama  

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas      _ 

Louisiana    

Oklahoma    __             _    _ 

Texas  _       -  

MOUNTAIN- 
Wyoming 

Colorado  

2,679 
446 
603 

472 
14,  212 

1,070 

New  Mexico 

Arizona 

PACIFIC: 

Washington      .    >_    

California        __               .      « 

Other  States 

i  Includes:  New  Hampshire,  1;  Montana,  1;  Idaho,  1;  Utah,  2;  and  Oregon,  2. 


NEGRO    BAPTISTS 


151 


TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 — Continued 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

EXPENDITURES—  continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 

Other  cur- 
rent ex- 
penses, in- 
cluding 
interest 

Local  re- 
lief and 
charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral head- 
quarters 

All  other 
purposes 

United  States 

81,  626,  603 

$1,644,266 

13,653 
4,143 
10,  299 

87,  686 
59,  993 
47,  651 

39,  297 
34,  681 
116,  377 
47,223 
1,025 

1,582 
3,674 
34,951 
307 
2,103 
14,447 

2,744 
30,  346 
67,  232 
88,  589 
22,672 
81,  582 
88,  119 
94,  041 
45,  893 

28,  304 
47,  927 
112,  857 
97,  519 

54,  877 
74,071 
18,363 
135,  393 

406 
3,558 
737 
783 

400 
27,  182 

1,579 

$428,  316 

$260,  589 

$216,  241 

$291,  263 

$682,  146 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Massachusetts 

1,542 
590 
5,130 

83,  161 
45,  122 
31,  137 

79,  224 
32,  981 
124,450 
16,842 
5,662 

7,286 
11,850 
37,  551 

1,172 
459 
2,254 

14,  302 
6,701 
6,719 

14,  599 
5,292 
31,  744 
5,394 
423 

670 
232 
8,325 
100 
628 
2,774 

163 
2,628 
12,  550 
28,  768 
5,421 
27,  111 
24,467 
11,  498 
21,935 

7,134 
16,283 
32,  610 
36,  968 

15,423 
25,  712 
8,733 
43,628 

30 

606 
172 
597 

336 
3,305 

450 

598 
270 

1,577 

4,184 
5,307 
6,561 

8,688 
2,652 
7,772 
2,229 
177 

103 
367 
2,834 
37 
215 
1,809 

166 
4,013 
8,756 
17,229 
2,832 
15,  767 
21,310 
14,  815 
10,  681 

5,390 
7,401 
20,  361 
26,  082 

13,  675 
13,  370 
5,181 
24,043 

426 
110 
871 

5,847 
2,901 
9,704 

4,883 
1,741 
6,673 
2,565 
137 

281 
439 
2,207 
16 
283 
2,120 

99 
1,708 
5,262 
17,  402 
2,012 
14,  638 
13,  035 
8,624 
10,  238 

2,750 
8,382 
16,  996 
17,418 

11,  025 
9,792 
3,826 
30,  152 

2,169 
254 

677 

5,111 
2,636 
3,000 

5,843 
2,505 
9,375 
891 
120 

283 
630 
2,939 
39 
123 
1,310 

152 
554 
1,771 
25,244 
2,844 
25,  915 
18,973 
6,970 
12,  792 

5,759 
10,  157 
22,497 
24,  829 

17,360 
15,  706 
6,005 
52,223 

1,235 
294 
2,411 

14,260 
4,040 
6,357 

11,  821 
6,676 
30,  342 
7,352 
75 

585 
1,325 
13,  060 

Hhode  Island 

C  onnecticut 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York                   ... 

New  Jersey               -  - 

Pennsylvania       

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio              

Indiana      .  

Illinois                        -  - 

Michigan      

"Wisconsin               -  --  -- 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota              

Missouri       -    

South  Dakota 

Nebraska       -- 

2,910 
17,  025 

2,240 
14,  112 
36,  141 
82,  882 
20,  790 
60,  075 
58,  161 
56,292 
60,934 

50,  379 
75,225 
112,  916 
84,  793 

37,471 
110,939 
27,493 
165,775 

717 
5,348 

512 
6,717 
7,668 
53,  181 
12,034 
67,  363 
21,  541 
37,  178 
32,850 

13,742 
25,730 
42,  614 
50,  882 

40,  261 
36,388 
13,  574 
107,496 

32 

1,819 
50 
158 

364 
4,084 

10 

Kansas            

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Delaware                _______ 

District  of  Columbia  

"Virginia       

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina       -    -  

Georgia     

ITlorida              

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky   

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi             -    

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas          

Louisiana  

Oklahoma      

Texas         

MOUNTAIN: 
"Wyoming 

Colorado 

4,037 
380 
2,468 

7,120 
52,  781 

736 

549 
123 
340 

254 
2,821 

50 

109 
33 
80 

95 
1,275 

86 

265 
252 

191 

147 
2,725 

27 

New  Mexico           

Arizona          -       _______ 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

California 

Other  States               

152  CENSUS    OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

HISTORY/ DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 

DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  day  of  darkness. — Although  the  first  African  slaves  were  brought  to  the 
Colonies  in  1619,  a  long  span  of  154  years  passed  before  we  have  an  account  of 
the  first  Negro  Baptist  Church.  This  was  due  to  the  fact  that  those  who  were 
-the  first  purchasers  of  the  Africans  considered  themselves  as  guardians  of  these 
heathen  and  hence,  on  becoming  Christians,  their  numbers  were  added  to  the 
white  churches.  In  time  it  became  a  question  whether  one  Christian  should 
enslave  another.  The  step  between  guardianship  and  master  was  short  and  was 
soon  taken.  The  results  were  written  into  the  most  inhuman  laws  ever  promul- 
gated by  a  civilized  people.  Later,  there  came  a  time  when  it  was  unlawful  for 
Negroes  to  become  Christians;  when  it  was  unlawful  to  build  meeting  houses  for 
them;  150  long  and  cruel  years  of  enslavement  were  meted  out  to  these  people. 
In  the  meantime,  the  spirit  of  abolition,  born  in  the  hearts  of  good  men  among 
the  colonists,  continued  to  grow  and  culminated  in  the  Emancipation  Proclama- 
tion issued  by  Abraham  Lincoln,  September  22,  1862.  The  proclamation  went 
into  effect  January  1,  1863,  which  gave  the  emancipated  people  an  opportunity 
to  serve  and  worship  God  without  interference. 

A  new  day. — Hardly  had  the  smoke  of  the  Civil  War  lifted  from  a  hundred 
battlefields  when  sympathetic  friends,  men  and  women,  through  the  American 
Baptist  Home  Missionary  Society,  the  Freedmen's  Aid  Society,  the  American 
Missionary  Association,  and  kindred  organizations,  sent  preachers  and  teachers 
to  the  4,500,000  freedmen  in  all  parts  of  the  Southland. 

The  chance  given  through  the  instructions  of  those  devoted  friends,  from 
pulpit  and  schoolroom,  did  much  to  make  American  Negroes  today  the  most 
advanced  group  of  Negroes  in  the  world.  Many  of  the  wisest  and  best  laymen 
in  the  group  were  and  are  members  of  Baptist  churches;  among  these  are:  W.  H. 
Williams,  historian;  Dr.  Booker  T.  Washington,  founder  of  Tuskegee  Institute, 
Dr.  R.  R.  Moton,  principal  emeritus  of  Tuskegee  Institute;  Mrs.  Mary  Talbert, 
who  saved  Anacostia,  the  home  of  Frederick  Douglass,  as  a  shrine  for  the  race; 
John  Mitchell,  Jr.,  the  fighting  editor;  Mrs.  Maggie  L.  Walker,  the  only  woman 
banker  of  the  Negro  race;  Carter  G.  Woodson,  eminent  historian;  Miss  Nannie 
H.  Burroughs,  educator  and  foundress  of  the  National  Trade  and  Professional 
School  for  Women  and  Girls;  C.  C.  Spaulding,  the  insurance  wizard;  Miss  Jennie 
Porter,  great  organizer  and  teacher;  T.  C.  Windham,  contractor  and  builder; 
Dr.  A.  M.  Townsend,  financial  genius;  W.  H.  Wright,  great  insurance  man  and 
banker;  Dr.  John  Hope,  educator;  with  scores  of  other  prominent  and  influential 
men  and  women. 

Revival  period. — From  1862  to  1890  has  fittingly  been  called  the  revival  period 
in  the  religious  life  of  the  Negro  people.  They  organized  churches  by  the  thou- 
sands, baptized  converts  by  the  hundreds  of  thousands,  so  that  within  the  brief 
interval  of  15  years  after  the  emancipation,  approximately  1,000,000  former 
slaves  and  their  children  had  been  gathered  into  Baptist  churches  alone.  Since 
every  member  of  a  Baptist  Church  must  be  a  baptized  believer,  having  professed 
a  personal  faith  in  Christ,  it  will  be  readily  seen  that  the  3,782,464  Baptists,  each 
influencing  presumably  an  average  of  3  persons,  have  had  a  tremendous  power 
over  a  large  percentage  of  the  race  group  of  more  than  12,000,000  souls. 

The  church  building  period. — From  1882  to  1905  the  number  of  church  houses 
increased  rapidly.  In  the  period  from  1862  to  1882  there  had  been  built  approxi- 
mately 3,000  Baptist  church  houses  costing  about  $3,000,000.  Church  houses 
were  built  from  1882  to  1906  at  an  average  rate  of  633  yearly,  at  a  cost  of  $893,178 . 
per  year.  This  meant  untold  sacrifice  from  the  small  wages  earned  at  unskilled 
and  poorly-paid  labor;  and  besides,  expenses  were  kept  up  and  the  pastors' 
salaries  paid. 

The  National  Baptist  Convention. — The  first  inception  of  the  present  National 
Baptist  Convention  was  born  in  Montgomery,  Ala.,  November  24,  1880,  when  59 
delegates  reported  and  9  States  were  represented.  Rev.  W.  H.  McAlpine  was 
chosen  as  the  first  president.  The  Foreign  Mission  Baptist  Convention  of  the 
United  States  of  America  was  organized  by  this  body.  The  American  National 
Baptist  Convention  was  organized  in  St.  Louis,  in  1886;  the  American  National 
Educational  Baptist  Convention  was  organized  in  the  District  of  Columbia  in 
1893.  In  1895  all  of  these  bodies  united  at  Atlanta,  Ga.,  and  organized  the 


*  This  statement  was  furnished  by  L.  G.  Jordan,  B.  D.,  general  missionary  and  historian  of  the  National 
Baptist  Convention  of  the  United  States  of  America,  Nashville,  Tenn, 


NEG'EO    BAPTISTS  153 

National  Baptist  Convention  of  the  United  States  of  America.  It  was  incorpo- 
rated in  1915  under  the  laws  of  the  District  of  Columbia.  They  definitely 
systematized  the  work  to  be  carried  on  by  boards  selected  by  the  parent  body. 

The  leaders. — The  National  Baptist  Convention  has  been  very  fortunate  in  its 
leaders.  Such  has  been  the  character  and  temperament  of  its  leaders  that  it  has 
not,  like  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention,  been  compelled,  for  harmony,  to  limit 
its  presidency  to  2  or  3  years.  The  body  fought  it  out  and  has  demonstrated  a 
purer  type  of  democracy  than  the  Southern  brethren. 

The  matter  of  limiting  the  tenure  of  the  national  officers,  however,  is  being 
discussed  throughout  the  denominational  ranks;  and  it  is  not  known  how  long 
before  it  will  have  to  follow  in  the  footsteps  of  the  white  brethren. 

But,  so  far,  it  has  had  only  three  national  presidents,  each  of  whom  has  shown 
such  high  degree  of  "sanctified  wisdom,"  that  there  has  been  no  reason  to  fear  the 
future. 

Dr.  E.  C.  Morris,  D.  D.,  LL.  D.,  of  Helena,  Ark.,  the  first  president,  who  was 
elected  September  7,  1895,  held  that  office  until  his  death  September  5, 1922.  He 
was  one  of  the  most  resourceful  and  eloquent  preachers  of  his  day.  Rev.  W.  G. 
Parks,  D.  D.,  LL.  D.,  of  Pennsylvania,  who  had  served  12  years  as  vice-president- 
at-large,  succeeded  Dr.  Morris  and  served  until  Dr.  L.  K.  Williams  was  elected 
at  St.  Louis,  1922.  Dr.  Parks  was  a  great  preacher  and  much  beloved  by  his 
brethren.  Rev.  L.  K.  Williams  is  a  deep  thinker  and  very  farsighted.  He 
speaks  eloquently  and  wisely  and  has  few  equals  as  an  organizer,  with  wonderful 
power  to  win  men  to  the  support  of  a  program.  His  comrades  in  service  feel 
inspired  by  the  knowledge  that  in  Dr.  Williams  they  have  a  leader  who  is  a  ca- 
pable executive  of  a  forward-looking  organization  which  has  life,  growth,  power, 
and  possibilities. 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

In  doctrine  and  polity  the  Negro  Baptists  are  in  close  accord  with  the  Northern 
and  Southern  Conventions.  They  represent  the  more  strictly  Calvinistic  type  in 
doctrine  and  in  polity,  "tell  it  to  the  Church,"  and  refer  the  settlement  of  any 
difficulties  that  may  arise  to  an  ecclesiastical  council.  Their  churches  unite  in 
associations,  generally  along  State  lines,  for  the  discussion  of  topics  relating  to 
church  life,  the  regulation  of  difficulties,  the  collection  of  statistics,  and  the  pres- 
entation of  annual  reports.  These  meetings  are  consultative  and  advisory  rather 
than  authoritative. 

In  addition  to  the  county  and  district  associations  there  are  State  conventions 
which  are  held  for  the  consideration  of  the  distinctively  missionary  side  of  church 
life  and  not  infrequently  extend  beyond  State  lines. 

The  lack  of  close  ecclesiastical  relations,  characteristic  of  all  Baptist  bodies, 
is  emphasized  in  the  Negro  Baptist  churches,  with  the  result  that  it  has  been  and 
is  very  difficult  to  obtain  satisfactory  statistics  of  the  denomination. 

WORK 

At  the  first  meeting  of  the  merged  bodies  making  up  the  National  Baptist 
Convention  in  1895,  the  general  interests  and  work  of  the  churches  were  planned 
by  the  election,  through  the  State  delegations,  of  three  boards — the  jPoreign 
Mission  Board,  the  Home  Mission  Board,  and  the  Educational  Board.  Since  that 
time  the  work  has  expanded  until  there  are  now  seven  boards,  or  agencies, 
engaged  in  the  prosecution  of  this  work,  including,  in  addition  to  those  just  men- 
tioned— the  Woman's  Auxiliary  Convention,  the  Sunday  School  Publishing  Board, 
the  Baptist  Young  People's  Board,  and  the  Baptist  Ministers'  Benefit  Board. 
The  Lott-Carey  Convention,  organized  1898,  now  chartered  as  the  Lott-Carey 
Missionary  Society,  continues  its  distinctive  foreign  missionary  work. 

No  accurate  or  definite  statement  of  activities  of  the  National  Baptist  Con- 
vention of  America  has  been  furnished  for  1936.  The  report  furnished  is  for  the 
National  Baptist  Convention  (incorporated),  organized  in  1915;  its  agencies 
for  propagating  its  work  are  modeled  in  every  detail  after  the  National  Baptist 
Convention  of  the  United  States  of  America. 

The  Foreign  Mission  Board,  its  oldest  board,  was  organized  with  the  convention 
November  24, 1880,  under  the  leadership  of  W.  W.  Colley.  It  receives  no  financial 
aid  from  our  white  brethren,  but  is  an  active  member  of  the  Foreign  Mission 
Conference  which  meets  annually,  and  the  board  enjoys  the  fellowship  and  useful 
information  about  mission  work  the  world  over  as  do  other  conference  members. 
Interest  in  the  work  of  this  board  is  gripping  the  churches  and  members  in  a 
marvelous  way.  Churches  and  individual  regular  givers  are  increasing  yearly . 


154  CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

In  1792  the  bugle  call  of  William  Carey  in  his  two  great  sermons,  "Attempt 
Great  Things  for  God"  and  "Expect  Great  Things  from  God,"  so  aroused  British 
Baptists  that  12  men  with  broken  hearts  and  determination  to  obey  God  with- 
drew from  where  Carey  had  sounded  to  arms  and,  after  prayer  in  a  secret  retreat, 
pledged  themselves  to  spend  and  be  spent  that  the  non-Christian  world  might  hear 
the  Gospel.  To  begin  this,  they  laid  on  God's  altar  13  pounds,  2  shillings,  and 
6  pence,  approximately  $66  in  United  States  money.  This  was  not  a  collection 
from  churches,  but  these  humble  pastors,  with  hearts  bubbling  over  with  joy 
for  a  chance,  were  sorry  they  had  not  done  this  before.  William  Carey,  during 
that  year,  aided  in  founding  the  British  Society  for  the  propagation  of  the  Gospel 
and  in  1793  he  went  forth  as  the  first  foreign  missionary  from  the  shores  of  England. 
At  that  time  the  doors  of  the  whole  non-Christian  world  were  bolted  and  barred 
against  the  missionary  enterprise,  but  the  great  God  with  His  own  key  unlocked 
door  after  door,  until  today  there  are  very  few  places  on  Mother  Earth  where 
the  preacher  may  not  go  and  preach  the  living  Gospel  and  where  converts  may 
not  publicly  express  their  faith  in  Christ  and  have  the  protection  of  the  law. 

The  outburst  of  spiritual  fervor  and  the  spiritual  awakening  in  Europe  by 
Carey's  trumpet  tones  reached,  the  Colonies  as  well.  Ten  years  later  a  number  of 
Negroes,  freed  by  the  Revolutionary  War  and  like  the  Apostles,  who  from  fear  of 
Saul  went  everywhere  preaching  the  Gospel,  for  fear  of  being  reenslaved,  did  not 
go  everywhere  preaching  the  Gospel;  but  David  George  went  to  Nova  Scotia  and 
thence  to  Africa  in  1793;  George  Liele  went  to  the  British  West  Indies  in  1783; 
and  Prince  Williams  went  to  the  Bahama  Islands  about  1789.  The  results  of  their 
sowing  are  still  seen  after  160  years. 

Just  what  William  Carey  did  in  England  in  1792,  William  Colley  did  for  Negro 
Baptists  in  the  United  States.  He  interested  them,  rallied  them,  and  on  November 
24,  1880,  organized  them  to  preach  the  Gospel  to  the  millions  in  benighted  Africa, 
which  was  at  that  time  very  dark,  indeed.  Carey  organized  British  Baptists  and 
agreed  to  go  down  into  heathen  wells  and  carry  the  light  of  salvation  to  the  perish- 
ing millions  buried  therein,  if  only  the  homefolks  would  "hold  the  ropes."  Colley 
organized  Negro  Baptists  and  agreed  to  be  their  first  missionary,  sailing  Decem- 
ber 1883.  He  led  a  band  of  five  other  persons  who  opened  up  our  Bendoo  and 
Jundoo  mission  stations  in  the  Vey  country  near  Grand  Cape  Mount  in  Liberia. 
Negro  Baptists,  slow  as  they  may  appear,  have  pushed  the  conquest  of  the  cross 
until  in  1937  they  have  stations  beginning  with  Liberia  where  our  work  is  being 
carried  on  by  some  godly  women;  on  to  Nigeria,  where  Rev.  Samuel  W.  Martin 
"in  His  name"  goes  forward;  then  to  Cape  Colony,  or  South  Africa,  where  a 
number  of  God's  noble  men — native  Zulus,  Finges,  Galakies,  and  men  of  other 
tribal  distinctions — are  nobly  contending  for  the  faith;  on  around  to  Natal  where 
E.  B.  P.  Koti,  our  oldest  and  one  of  our  best  prepared  native  brethren,  holds  fort; 
and  on  to  Chinde  and  several  hundred  miles  up  the  Shier  River  to  Chiradzulu, 
manned  by  Dr.  Malekebu. 

Foreign  mission  work  is,  indeed,  the  mother  of  home  missions  and  Christian 
education.  Only  as  we  share  the  Gospel  with  others  may  we  enjoy  it  in  the  home- 
land. Only  as  the  home  fires  are  kept  burning  may  our  churches  and  schools  do 
their  best  work. 

In  1895  the  Foreign  Mission  Department  was  domiciled  at  Louisville,  Ky., 
with  Rev.  John  H.  Frank,  M.  D.,  chairman,  and  Rev.  L.  M.  Luke,  of  Marshall, 
Tex.,  secretary.  Dr.  Luke  lived  but  a  few  months  after  his  election.  On  Feb- 
ruary 13,  1896,  L.  G.  Jordan,  of  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  was  elected  secretary,  to 
which  service  he  gave  nearly  26  years.  Following  him,  in  September  1921, 
Rev.  J.  E.  East,  who  had  served  11  years  as  a  missionary  in  South  Africa  under 
the  board,  was  elected  and  served  till  his  death  in  October  1932. 

The  largest  sum  given  for  foreign  missions  in  one  collection  was  $4,011  at 
Newark,  N".  J.,  under  Dr.  Jordan,  and  the  largest  offering  ever  given  in  1  year 
was  $9,000  during  the  service  of  Dr.  East. 

The  Home  Mission  Board  was  organized  in  1895  and  functions  in  cooperation 
with  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention.  It  maintains  workers  in  all  of  the 
Southern  States,  while  the  American  Baptist  Home  Mission  Society  cooperates 
in  maintaining  workers  to  look  after  the  needs  of  Negroes  in  the  States  of  the 
North,  East,  and  West. 

The  Board  of  Education  was  organized  in  1893  by  Bishop  Johnson,  D.  D 
This  board  represents  the  cooperation  of  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention  with 
the  National  Baptist  Convention  in  a  way  that  has  not  been  demonstrated  by 
any  other  board.  Its  chief  project  is  the  American  Baptist  Theological  Semi- 
nary, Nashville,  Tenn,,  which  opened  its  doors  in  September  1924.  In  1937 


NEGRO    BAPTISTS)  155 

there  were  75  men  enrolled  as  students  for  the  ministry,  making  this  a  banner 
year.  The  Board  of  Education  aims  to  promote  a  training  school  for  under- 
privileged ministers  and  other  religious  workers  which  will  meet  a  great  need. 

The  Sunday  School  Publishing  Board  was  organized  in  September  1896  at 
St. f  Louis,  Mp.,  with  Rev.  R.  H.  Boyd  as  secretary.  In  later  years  Dr.  Boyd 
claimed  the  institution  as  his  own  and  managed  it  by  a  board  of  seven  men. 
Dr.  Boyd  was  succeeded  by  S.  P.  Harris,  a  lawyer,  at  Chicago  in  1915.  In  1916 
at  the  Savannah,  Ga.,  meeting  Mr.  Harris  was  succeeded  by  Rev.  L.  G.  Jordan, 
who,  at  the  request  of  the  National  Baptist  Convention,  declined  to  remain  with 
the  foreign  mission  work  and  was  succeeded  by  Rev.  William  Haynes,  D.  D.,  of 
Nashville,  Tenn.  In  1920  at  the  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  session,  Rev.  A.  M.  Town- 
send,  M.  D.,  D.  D.,  the  present  secretary,  succeeded  Dr.  Haynes.  Quite  the 
greatest  undertaking  by  members  of  the  board  was  the  building  of  the  present 
home  for  our  Sunday  School  Publishing  Board  at  Nashville,  Tenn.  This  build- 
ing cost  more  than  $750,000,  and  with  the  cost  of  equipment  and  the  value  of 
the  ground  on  which  the  building  stands,  represents  an  investment  of  $1,000,000. 
It  is  known  as  the  Morris  Memorial  Building.  The  cornerstone  was  laid  Sunday, 
Ma}7  18,  1924.  This  gigantic  structure  represents  untold  labor  and  self-sacrifice. 
It  was  dedicated  April  25,  1926. 

The  Woman's  Auxiliary  Convention  was  organized  in  1900  at  Richmond,  Va., 
as  an  auxiliary  to  the  National  Baptist  Convention.  As  its  name  implies,  this 
body  helps  in  all  departments  of  the  National  Baptist  Convention.  They  led  in 
the  building  and  largely  support  a  fine  hospital  in  West  Africa. 

The  National  Training  School  for  Women  and  Girls,  the  school  of  the  three 
B's — Bible,  clean  lives;  bath,  clean  bodies;  broom,  clean  homes — was  organized  in 
1900  and  was  authorized  by  the  National  Baptist  Convention  at  Cincinnati, 
Ohio,  September  14,  1901.  Its  purpose  was  to  stimulate,  enlighten,  and  educate 
women  and  girls  in  the  grace  of  service  and  in  giving  to  missions  and  Christian 
education. 

The  Benefit  Board  was  organized  in  1913  for  the  purpose  of  creating  a  fund  for 
the  protection  of  aged  and  dependent  ministers  and  other  Christian  workers  of 
the  denomination,  and  to  maintain  a  home  for  the  same.  It  hopes  to  so  direct 
its  affairs  as  to  be  the  strongest  asset  of  the  denomination. 

The  Baptist  Young  People's  Union  Board,  organized  in  1899,  is  an  important 
factor  in  the  life  of  the  young  people  of  our  churches.  A  great  Baptist  Young 
People's  Union  and  Sunday  School  Congress,  representing  over  18,000  Sunday 
schools  and  557  district  conventions,  meets  yearly.  Thousands  of  delegates  and 
members  representing  our  10,000  Baptist  Young  People's  Unions  gather. 

The  Baptist  Young  People's  Union  movement  grew  out  of  the  fact  that  the 
Presbyterians  organized  their  Christian  Endeavors,  and  the  Methodist  people 
organized  their  Epworth  League,  for  the  purpose  of  teaching  their  young  people 
the  distinctive  doctrines,  history,  and  missionary  plans  of  their  denominations. 

The  Loyalist  Movement,  so-called  from  a  suggested  motto,  "Loyalty  to  Christ 
in  all  things,  at  all  times,"  was  started  in  Kansas  in  1887  and  endorsed  by  the 
Baptist  State  Convention  in  1888.  Its  purpose,  which  soon  became  clear,  was  to 
organize  an  exclusive  society  for  Baptist  young  people.  The  idea  was  welcomed 
in  the  Middle  West,  and  the  Kansas  Baptists  arranged  a  young  people's  program 
in  their  convention  in  1889  and  invited  young  people  to  attend.  Nebraska  or- 
ganized a  State  convention  in  1889  and  Iowa  in  1890.  In  Chicago,  111.,  there  was 
a  State  union  formed  on  August  12,  1890,  attended  by  representatives  from  15 
States.  An  executive  committee  was  appointed  to  study  the  problem  more 
closely,  and  prepare  plans  for  a  national  convention.  There  was  pronounced 
antagonism  to  all  young  people's  societies  in  the  churches.  Leaders  of  the  Chris- 
tian Endeavor  movement  opposed  it  heartily.  One  Congregational  pastor  sent 
out  circulars  to  every  Baptist  minister  asking  him  to  organize  a  Christian  Endeavor 
Society  in  his  church.  Circulars  were  sent  to  Baptist  ministers  urging  them  to 
oppose  it.  Representatives  of  all  denominations  met  in  Philadelphia  April  22, 
1891,  and  two  Baptist  trustees  of  the  Christian  Endeavor  Society  attended  this 
meeting,  in  which  was  formed  what  was  known  as  "the  basis  of  organization." 


GENERAL  SIX  PRINCIPLE  BAPTISTS 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  General  Six  Principle  Baptists  for  the  year 
1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures 
between  urban  and  rural  territory.  The  four  churches  were  reported  from  the 
State  of  Rhode  Island.  No  parsonages  were  reported  by  this  body. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have 
been  received  into  the  local  churches  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by 
immersion,  with  confirmation  by  the  laying  on  of  hands. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOB   CHUECHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Clnircli.es  (local  organizations),  number  _ 

4 

294 
74 

108 
159 
27 
67.9 

1 

266 
27 
0.4 

4 
4 
$15,  500 
$15,  500 
$3,  875 

4 

$2,  548 
$1,  635 
$215 
$360 

$35 

$30 

$50 
$66 
$12 
$145 
$637 

3 

42 
205 

1 

91 
91 

35 
56 

3 

203 
68 

73 
103 
27 
70.9 

1 
175 
27 
0.6 

3 
3 

$12,  000 
$12,  000 
$4,  000 

3 

$1,  822 
$1,060 
$215 
$360 

$35 

$30 
$50 
$16 

Members,  number 

31.0 

69.0 

Average  membership  per  church  

Membership  by  sex: 
Male                                                  

32.4 
35.2 

67.6 
64.8 

Female 

Sex  not  reported 

Males  per  100  females 

C2) 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

13  years  and  over 

91 

34.2 

65.8 

Age  not  reported 

Percent  under  13  years  * 

diurcli  edifices,  number 

1 
1 
$3,  500 
$3,  500 
$3,  500 

1 
$726 

$575 

Value  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported-     _  

22.6 
22.6 

77.4 
77.4 

Constructed  prior  to  1936       

Average  value  per  church                _  _ 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

^mniTnt  rfipflrtp'd 

28.5 
35.2 

71.5 
64.8 
100.0 
100.0 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries  

Repairs  and  improvements  .  „  „ 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest 

All  other  current  expenses,  including 
interest 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Bed  Cross,  etc.. 
Home  missions  _       

$50 
$12 
$89 
$726 

I 
17 
60 

Foreign  missions             „    ™, 

All  other  purposes 

$56 
$607 

2 
25 
145 

61.4 

38.6 

Average  expenditure  per  church  

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  number  _    ___    _______ 

Officers  and  "teachers  __    „__    __.    __ 

Scholars   - 

29.3 

70.7 

i  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

8  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

« Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

156 


GENERAL   SIX  PKINCIPLE   BAPTISTS 


157 


Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  General  Six  Principle  Baptists 
for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPABATIVB  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

4 
-2 

6 

-4 

10 
-6 

16 

Increase  1  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

Percent  a  

Members,  number. 

294 
1 

(2) 

74 

4 

4 
$15,  500 
$3,875 

293 

-163 
-35.7 
49 

7 
6 
$20,500 
$3,  417 
1 
$700 

456 

—229 
-33.4 

46 

11 
10 

$25,  850 

$2,  585 

685 

Increase  J  over  preceding  census: 
Number  

Percent 

Average  membership  per  church  _.  _  _ 

43 

14 
13 
$19,450 
$1,496 

Church  edifices,  number  

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

Average  value  per  church-  __.         

Debt  —  number  reporting        _ 

Amount  reported 

Parsonages,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting      „.  ^  „  . 

1 

$3,  000 

6 

$2,483 

$2,463 

$20 

$414 

6 
53 

276 

$1,500 

Amount  reported  .    _ 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

4 
$2,548 
$1,635 
$215 
$360 
$35 
$30 
$50 
$66 
$12 

5 

$3,  046 

•        $2,925 

$121 
$609 

5 
40 
229 

Amount;  reported 

Pastors'  salaries..  _         

All  other  salaries 

Rp.pairs  and  imprnvfiTnp.Tits 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  ._ 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc      

"FTnTne  missions 

"Por^lgpn  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

All  other  purposes 

$145 
$637 

3 

42 
205 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

Sunday  schools  : 
OVnTrones  rfipnrtine1,  mirnhftf 

9 

94 
414 

Officers  and*teachers                                          - 

Scholars 

1 A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


*  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 

DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

In  the  records  of  the  early  Baptist  churches  in  England  there  are  numerous 
references  to  a  discussion  on  the  qualifications  for  church  fellowship,  especially 
in  regard  to  the  "laying  on  of  hands,"  included  in  the  list  of  foundation  "principles 
of  the  doctrine  of  Christ,"  given  in  Hebrews  vi,  1,  2.  The  General  (Arminian) 
Baptists  considered  it  essential,  and  included  it  in  the  ceremony  of  admission 
to  the  church,  immediately  after  baptism.  Many  of  the  Particular  (Calvinistic) 
Baptists  did  not  so  consider  it. 

With  the  organization  of  Baptist  churches  in  America,  the  same  question  came 
up  and  agitated  the  church  at  Providence,  R.  L,  with  the  result  that  a  num- 
ber of  members  in  1653  organized  what  was  known  as  the  Old,  or  General  Six 
Principle  Baptist  Church,  the  six  principles  being  those  mentioned  in  the^above 
passage  in  the  epistle  to  the  Hebrews:  Repentance,  faith,  baptism,  laying  on 
of  hands,  resurrection  of  the  dead,  and  eternal  judgment.  The  General  Six 
Principle  Baptists  claim  that  they  are  the  original  church,  founded  by  Roger  Wil- 
liams. Other  churches  were  organized  on  the  same  basis,  and  in  time  confer- 
ences were  formed  in  Rhode  Island,  Massachusetts,  New  York,  and  Pennsylvania. 

i  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  Rev.  Arthur  C.  Lambourne,  president,  General  Six  Principle  Baptist 
Conference  of  Rhode  Island,  Providence,  R.  L,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


158  CENSUS'  OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

The  Pennsylvania  Conference  has  only  a  few  churches  remaining,  the  strength 
of  the  denomination  being  now  in  the  Rhode  Island  Conference.  These  confer- 
ences are  members  of  an  international  body  entitled  "The  International  Old 
Baptist  Union,"  which  is  represented  by  an  international  council,  consisting  of 
a  bishop  of  the  union,  an  international  secretary,  a  treasurer,  and  representatives 
elected  by  the  churches  in  the  different  countries.  This  council  has  authority 
to  act  in  all  "matters  relating  to  the  world- wide  union  or  extension,"  but  the 
churches  in  each  country  or  State  manage  their  own  internal  affairs  without 
interference  from  the  international  council  or  from  the  churches  of  any  other 
country  or  State. 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

In  doctrine  these  churches  are  in  sympathy  with  the  Arminian  rather  than  the 
Calvinistic  Baptist.  Their  distinctive  feature  is  still  the  laying  on  of  hands  when 
members  are  received  into  the  church,  not,  however,  as  a  mere  form,  but  as  a 
sign  of  the  reception  of  the  gifts  of  the  Holy  Ghost. 

The  general  ecclesiastical  organization  corresponds  to  that  of  other  Baptist 
bodies.  The  individual  church  is  independent  in  its  management,  electing  its 
own  officers  and  delegates.  The  conferences,  composed  of  delegates  from  the 
local  churches,  are  especially  for  purposes  of  fellowship,  but  when  a  question 
has  been  submitted  to  a  conference,  or  to  its  executive  committee  in  the  interval 
between  the  meetings  of  the  conference,  its  decision  is  regarded  as  final.  The 
present  two  conferences,  those  of  Rhode  Island  and  Pennsylvania,  interchange 
delegates  or  messengers  for  mutual  counsel.  Ordination  to  the  ministry  is  depend- 
ent on  approval  of  a  majority  of  a  council  comprising  the  ordained  ministers 
of  a  conference,  not  less  than  two  ordained  ministers  officiating. 

WORK 

There  is  no  organized  home  missionary  work.  Whatever  home  mission  work 
is  done  is  by  each  individual  church  acting  independently*  Thus  is  help  given  to 
a  "faith  work"  in  Kentucky.  There  is  a  foreign  missionary  society,  and  some  con- 
tributions are  reported  for  work  in  Canada,  China,  and  among  the  Maoris  in  New 
Zealand.  There  is  also  a  book  and  tract  society,  for  the  purpose  of  disseminating 
the  literature  issued  by  the  International  Union. 


DAY 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Seventh  Day  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is  pre- 
sented in  t,able  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between  urban 
and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  includes  those  persons  who  have  been 
immersed  and  who  are  on  the  church  rolls  as  members  in  good  standing. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF   STATISTICS  FOB   CHURCHES  IN   URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

66 

6,698 
101 

2,494 
3,609 
595 
69.1 

133 
6,154 
411 
2.1 

62 

57 
$727,  285 
$725,  785 
$1,  500 
$12,  759 
10 
$41,  510 
32 

45 
45 
$121,  515 

64 

$85,  027 
$37,  847 
$5,  555 
$3,  910 

$3,  725 

$12,  206 
$978 
$1,  616 
$1,  656 
$15,  148 
$2,  386 
$1,329 

52  ' 
676 
3,306 

16 
108 
831 

18 

1,777 
99 

685 
1,086 
6 
63.1 

61 
1,710 
6 
3.4 

11 
11 
$348,  235 
$348,  235 

48 

4,921 
103 

1,809 
2,523 
589 
71.7 

72 

4,444 
405 
1  6 

51 
46 
$379,  050 
$377,  550 
$1,  500 
$8,  240 
6 
$10,  760 
7 

39 

39 
$90,  015 

46 
$51,  299 
$25,  183 
$3,  661 
$2,  513 

$1,  559 

$6,  274 
$630 
$1,285 
$1,  496 
$7,  656 
$1,042 
$1,  115 

39 
526 
2,578 

2 
94 
736 

Members,  number  __  _ 

26.5 

73  5 

Average  membership  per  church  

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

27.5 
30.1 
1.0 

72.5 
69.9 
99.0 

Female  

Sex  not  reported  . 

Males  per  100  females  

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

45.9 
27.8 
1.5 

54.1 
72.2 
98.5 

13  years  and  over  

Age  not  reported  

Percent  under  13  years  2  ._  

CJmrcli  edifices,  mimhfir,       „  ,_  „ 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported.  _  _ 

47.9 
48.0 

52.1 
52.0 
100.0 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936_ 
Average  value  per  church 

$31,658 
4 
$30,  750 
25 

6 
6 
$31,  500 

18 
$33,  728 
$12,  664 
$1,  894 
$1,  397 

$2,  166 

$5,  932 
$348 
$331 
$160 
$7,  492 
$1,344 
$1,874 

13 
150 
728 

14 
14 
95 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

Amount;  fp,portfi<1 

74.1 

25.9 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Parsonages,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  -               - 

25.9 

74.1 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number     

Amount  reported                         

39.7 
33.5 
34.1 
35.7 

58  1 

48.6 
35.6 
20.5 
9.7 
49.5 
56.3 

60.3 
66.5 
65.9 
64.3 

41.9 

51.4 
64.4 
79.5 
90.3 
50.5 
43.7 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries                       ~~    -  -~ 

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc... 
TToTpA  mipsifms                          

Foreign  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  __ 
All  other  purposes 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

Sabbath,  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

Offi<*PT"S  and  teachers 

22.2 
22.0 

77.8 
78.0 

Scholars      

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

13.0 

11.4 

87.0 
88.6 

Scholars         

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

» Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


159 


160 


CENSUS'  OF  RELIGIOUS  BODIES,    1936 


Comparative  data,  1906-86, — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  compari- 
son, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Seventh  Day  Baptists  for  the 
census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1910 

1900 

Cliurch.es  (local  organizations)  >  number 

66 

67 

68 

76 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

-,1 

—1 

—g 

Percent2             .           

Members,  number      __    >  ...  

6,698 

7,264 

7,980 

8,381 

Increase  1  over  preceding  census: 
Number                                                   

-566 

-716 

—401 

Percent                               

-7.8 

-9.0 

—4.8 

Average  membership  per  church                    .- 

101 

108 

117 

110 

Church,  edifices,  number                 .    ,       .    

62 

62 

62 

71 

Value  —  number  reporting 

57 

58 

59 

68 

Amount  reported                    -    

$727,  285 

$668,  200 

$307,  600 

$292,  250 

Average  value  per  church  .  __.  

$12,  759 

$11,521 

$5,  214 

$4,  298 

Debt  —  number  reporting                 _                

10 

6 

4 

7 

Amount  reported 

$41,  510 

$8,  800 

$2,  150 

$1,  942 

Parsonages  »  number                   *        -.-*.    .-       ------ 

45 

42 

41 

39 

Value™  number  reporting 

45 

42 

41 

39 

Amount  reported             -           _  .           .  .. 

$121,  515 

$167,  500 

$95,200 

$69,440 

Expenditures: 
C  hurches  reporting  ,  numb  er.          .    .. 

64 

65 

64 

Amount  reported 

$85,  027 

$132,  068 

$67,  695 

Pastors'  salaries         .    .  .  ..  

$37,  847 

All  other  salaries                 -     -     -     ..  «. 

$5,  555 

Repairs  and  impro  vein  fin  tf 

$3.  910 

>     $90,  647 

$51,  579 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  — 
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest- 
Local.!  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

$3,725 
$12,206 

$978 

Home  missions     .-.  .-  

$1,  616 

foreign  missions 

$1,  656 

i     $41,421 

$16,  116 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  

$15,  148 

All  other  purposes                                ,-,    -- 

$2,  386 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$1,  329 

$2,032 

$1,  058 

Sabbath  schools: 
Churches  reporting  number 

52 

57 

66 

67 

Officers  and  teachers  _    

676 

691 

877 

843 

Scholars 

3,306 

4,033 

5,005 

5,117 

i  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Seventh  Day 
Baptists  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  member- 
ship of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  terri- 
tory, membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sabbath  schools.  Table  4  gives 
for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census 
years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under 
13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of 
churches  and  parsonages  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices  for  1936. 
Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current 
expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the 
financial  statistics  of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables  5  and  6 
is  limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value  and 
expenditures. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  of  Seventh 
Day  Baptists,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States  in  the 
preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and  debt  on 
church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sabbath  schools. 


SEVENTH   DAY    BAPTISTS 


161 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SABBATH  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SABBATH  SCHOOLS 

3 

o 

e< 

o 

o3 
£» 

£ 

s 
3 

3 

e 

£ 

•g 

o 

3 

r2 

"3 

Sex  not  re- 
ported 

§,5-* 

Sol 

3s  a 

Churches 
report- 
ing 

Officers  and 
teachers 

Scholars 

United  States 

66 

4 
1 

18 
1 

48 

6,698 

1,777 

4,921 

2,494 

3,609 

595 

69.1 

52 

676 

3,306 

319 
30 

842 
371 
84 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
Rhode  Island.  

3 
1 

15 
3 
2 

1 
2 
1 
5 

1 
2 
1 

1 

"~5 

1 
3 

650 

40 

1,524 
718 
147 

49 
241 

314 
888 

109 
103 
342 
188 

41 
720 
37 

14 

155 
30 
21 

138 
229 

276 

87 
245 
64 

374 
40 

1,437 
473 
83 

49 

258 
13 

549 
286 

74 

392 

27 

802 
432 
73 

65.8 

4 
1 

15 
4 
2 

62 

9 

173 
86 
29 

Connecticut  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  

18 
5 
3 

1 

3 

2 
1 

173 

68.5 
66.2 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania  

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio___  

49 

Illinois  

3 
2 
5 

1 
1 

57 
254 

184 
60 

888 

109 
103 
342 

188 

""§95 

14 
155 

27 

20 
130 
344 

39 

48 
142 

74 

11 
262 
12 

6 

70 
16 
9 

42 
89 

37 
184 
397 

70 
55 
200 
114 

30 
416 
25 

8 

85 
14 
12 

96 

140 

184 

2 

1 
4 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
5 

13 
24 
59 

15 
22 
15 
21 

8 
53 

76 
124 
392 

60 
43 
173 
141 

20 
232 

Michigan  

70.7 
86.6 

Wisconsin  

147 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Minnesota  

1 

Iowa  

2 

Nebraska  

1 

41 
325 
37 

..... 
21 

138 
202 



71.0 
64.9 

Kansas 

1 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
District  of  Columbia  

West  Virginia  

1 
6 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

42 

63.0 

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Alabama  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas      

3 

3 

1 
1 

1 
2 

26 
8 
8 

13 

32 

118 
17 
29 

95 
140 

Louisiana  ...  

1 
1 

1 
1 

Texas  

MOUNTAIN: 

Colorado  

1 

1 

PACIFIC: 
California 

4 

3 

1 



63.6 

1  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

TABLE  4L — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926, 1916,  or  1906] 


NUM 

BEROI 

r  CHUR( 

3HES 

NUM 

BERO1 

r  MEMI 

SEES 

MEMI 

ERSHIP 

BY  AGE 

,  1936 

STATE 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Un- 
der 
13 
years 

13 
years 
and 
over 

Age 
not  re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
13i 

United  States.... 

66 

67 

68 

76 

6,698 

7,264 

7,980 

8,881 

133 

6,154 

411 

2.1 

Rhode  Island 

4 

4 

6 

6 

650 

716 

988 

1,080 

2 

648 

.3 

New  York  

18 

21 

19 

26 

1,524 

2,076 

2,408 

2,926 

44 

1,307 

173 

3.3 

New  Jersey 

5 

4 

4 

4 

718 

749 

805 

735 

26 

692 

3.6 

Penn  syl  vani  a 

3 

2 

3 

5 

147 

113 

156 

188 

23 

124 

15.6 

Illinois 

3 

3 

4 

3 

241 

244 

295 

290 

241 

Michigan 

2 

3 

1 

1 

314 

335 

162 

18 

4 

310 

1.3 

Wisconsin 

5 

6 

7 

6 

888 

891 

1,039 

955 

3 

738 

147 

.4 

West  Virginia 

6 

6 

6 

8 

720 

641 

650 

681 

12 

666 

42 

6.7 

Arkansas 

3 

3 

3 

4 

155 

122 

184 

254 

6 

149 

3.9 

California 

4 

2 

3 

229 

238 

153 

3 

226 

1.3 

Other  States 

2  13 

13 

12 

13 

1,112 

1,139 

1,140 

1,254 

10 

1,053 

49 

.9 

i  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

*  Includes  2  churches  in  the  State  of  Iowa;  and  1  in  each  of  the  following— Connecticut,  Ohio,  Minnesota, 
Nebraska,  Kansas,  Florida,  Alabama,  Louisiana,  Texas,  Colorado,  and  the  District  of  Columbia  . 


162 


1   OF   RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  5. — YALUE  OF  CHUKCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  i«?  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States- 

68 

62 

57 

4 
15 
4 
3 

5 
6 
3 

217 

S727,  285 

10 

$41,  510 

45 

$121,515 

Rhode  Island  

4 
18 
5 
3 

5 
6 
3 

22 

4 
19 
4 
3 

5 
7 
3 

17 

65,  000 
125,  500 
188,  000 
5,200 

97,  200 
45,  000 
4,650 

196,  735 

3 
13 

4 
1 

5 
4 
3 

12 

13,000 
27,  300 
18,  500 
C1) 

12,  000 
10,  715 
2,500 

37,  500 

New  York  

1 

550 

New  Jersey  _. 

Pennsylvania  __ 

Wisconsin  

2 
2 

6,110 
2,600 

West  Virginia  

Arkansas  

Other  States  

5 

32,  250 

1  Amount  included  in  figures  for  "Other  States,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual  church. 

2  Includes  2  churches  in  each  of  the  following  States — Illinois,  Michigan,  Iowa,  and  California;  and  1  in 
each  of  the  following — Connecticut,  Ohio,  Minnesota,  Nebraska,  Kansas,  Florida,  Louisiana,  Colorado, 
and  the  District  of  Columbia. 

TABLE  0. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


Total 

r 

XPENDJTURE 

s 

STATE 

number 
of 
churches 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors1 
salaries 

All  other 

salaries 

Repairs 
and  im- 
provements 

United  States  

66 

64 

$85,  027 

$37,  847 

$5,  555 

$3,  910 

Rhode  Island  

4 

4 

10,  638 

4,150 

589 

282 

New  York.  

18 

17 

24,  744 

12,  949 

1,  8S5 

956 

New  Jersey  

5 

5 

12,  977 

3,928 

1,377 

852 

Pennsylvania.  

3 

3 

1,071 

550 

10 

205 

Illinois 

3 

3 

1,463 

650 

Wisconsin 

5 

5 

9  048 

3,385 

608 

376 

West  Virginia 

6 

6 

5  290 

3  019 

136 

224 

Arkansas  

3 

3 

1,471 

495 

292 

California 

4 

4 

4  852 

1,892 

144 

94 

Other  States 

15 

i  14 

13  473 

6  829 

806 

629 

STATE 

EXPENDITURES—  continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt, 
excluding 
interest 

Other  cur- 
rent 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local 
relief 
and 
charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral 
head- 
quarters 

All  other 
purposes 

United  States  
Rhode  Island  

$3,  725 

$12,  206 

$978 

$1,  616 

SI,  656 

$15,  14a 

S3,  386 

647 
2,619 
2,917 
20 
495 

u«1 

265 
1,019 

2,898 

3,749 
4,249 
2,253 
140 
44 

1,808 
1,096 
131 
608 

3,070 

1,221 
417 
27 
21 
25 

105 
208 

New  York  

24 

500 

315 
147 
30 

510 
443 
25 
249 

820 
533 
70 

New  Jersey  - 

Pennsylvania 

Illinois  

Wisconsin 

1,411 
124 

93 
211 

West  Virginia. 

108 
236 
12 

33 

100 
52 
35 

46 

Arkansas  __ 

California  

1,000 
666 

23 

159 

25 

337 

Other  States 

1  Includes  2  churches  each  in  the  States  of  Michigan  and  Iowa;  and  1m  each  of  the  following — Connecti- 
cut, Ohio,  Minnesota,  Nebraska,  Kansas,  Florida,  Louisiana,  Texas,  Colorado,  and  the  District  of 
Columbia. 


SEVENTH   DAY   BAPTISTS 


163 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SABBATH  SCHOOLS.  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHUECH  EDI- 
FICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHUECH  EDI- 
FICES 

EXPENDI- 
TURES 

SABBATH 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

<J 

Churches  re- 
porting 

"d 

I 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

"o 

Total  

86 

6,898 

57 
jf 
11 
16 
2 

9 
4 
9 

S727,  285 

30,500 
273,  500 

}i246,700 

82,  935 

7,150 
88,  500 

10 

841,  510 

64 

$85,  027 

52 

6~ 
12 
13 
2 

6 
5 

8 

3,808 

241 
821 
1,104 
140 

252 

164 

584 

Central  

7 
13 
17 
4 

9 
6 
10 

529 
1,  588 
2,372 
229 

868 
220 
892 

7 
13 
f    17 
I      4 

9 
5 
9 

6,796 
29,  400 
20,  072 
4,852 

7,965 
1,911 
14,  031 

Eastern 

Northwestern  

{  t 

3 
1 
1 

}i34,160 

6,600 
200 
550 

Pacific  Coast 

Southeastern-  >  . 

Southwestern.           .       - 

Western    

1  Amount  for  Northwestern  combined  with  figures  for  Pacific  Coast,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of 
any  individual  church 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  l 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

From  the  earliest  periods  of  the  Christian  church  there  have  been  those  who 
claimed,  in  respect  to  the  Sabbath,  that  Christ  simply  discarded  the  false  restric- 
tions with  which  the  Pharisees  had  burdened  and  perverted  the  Sabbath,  but  that 
otherwise  He  preserved  it  in  its  full  significance.  Accordingly,  they  have  held 
that  loyalty  to  the  law  of  God  and  to  the  ordinances  and  example  of  Christ 
required  continuance  of  the  observance  of  the  seventh  day  as  the  Sabbath, 
Although  the  Apostolic  church  and  some  branches  of  it  in  every  period  since 
Christ  have  observed  the  seventh  day  of  the  week  as  the  Sabbath,  and  practiced 
immersion,  Seventh  Day  Baptists  do  not  claim  an  unbroken  succession  in  the 
matter  of  church  organization  before  the  Reformation. 

At  the  time  of  the  Reformation,  when  the  Bible  was  accepted  as  the  supreme 
authority  on  all  questions  of  faith  and  conduct,  the  question  of  the  Sabbath  again 
came  to  the  front,  and  a  considerable  number  forsook  the  observance  of  Sunday 
and  accepted  the  seventh  day  as  the  Sabbath. 

The  date  at  which  the  observance  of  the  Sabbath  was  introduced  into  Great 
Britain  is  somewhat  uncertain.  Nicholas  Bounde's  book,  the  first  book  on  the 
Sabbath  question  to  be  published  in  the  English  language,  appeared  in  1595,  only 
to  be  suppressed  4  years  later.  During  the  next  century,  numerous  other  writers 
on  this  subject  flourished. 

There  appears  to  be  evidence  that,  in  all,  upwards  of  30  Seventh  Day  Baptist 
churches  have  been  established  in  Great  Britain  and  Ireland.  The  most  important 
of  these  are  the  Mill  Yard,  and  the  Pinner's  Hall  churches,  both  of  London. 
England. 

The  Seventh  Day  Baptist  Church  of  Mill  Yard,  Goodman's  Fields,  London, 
probably  had  its  origin  in  1617,  and  may  be  said  to  have  been  founded  by  John 
Trask  and  his  wife — both  school  teachers — who  were  imprisoned  for  their  views 
upon  the  Sabbath.  The  membership  roll  of  this  church  contains,  among  its 
multitude  of  names,  those  of  the  following:  Dr.  Peter  Chamberlen,  royal  physician 
to  three  kings  and  queens  of  England;  John  James,  the  martyr;  Nathaniel  Bailey, 
the  compiler  of  Bailey's  Dictionary  (upon  which  Johnson  based  his  famous 
dictionary),  as  well  as  a  prolific  editor  of  classical  text  books;  William  Tempest, 
F.  R.  S.,  barrister  and  poet;  William  Henry  Black,  archaeologist;  and  others. 
"The  Seventh  Day  Baptist  Church  of  Pinner's  Hall,  Broad  Street,  London, 
was  organized  March  5,  1676,  at  his  home,  by  Rev.  Francis  Bampfield.  His 
brother,  Hon.  Thomas  Bampfield,  Speaker  of  the  House  of  Commons,  under 

i  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  n  of  the  Report  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  Corliss  F.  Randolph,  president  and  librarian,  Seventh  Day  Baptist 
Historical  Society,  Plainfield,  N.  J.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


275318—11- 


-12 


164  CENSUS    OF   BELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

Richard  Cromwell,  was  also  a  Seventh  Day  Baptist;  and  the  four  generations  of 
famous  preachers  by  the  name  of  Stennett,  two  of  whom  were  Rev.  Joseph 
Stennett,  2d,  D.  D.,  and  Rev.  Samuel  Stennett,  D.  D. 

In  1664  Stephen  Mumford,  a  Seventh  Day  Baptist,  came  from  London  and 
settled  at  Newport,  R.  I.  His  observance  of  the  Sabbath  soon  attracted  atten- 
tion, and  several  members  of  the  Newport  church  adopted  his  views  and  practices, 
though  they  did  not  change  their  church  relation  until  December  23,  1671  (Old 
Style),  when  they  organized  the  first  Seventh  Day  Baptist  Church  in  America. 
At  first  this  church  was  composed  of  those  of  like  faith  and  practice  throughout 
southern  Rhode  Island,  but  in  a  few  years  there  were  groups  in  various  other 
parts  of  the  colony,  as  well  as  in  Massachusetts  and  Connecticut,  who  joined  the 
church.  Seventh  Day  Baptists  in  Rhode  Island  were  co-laborers  with  both  Roger 
Williams  and  Dr.  John  Clark  in  establishing  the  colony  on  the  principles  of  civil 
and  religious  liberty.  In  doing  this  they  suffered  imprisonment  and  other  forms 
of  persecution.  They  also  joined  with  the  Baptists  in  founding  and  supporting 
Brown  University;  and  when  the  struggle  with  the  mother  country  came  they  were 
among  the  foremost  in  the  colony  in  the  struggle  that  secured  independence  and 
established  the  Union.  ^T 

Some  13  years  after  the  organization  of  the  Newport  church,  or  about  lbS4, 
Abel  Noble  came  to  America  and  settled  a  few  miles  distant  from  Philadelphia. 
Subsequently  he  became  a  Seventh  Day  Baptist,  through  contact  with  Rev. 
William  Gillette,  M.  D.,  a  Seventh  Day  Baptist  clergyman  from  New  England. 
Abel  Noble  presented  the  claims  of  the  Sabbath  to  his  Keithian  Baptist  neighbors, 
with  the  result  that  some  half  dozen  Seventh  Day  Baptist  churches  were  organ- 
ized in  and  near  Philadelphia  about  the  year  1700.  Soon  after  this,  or  in  1705, 
Edmund  Dunham,  who  formerly  was  a  licensed  preacher  in  the  Baptist  church, 
led  in  organizing  a  Seventh  Day  Baptist  church  in  Piscataway,  Middlesex  County, 

Under  the  influence  of  churches  in  these  three  centers  (Newport,  R.  I. »  Phila- 
delphia, Pa.,  and  Piscataway,  N.  J.),  and  fostered  by  them,  Seventh  Day  Baptist 
churches  have  been  organized  in  many  parts  of  the  United  btates,  and  in  umna, 
India,  Java,  Germany,  the  Netherlands,  Africa,  South  America,  and  Jamaica 
British  West  Indies.  There  are  10  or  more  other  denominations  in  the  United 
States  observing  the  seventh  day  of  the  week  as  the  Sabbath,  all  of  which  have 
received  their  Sabbath  teaching  from  Seventh  Day  Baptists.  Chief  among  these 
communions  are  the  German  Seventh  Day  Baptists,  founded  at  Ephrata,  Pa., 
in  1728,  and  the  Seventh  Day  Adventists,  whose  organization  grew  out  of  the 
MiUerite  movement  in  the  middle  of  the  last  century. 

DOCTRINE 

In  doctrine  Seventh  Day  Baptists  are  evangelical  and,  except  for  the  Sabbath, 
are  in  harmony  with  other  Baptists,  particularly  those  of  the  Northern  Convention 
and  Southern"Convention.  They  stand  with  the  Baptists  for  salvation  through 
personal  faith  in  Christ,  believers'  baptism  on  confession  of  faith,  soul  liberty, 
civil  liberty,  independence  of  the  local  church  with  Christ  as  its  sole  head,  ^tne 
Bible  in  the  hands  of  all  men,  and  the  right  of  everyone  to  interpret  its  teachings 
for  himself.  They  believe  that  there  are  only  two  sacraments,  baptism  and  the 
Lord's  Supper,  and  that  the  seventh  day  of  the  week  should  be  observed  as  the 
Sabbath.  . 

Originally  Seventh  Day  Baptists  were  restricted  eommunionists  and  invitations 
to  the  Lord's  Supper  were  given  "to  members  of  churches  in  sister  relation  ; 
but  gradually  this  has  changed,  and  by  common  consent  invitations  are  now  gener- 
ally given  to  Christians  of  all  churches.  Neither  do  Seventh  Day  Baptists 
forbid  their  members  to  partake  of  the  communion  in  other  churches,  the  matter 
being  left  to  the  private  judgment  of  each  individual.  Church  membership  is 
granted,  however,  only  to  those  who  have  been  immersed. 

Seventh  Day  Baptists  believe  that  the  seventh  day  of  the  week  should  be 
observed  as  the  Sabbath,  not  alone  because  its  observance  began  with  the  history 
of  man,  was  held  sacred  by  the  patriarchs  and  prophets,  and  commanded  from 
Sinai,  but  primarily  because  it  was  observed  and  held  sacred  by  Christ  and  the 
Apostolic  Church.  They  (Seventh  Day  Baptists)  believe  Christ  to  be  the  final 
sanction  for  the  Sabbath.  ,  , ,  «  ,  x  >^ 

While  Seventh  Day  Baptists  for  more  than  300  years  have  held  firmly  to  tnese 
doctrines  they  have  always  believed  Christ  would  have  them  be  friendly  with  other 
Christians  and  cooperate  with  them  in  every  good  work.  Their  pastors  have 


SEVENTH   D'AY   BAPTISTS!  165 

exchanged  with  pastors  of  other  denominations,  their  ministers  have  served  as 
pastors  of  Baptist  churches,  in  their  associations  and  the  General  Conferences 
they  have  interchanged  delegates,  and  in  more  recent  years  they  have  belonged 
to  the  National  Bible  School  organizations,  the  United  Society  of  Christian 
Endeavor,  the  Foreign  Missions  Conference,  the  Layman's  Missionary  Move- 
ment, the  Federal  Council  of  Churches,  the  Faith  and  Order  Movement,  and  other 
kindred  efforts  looking  toward  united  work  on  the  part  of  Christ's  followers. 

ORGANIZATION 

Since  the  policy  of  Seventh  Day  Baptist  churches  is  that  of  a  pure  democracy, 
that  fact  determines  the  nature  of  the  organizations  among  them,  as  well  as  the 
form  of  the  government  of  the  church  itself.  Each  local  church  is  independent 
in  its  own  affairs,  and  all  union  for  denominational  work  is  voluntary.  For  admin- 
istrative purposes  chiefly,  the  churches  are  organized  into  associations  and  a 
General  Conference,  which,  however,  have  only  advisory  powers.  The  General 
Conference  was  organized  in  1802  and  grew  out  of  a  yearly  meeting  established 
in  1684.  In  it  each  church  is  entitled  to  representation  by  4  delegates  as  a  church, 
and  by  2  additional  delegates  for  each  25  members,  or  fraction  thereof,  while 
members  of  the  3  leading  denominational  societies — the  Seventh  Day  Baptist 
Missionary  Society,  American  Sabbath  Tract  Society,  and  Seventh  Day  Baptist 
Education  Society — if  present  at  the  conference,  are  thereby  entitled  to  member- 
ship. Churches  which  cannot  be  represented  by  their  own  members  are  at  liberty 
to  appoint,  as  their  delegates,  members  of  other  churches  which  are  in  full  and 
regular  membership  in  the  conference,  and  the  delegate  or  delegates  present  from 
any  church  are  entitled  to  cast  the  full  vote  to  which  that  church  is  entitled  when 
the  vote  is  taken  by  churches.  For  the  sake  of  closer  fellowship  and  inspirational 
meetings,  and  for  the  purpose  of  interesting  the  members  in  the  work  of  Christ's 
Kingdom,  the  churches  in  the  United  States  are  organized  into  6  associations. 
While  these  associations  have  no  authority  over  the  churches  belonging  to  them, 
respectively,  they  do  determine  the  qualifications  of  churches  making  application 
for  membership  in  them. 

Applicants  for  church  membership  are  admitted  by  vote  of  the  local  church, 
generally  on  recommendation  by  a  permanent  committee  composed  of  the  pastor 
and  deacons  of  the  church.  The  local  church  is  the  prime  authority  in  the  ordi- 
nation of  elders  and  deacons;  but  the  ordination  of  elders,  deacons,  and  all  candi- 
dates for  the  ministry  is  considered  of  so  great  importance  that  it  has  always  been 
the  custom,  when  possible  to  do  so,  for  the  church  to  caD.  a  council,  composed  of 
delegates  from  sister  churches,  to  advise  the  church  regarding  the  fitness  of  the 
candidate.  In  recent  years,  moreover,  it  has  been  the  practice  for  the  General 
Conference,  upon  the  request  of  a  church,  to  approve  its  action  in  the  matter  of 
the  ordination  of  ministers.  If  the  candidate  is  accepted,  this  approval  gives 
him  denominational  standing  and  affords  protection  to  other  churches. 

WORK 

The  churches  carry  on  their  missionary  and  other  activities  through  boards  or 
societies.  Most  of  these  were  organized  by  the  General  Conference  and  report 
to  it,  though  by  virtue  of  their  charters  they  are  more  or  less  independent  of  the 
Conference.  The  societies  thus  organized  are  the  Seventh  Day  Baptist  Missionary 
Society,  carrying  on  both  home  and  foreign  work;  the  Seventh  Day  Baptist 
Education  Society;  the  American  Sabbath  Tract  Society,  which  is  the  publishing 
society  of  the  denomination  and  the  agency  through  which  the  work  of  Sabbath 
promotion  is  carried  on;  the  Woman's  Board;  the  Sabbath  School  Board;  the 
Young  People's  Board;  and  the  Seventh  Day  Baptist  Historical  Society. 

A  missionary  spirit  has  always  been  characteristic  of  the  denomination.  It 
found  expression  at  a  very  early  period  in  the  yearly  meetings,  which  were  essen- 
tially missionary  gatherings.  As  the  number  of  churches  grew  larger  and  the 
churches  became  more  widely  separated,  the  sending  out  of  missionaries  by  the 
yearly  meetings  increased.  It  was  chiefly  the  missionary  spirit  which,  in  1802, 
led  to  the  organization  of  the  General  Conference  for  the  special  purpose  of 
prosecuting  this  work  more  efficiently.  For  16  years  this  general  work  was 
carried  on  under  the  direct  management '  of  the  General  Conference.  In  1818, 
the  General  Conference,  for  the  purpose  of  more  efficiency  in  promoting  missions, 
established  a  missionary  board  (sometimes  called  the  missionary  committee). 
Missionary  work  advanced  under  the  ministration  of  this  board  until  1828,  when 
the  General  Conference  replaced  it  by  creating  another  missionary  board.  The 
churches  were  trying  to  find  the  best  way  to  promote  missions,  and  14  years 


166  CENSUS'  OF  RELIGIOUS  BODIES,  1936 

later  there  were  three  missionary  boards  connected  with  the  General  Conference, 
one  of  which  was  a  board  created  for  the  express  purpose  of  reaching  the  Jews. 
In  1842,  the  present  missionary  society  was  established  by  the  conference  and  in 
due  time  the  duties  of  the  other  missionary  societies  were  merged  into  it.  About 
this  time  the  work  of  foreign  missions  was  undertaken.  The  first  foreign  ^mission 
to  be  established  permanently  was  in  China,  four  missionaries  going  out  in  1847. 
The  work  has  steadily  grown  until  it  has  extended  to  four  continents  and  the  isles 
of  the  sea.  During  all  this  time  the  board  has  fostered  the  home  mission  work 
of  Seventh  Day  Baptists.  ,  ..«,«,. 

The  American  Sabbath  Tract  Society  was  organized  m  1843  for  the  purpose 
of  promoting  denominational  work  especially  by  means  of  the  printed  page. 
In  the  year  1872,  in  addition  to  the  publishing  of  tracts,  it  took  over  the  babbath 
Recorder,  the  denominational  paper,  long  published  under  other  auspices,  and 
has  served  the  churches  by  publishing,  not  only  the  Sabbath  Recorder,  but 
Bible  school  lesson  helps,  various  other  periodicals,  tracts,  and  other  types  of 
literature  needed  by  the  churches  as  well.  . 

From  an  early  date,  Seventh  Day  Baptist  churches  have  been  intensely  inter- 
ested in  promoting  education.  The  churches  in  Rhode  Island  helped  found 
Brown  University;  early  in  the  last  century  education  societies  were  formed 
in  some  of  the  churches  with  the  express  view  of  aiding  young  men  preparing  for 
the  ministry;  and  Seventh  Day  Baptist  churches  founded  12  or  more  academies, 
3  of  which  became  colleges.  About  100  years  ago  the  churches  through  the 
General  Conference  established  an  education  committee.  Later  this  was  merged 
into  another  education  committee  or  board,  and  in  1855  the  General  Conference 
formed  the  present  education  society.  Through  this  society  the  churches  have 
fostered  the  interests  of  education,  particularly  the  education  of  the  ministry. 
At  present  there  are  three  institutions  of  college  rank,  Alfred  University,  Alfred, 
N  Y.,  with  its  college,  School  of  Religious  Education,  and  three  technical  schools; 
Milton  College,  Milton,  Wis.;  and  Salem  College,  Salem,  W.  Va. 

One  of  the  efficient  organizations  in  the  work  of  the  denomination  is  the  Woman  s 
Board,  organized  in  1884.  It  has  been  doing  excellent  service  in  the  fields  of 
industrial,  missionary,  educational,  and  Sabbath  promotion  activities. 

Organized  denominational  Sabbath  school  work  was  begun  in  1836,  although 
Sabbath  schools  were  already  in  existence  in  various  churches,  one  at  least  having 
been  organized  as  early  as  1740  by  the  German  Seventh  Day  Baptists  at  Ephrata, 
Pa.  Previous  to  1872  Sabbath  school  boards  were  appointed  by  the  various 
associations  and  carried  forward  systematic  work  in  this  field  within  their  respec- 
tive boundaries.  In  that  year  the  General  Conference  created  its  denominational 
Sabbath  school  board,  which  is  incorporated  and  has  general  charge  of  the  activi- 
ties that  naturally  fall  to  such  an  organization,  including  supervision  of  Sabbath 
school  literature.  ,  ,  _  __,  _  ,  __ 

Much  attention  has  been  given  to  young  people's  work.  Ihe  nrst  Young 
People's  Christian  Endeavor  societies  were  formed  in  1884,  3  years  after  the 
beginning  of  the  movement  under  Rev.  F.  E.  Clark,  at  Portland,  Maine. 
Prior  to  the  appearance  of  Christian  Endeavor  societies,  work  among  young 
people  had  been  fostered  by  the  organization  of  societies  called  Excel  Bands. 
This  movement  in  the  interest  of  young  people  has  continued  through  the  years, 
and  for  the  last  half  century  it  has  been  directed  by  a  committee  or  board  ap- 
pointed by  the  General  Conference. 

History  is  an  important  phase  of  the  activities  of  any  denomination  the  same  as 
it  is  in  the  nation.  For  many  years  the  General  Conference  promoted  this  work 
for  the  churches,  but  in  recent  years  the  Seventh  Day  Baptist  Historical  Society 
has  fostered  it.  This  society  occupies  one  floor  of  the  Seventh  Day  Baptist 
Building  in  Plainfield,  N.  J.,  where  it  has  installed  a  valuable  library  and  museum 
relating  to  the  history  of  Seventh  Day  Baptists. 


WILL  BAPTISTS 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Free  Will  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is  presented 
in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between  urban  and 
rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have  been 
received  into  the  local  churches  upon  evidence  of  a  change  of  heart,  profession  of 
faith  in  the  Lord  Jesus  Christ,  immersion  by  a  proper  administrator,  and  accept- 
ance of  the  church  covenant. 

TABLE  I. — SUMMARY   OF   STATISTICS    FOE    CHURCHES  IN    URBAN    AND    RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEECENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number      _>    _  _ 

920 

76,  643 
83 

29,  960 
45,  439 
1,244 
65.9 

1,095 
65,  386 
10,  162 
1.6 

714 
692 
$1,  090,  779 
$1,  014,  730 
$76,  049 
$1,576 
45 
$21,  021 
429 

20 
17 
$17,  375 

843 
$192,620 
$88,240 
$10,  279 
$40,  160 

$7,546 

$11,  068 
$12,  562 
$5,  526 
$2,  413 
$3,111 
$11,  715 
$228 

78 

6,385 
82 

2,467 
3,858 
60 
63.9 

154 
5,708 
523 
2,6 

66 
66 
$171,  150 
$159,  340 
$11,  810 
$2,  593 
8 
$9,  735 
40 

4 
4 
$5,300 

74 
$28,852 
$13,  091 
$944 
$4,087 

$2,  555 

$3,  413 
$1,  370 
$499 
$250 
$224 
$2,419 
$390 

842 

70,  258 
83 

27,  493 
41,  581 
1,184 
66.1 

941 
59,  678 
9,639 
1.6 

648 
626 
$919,  629 
$855,  390 
$64,  239 
$1,  469 
37 
$11,  286 
389 

16 
13 
$12,075 

769 
$163,  768 
$75,  149 
$9.  335 
$36,  073 

$4,991 

$7,  655 
$11,  192 
$5,  027 
$2,163 
$2,887 
$9,296 
$213 

8.5 
8  3 

91.5 
91.7 

Members,  number  ... 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

8.2 
8.5 

4.8 

91.8 
91.5 
95  2 

Female  

Sex  not  reported  ._  

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age' 
Under  13  years 

14.1 
8.7 
5.1 

85.9 
91.3 
94.9 

13  years  and  over 

Age  not  reported 

Percent  under  13  years  ' 

Church  edifices,  number 

9.2 
9.5 
15.7 
15  7 
15.5 

90.8 
90.5 
84.3 
S4.3 
84.5 

Value  —  number  reporting       

Constructed  prior  to  1936 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church 

Debt-""-number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

46  3 
9.3 

53  7 
90.7 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Parsonages  number 

Amount  reported 

30.5 

8.8 
15.0 
14.8 
9.2 
10.2 

33.9 

30.8 
10.9 
9.0 
10.4 
7.2 
20.6 

69.5 

91.2 
85.0 
85.2 
90.8 
89.8 

66.1 

69.2 
89.1 
91.0 
89.6 
92.8 
79.4 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  repotting,  number                 

Amount  reported 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  inter- 
est                                         -    

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest         -  

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc... 

TForeif  n  missions                             

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.. 
All  other  purposes  

Average  exoenditure  Der  church..  _  

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


167 


168 


OENStTS    OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOB   CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITSM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  _ 

699 
5,595 
42,  455 

13 

79 
367 

20 
125 
962 

5 
26 
477 

71 
630 

5,  257 

628 
4,965 
37,  198 

13 
79 
367 

19 
117 
918 

5 

26 

477 

10.2 
1L3 
12.4 

89.8 
88.7 
87.6 

Officers  and  teachers  

Scholars..  

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

100.0 

Weekday  religious  schools: 
Churches  reporting  number 

1 
8 
44 

Officers  and  teachers  

6.4 

4.6 

93.6 
95  4 

Scholars  

Parochial  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars  

100.0 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Free  Will  Baptists  for  the 
census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number        

920 

-104 
—10.2 

1,024 

274 
36.5 

79,  592 

24,759 
45.2 
78 

770 

765 
$1,  156,  743 
$1,  512 
69 
$32,  564 

750 

142 
23.4 

54,  833 

14,  553 
36.1 
73 

656 
656 
$517,  240 
$788 
42 
$6,  260 

608 

Increase  *  over  preceding  census: 
Niirnbftr 

Percent 

Members,  number...    

76,  643 

-2,949 
-3.7 
83 

714 
692 
$1,  090,  779 
$1,  576 
45 
$21,  021 

20 
17 
$17,  375 

843 
$192,  620 
$88,  240 
$10,  279 
$40,  160 
$7,  546 
$11,  068 
$12,  562 
$5,  526 
$2,  413 
$3,  111 
$11,  715 

40,  280 

Increase  i  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

Percent  _  

Average  membership  per  church  

66 

556 
554 
$296,  585 
$535 
37 
$3,  536 

Church,  edifices,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported 

Average  value  per  church  

Debt  —  number  reporting 

Atnoiint  reported 

Parsonages,  ntiTTibP-r 

Valiift  —  Tiiirnhftr  reporting 

9 
$18,400 

872 
$252,  613 

$179,730 

$66,  557 

$6,  326 
$290 

643 
4,202 
38,199 

14 
$9,  630 

612 

$75,  835 

$64,  182 
$11,  653 

8 
$3,  400 

Ainotint  reported 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Amount  reported  .  . 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  and  improvements  

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc  
Home  missions  

Poreign  missions  . 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

All  other  purposes  _. 

Not  classified-  

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$228 

699 
6,595 
42,455 

$124 

390 
2.547 
22,  421 

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  immbftr. 

263 
1,440 
12,720 

Officers  andlteachers  _  _    - 

Scholars  

1 A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


FREE    WILL   BAPTISTS 


169 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Free  Will 
Baptists  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  member- 
ship of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  terri- 
tory, membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives 
the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years  1906  to 
1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age7' 
and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  churches  and  parson- 
ages and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for 
1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improvements, 
benevolences,  etc. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions.— Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  of  Free  Will 
Baptists,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States  in  the 
preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and  debt  on 
church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 

TABLE  3. — NTTMBEE  AND  MEMBEKSHIP  OF  CHUBCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RTTKAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OP 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BT  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

, 

1 

"§ 
2 

« 

i 

£ 

1 

« 

| 

<D 

•s 

Sex  not  reported 

£ 

§- 

P.CJ 

Churches  reporting 

13 
§  e3 

t_| 

I 

Scholars 

United  States  

920 

78 

842 

76,643 

6,385 

70,  258 

29,  960 

45,  489 

1  244 

flfi  9 

699 

5,595 
13 
332 
718 

"""68 
1,818 
293 
258 
121 

11 

648 
551 
72 

363 
319 
10 

42,455 
105 
2,189 
4,099 

""622 
15,708 
2,537 
1,701 
791 

80 
4,892 
3,982 
445 

2,621 
2,593 
90 

MEDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Pennsylvania 

1 

1 
37 
96 

9 
11 
231 
33 
62 
26 

8 

53 
1,925 
7,006 

472 
490 
26,230 
2,577 
5,449 
2,540 

1,116 

178 
662 

53 
1,747 
6,344 

472 
490 
24,  034 
2,213 
5,228 
2,272 

1,116 
7,525 
9,692 
1,360 

3,791 
3,921 

25 

782 
2,760 

171 

204 
10,  165 
1,042 
2,089 
973 

477 
2,978 
4,346 
640 

1,619 
1,635 
54 

28 
1,122 
4,037 

301 
285 
15,  767 
1,535 
3,359 
1,567 

639 
4,762 
6,048 
920 

2,395 
2,593 
81 

1 
37 

87 

..... 

212 
35 
35 
19 

1 

84 
77 
8 

53 
41 
1 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

40 
104 
ft 

3 

8 

21 
209 

""I 
298 
_ 

~~522 
114 

""78 

69.7 
68.4 

56.8 
71.6 
64.5 
67.9 
62.2 
62.1 

74.6 
62.5 
71  9 
69.6 

67.6 
63.1 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri  

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

West  Virginia 

11 

North  Carolina 

255 
40 
64 
30 

8 

24 
7 
2 

4 

2,196 
364 
221 
268 

South  Carolina  

Georgia  

Florida         

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee                  

104 
108 
14 

71 
60 
1 

8 
9 
1 

6 
6 
1 

96 
99 
13 

66 

54 

8,262 
10,508 
1,560 

4,014 
4,306 
135 

737 
816 
200 

223 
385 
135 

Albania 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas     -- 

Okl*vh<">mft 

Texas 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


170 


CENSUS    OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBEESHIP  OF  CHTJBCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE, 
1936 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

9 

f! 

VI   j_, 

J3  <» 

M 

TI 

sS 

Ot3 
fl.g 

aa 

«3£ 

4oS 

ll 

&   fl 

PH  o 

United  States  

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Pennsylvania 

920 
1 

1,024 

750 

'ii.avrs 

608 

76,  643 

79,  592 

54,  833 

40,  280 

1,095 

65,  386 

10,  162 

1.6 

53 
1,925 

53 
1,690 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

40 

39 
1 

1 

30 

2,014 
75 
38 

26 
5,261 

30 

1,425 

50 

185 

2.9 

Indians 

Illinois 

1 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Iowa 

1 

87 

1 

68 
11 

50 
4,868 
581 
373 

Missouri 

104 



7,006 

181 

6,004 

821 

2.9 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

3 

13 

14 
308 
49 
88 
30 

10 
82 
91 
7 

103 
96 
1 

6 

__... 

253 
31 
95 
26 

4 
51 
82 
18 

62 
22 
12 

83 

465 
456 
31,  256 
3,594 
6,317 
2,761 

1,077 
6,608 
8,136 
595 

5,270 
5,469 
91 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

9 
11 
255 
40 
64 
30 

8 
104 
108 
14 

71 
60 
1 

1 
7 
284 
41 
77 
26 

"49" 
42 
1 

10 
29 
11 

472 
490 
26,  230 
2,577 
5,449 
2,540 

1,116 
8,262 
10,  508 
1,560 

4,014 
4,306 
135 

64 
193 
22,  518 
2,649 
4,500 
1,424 

3 
3 

349 
25 
41 
21 

469 
307 
22,  070 
2,068 
4,696 
2,159 

939 
6,650 
9,407 
1,465 

3,676 
3,603 
130 

.6 
1.0 
1.6 
1.2 
.9 
1.0 

"l.~7 
1.3 
1.3 

.4 
3.9 
3.7 

West  Virginia 

296 
22,914 

2,281 
6,152 
1,424 

344 
4,681 
5,854 
921 

2,926 
680 
458 

180 
3,811 
484 
712 
360 

177 
1,498 
975 
76 

325 
558 

North  Carolina  
South  Carolina  __  „_ 

Georgia             

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee 

3,093 
2,213 
35 

371 
1,288 
507 

114 
126 
19 

13 
145 
5 

Alabama  »       

Mississippi—    ._ 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL; 
Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

1  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


FREE   WILL  BAPTISTS 


171 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States.    . 

920 

714 

692 

$1,  090,  779 

45 

$21,021 

17 

$17,375 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Pennsylvania    „ 

1 
40 
104 

9 

11 
255 
40 
64 
30 

8 
104 
108 
14 

71 
60 
1 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

34 

75 

5 

7 
228 
35 
59 
27 

4 
77 
90 
14 

38 
20 
1 

33 
73 

5 

7 
222 
33 
58 
27 

4 
75 
86 
14 

34 
20 
1 

65,  450 
81,  325 

3,975 

8,542 
436,866 
58,  264 
60,  325 
21,460 

8,100 
128,200 
81,  547 
18,  100 

23,600 
}   395,025 

1 
2 
2 

1,200 
370 
129 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri  . 

1 

0) 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia  

West  Virginia  

North  Carolina  
South  Carolina 

17 
5 
1 
1 

1 
4 
7 
2 

13,  445 
1,349 
560 
56 

1,000 
212 
2,395 
210 

4 
1 
3 

8.000 
C1) 
2,  "00 

Georgia 

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

1 
2 
2 
1 

0) 

8 

0) 

Tennessee  .    .. 

Alabama.    

Mississippi  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

2 

95 

2 

(0 
6,875 

Texas     

Combinations 

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 

3  Amount  for  Oklahoma  combined  with  figures  for  Texas,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  indi- 
vidual church. 


172  CENSUS'   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    3936 

TABLE  6. — CHTJECH  EXPENDITUKBS  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 

AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Repairs 
and  im- 
provements 

United  States      .... 

920 
1 
40 

104 

Q 
11 
255 
40 
64 
30 

8 
104 
108 
14 

71 
60 
1 

843 
1 
38 
92 

6 
11 
252 
39 
63 
29 

4 

97 
95 
13 

55 
47 
1 

$192,  620 

888,240 
2,989 

7,689 

135 
1,070 
38,  607 
5,084 
5,408 
1,538 

70 
10,  305 
6,455 
1,398 

2,713 
4,779 

$10,  279 
352 

870 

18 
85 
5,223 
203 
490 
143 

60 
1,071 
678 
265 

316 
505 

$40,  160 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Pennsylvania 

t       18,827 

14,  268 

816 
2,051 
90,  050 
10,  293 
10,  722 
2,791 

1,274 
18,  517 
17,  684 
3,065 

4,467 
[       27,795 

2,241 

1,793 

355 
175 
16,  831 
2,002 
2,873 
499 

338 
3,724 
7,064 
1,005 

381 

879 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL- 
Missouri  -   

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia  _-    -  

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  

South  Carolina  - 

Georgia 

Florida        _. 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi  ...  -    

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas     .  

Oklahoma 

Texas  -  

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

EXPENDITURES—  continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt,exclud- 
ing  interest 

Other  cur- 
rent expen- 
ses, includ- 
ing interest 

Local  re- 
lief and 
charity 

Home 

missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral head- 
quarters 

All  other 
purposes 

United  States 

$7,  546 

$11,  068 

S12,  562 

$5,  526 

$2,  413 

$3,  111 

100 
94 

$11,715 

852 
449 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Pennsylvania  

I            640 

927 
30 

1,046 

1,014 

10 
99 
5,418 
744 
152 
183 

160 
1,051 
450 
24 

354 
363 

131 

166 

261 
60 
8,176 
498 
463 
58 

93 
590 
1,415 
65 

247 
339 

157 

648 

7 
68 
2,448 
291 
407 
45 

319 
618 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri  

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia  

West  Virginia.  _.  

31 
896 
16 
157 
7 

56 
1,716 
285 
222 
41 

8 
328 
113 

407 
7,851 
550 
163 
36 

45 
241 
683 
35 

135 
268 

North  Carolina  

2,884 
620 
387 
241 

500 
500 
440 
208 

74 
}              95 

South  Carolina  

Georgia 

Florida   ~_  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee     ..  „ 

421 
348 
62 

154 
470 

286 
38 
3 

25 
17 

Alabama 

Mississippi     

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Arkansas  

68 
80 

Oklahoma      __ 

Texas 

*  Amount  for  Pennsylvania  combined  with  figures  for  Ohio,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  in- 
dividual church. 

*  Amount  for  Oklahoma  combined  with  figures  for  Texas,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  indi- 
vidual church. 


FREE    WILL   BAPTISTS 


173 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of  churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OP 
CHUECH  EDI- 
FICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHUECH  EDI- 
FICES 

EXPENDI- 
TURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

2 

bfl 

»! 

*o  o 

IP, 

O 

« 

! 

£ 

M 

ll 

o  ® 

XJ 
O 

"S 

i 

i 

fafl 

s5 
•sg 

t-i  G 
3 

*a 
O 

a 

o 

£ 

euo 

it 

3 

43 

O 

1 
m 

Total  

920 

78,  643 

692 

SI,  090,  779 

45 

821,  021 

295 
1,800 

843 

$192,  620 

699 

42,  455 

Alabama: 
Oahaba  River    _ 

18 
19 
8 
20 
10 
7 

10 
11 
8 
6 
1 
1 

5 
10 
5 
1 
9 

10 
12 

7 
8 
4 

14 
3 
12 
2 

2 

7 

12 
13 
4 
14 
12 

2 
4 
2 
1 

1 
12 
1 

11 

2 
9 
8 
9 

10 
1 
12 
33 
2 

899 
2.327 
480 
1,290 
614 
616 

943 
1,983 
433 
626 
170 
118 

214 
640 
217 
70 
542 

655 
613 
563 
270 
230 

1,287 
458 
851 
46 

211 
387 

1,  023 
1,459 
183 
1,277 
909 

120 
892 
147 
34 

78 
1,398 
84 

351 

120 
764 
572 
678 

340 
40 
1,217 
2,371 
30 

14 
16 
5 
8 
8 
6 

8 
10 
4 
5 
1 
1 

2 
5 
1 
1 
6 
1 
9 
5 
2 
2 

12 
2 
12 
2 

2 
7 
12 
12 
4 
12 
9 

1 

4 

6,925 
21,  900 
1,525 
6,700 
8,400 
8,500 

6,180 
7,850 
3,600 
7,132 

8 

3,250 
(9 
0) 
3,950 

(" 
6,100 
3.250 
0) 
0) 

11,000 
0) 
8,720 
0) 

0) 
5,250 

10,  050 
14,  800 
2,500 
19,  625 
6,000 

0) 
8,100 

4 
1 

15 
18 
7 
9 
10 
6 

8 
10 

7 
4 
1 
1 

2 
9 
3 

1 
7 

7 
11 
7 
5 
3 

14 
3 
11 
2 

2 
6 

12 
13 
4 
14 
12 

2 
2 

1 

927 
8,274 
683 
1,246 
1,060 
1,698 

1,212 

805 
727 
795 
0) 
0) 

0) 
649 
86 

(9 
413 

321 
770 
1,248 
359 
392 

1,017 
408 
1,427 
CO 

C1) 
1,472 

919 
2,575 
275 
4,010 
1,132 

CO 

8 

13 
13 
6 
5 
8 
6 

7 
9 
6 
3 
1 
1 

3 

9 
2 
I 
4 

7 
10 
6 
7 
4 

9 
2 
8 
1 

557 
775 
249 
258 
429 
362 

342 
439 
296 
165 
120 
30 

105 
405 
88 
45 
259 

295 
572 
326 
330 
196 

416 
64 
327 
24 

Jasper               .              

Morning;  Star 

Mount  Moriah 

Muscle  Shoals  State  Line—- 
Progressive   

1 

200 

Southeastern  . 

State  Line  

Tennessee  River...      

Vernon.  

1 

100 

Yellow  Creek  

TJnassociated         _         

Arkansas: 
Antioch 

Arkansas  

Big  Springs  

Cave  Springs  

New  Hope...     

Old  Mount  Zion  

Polk  Bayou 

Saline 

Social  Band 

Zion  TFTopQ- 

Florida: 
Paletn 

State  Line  

West  Florida-Liberty     .. 

1 

56 

Martin                    

Georgia: 
Chattahoochee 

Little  River 

2 

5 
10 
4 
10 
4 

1 
1 

102 

264 
477 
152 
509 
197 

40 
80 

Martin  United 

Midway—  

I 

560 

Ogeechee 

South  Georgia.    ..    —  

Union    ......    .  

Kentucky: 
Cumberland 

Johnson  ._ 

1 

1,000 

Pike 

Unassociated 

Mississippi: 
Little  Brown  Creek 

1 
12 
1 

5 

1 
6 
3 
8 

7 

0) 
17,  100 
0) 

5,200 

*      5,900 
%550 
5,450 

7,550 

1 
12 

(i) 
2,940 

Northeastern  Mississippi  
Tennessee  River 

2 

210 

8 

445 

Missouri: 
Cave  Springs 

9 

2 

9 
5 
9 

9 

492 

2,422 
467 
1,022 

1,306 

7 

2 

8 
6 
7 

9 

270 

110 
520 
275 
241 

340 

Central   Western  Missouri 
and  Southeast  Kansas  
Indian  Creek 

2 

370 

Laclede  Country 

NIagua 

Northeast  Missouri 

Social  Band 

Southeast  Missouri 

10 
27 
1 

21,  500 
19,  075 
0) 

12 
31 

3,978 
3,109 

11 
30 

992 
1,114 

Union 

1  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated 
of  any  individual  church. 


"Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 


174 


CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    19 36 


TABLE  7. — NTJMBEK  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

8 

i 

,Q 
1 

e 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH  EDI- 
FICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDI- 
FICES 

EXPENDI- 
TURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

e 

bfl 
m  a 

£ 

cojf 

Scholars 

Amount 

P 

A 
O 

Amount 

Church* 
port 

North  Carolina: 
Beaver  Creek 

8 
23 
45 
52 
6 

9 
8 
2 
2 
19 

35 
16 
29 

40 

1 
3 
9 
5 
12 
5 

6 
1 
4 
3 
1 
10 

7 
9 
4 
2 
14 
5 

22 

2 
7 
17 
17 

4 
27 
4 
2 

1 

2 
6 
5 
2 
1 

2 
2 

2 

5 

757 
3,023 
6,414 
5,736 
635 

856 
704 
99 
94 
1,260 

4,153 
564 
1,870 

1,925 

29 
264 
593 
627 
893 
309 

454 
66 
258 
235 
39 
539 

467 
469 
210 
30 
1,352 
114 

2,606 
161 
452 
1,443 
1,211 

369 
1,542 

282 
79 

135 

159 
278 
376 
147 
35 

63 

81 
78 
268 

7 
20 
42 
43 

4 

8 
8 
2 
1 
17 

28 
14 
27 

33 

$11,  100 
56,  066 
98,  250 
92,  650 
12,000 

6,600 
8,550 
CO 
CO 
16,  450 

62,  800 
15,  450 
52,  950 

65,  450 

1 
2 
1 
2 
1 

$300 
3,680 
180 
2,100 
100 

8 
23 

45 
52 
5 

9 
8 
2 
2 
19 

35 

15 

28 

38 

1 
3 
5 
4 
8 
4 

5 
1 
4 
3 

$5,654 
11,835 
18,  901 
16,  825 
870 

1,669 
3,230 
CO 
CO 

1,817 

10,  775 
3,644 
14,  103 

8,042 

CO 
517 
1,134 
561 
994 
956 
442 

CO 

171 
281 

7 
19 
34 

41 
5 

8 
6 
2 
2 
18 

32 
14 
23 

37 

1 
3 
7 
4 
5 
4 

3 

1 
3 
2 

825 
1,984 
2,430 
2,759 

288 

503 
465 
90 
123 

853 

2,735 
726 
1,802 

2,189 

105 
175 
348 
315 
251 
229 

305 
60 
220 
110 

Orginal  Cape  Fear 

Central 

Eastern 

French  Broad 

Jacks  Creek 

Pee  Dee                 >       

1 

700 

Rock  Fish 

St  Anna 

Toe  River 

2 
4 

lio 

265 

Western                   .  - 

"Vinirningtnn 

Cape  Fear  Holiness—  .  _  _.. 

3 

1 

6,010 
1,200 

Ohio: 
Ohio  River             

Oklahoma: 
Beulah 

Canadian 

2 

3 
2 
3 
2 
3 

2,700 

2'co25 

5,300 

1 

25 

Center 

Dibble 

Eureka 

First  Oklahoma 

Grand  River 

Hopewell  No  1 

2 
1 

CO 

TJna^sociated 

"RBSt^rn  Oklahoma 

Hopewell  No.  2 

2 

6 
5 
3 
2 

14 

4 

18 
2 
4 
10 
13 

2 
19 
4 
1 

1 

1 

3 
3 
2 
1 

1 
1 

1 

4 

CO 

14,980 
3,  527* 
1,950 
CO 
23,  182 
15,  300 

29,  250 

3,400 
6,550 
26,  500 

CO 
53,  000 
4,600 
CO 

1 

1 
1 

70 

105 
19 

9 

7 
9 
4 
2 
13 
5 

22 
2 

7 
16 
16 

2 
25 
4 
1 

1 

1 

5 
4 
2 

2,245 

3,024 
1,527 
406 
CO 
4,126 
1,288 

5,409 
CO 
493 
1,761 
2,395 

CO 
6,723 
830 
CO 

CO 

CO 

440 
814 
CO 

8 

6 

4 
1 
13 
5 

17 
2 
6 
11 
17 

2 

24 
1 
2 

1 

475 

508 
358 
239 
25 
1,219 
313 

995 
80 
211 
586 
1,084 

93 
1,633 
50 
145 

90 

South  Carolina: 

Beaver  Creek  _-,  

Eastern  .  

Pee  Dee 

Rock  Fish 

South  Carolina  No.  1 

South  Carolina  No.  2  

3 

1,225 

Tennessee: 

Jack  Creek 

Muscle  Shoals  State  Line  — 
Stone 

1 
2 

8 
99 

Toe  River  CN.  C.) 

Tennessee  River 

Union.  »       .         .  _ 

1 

.105 

"Wautaugua            

TTnassociated 

Texas: 

Hopewell 

Virginia: 
Jo^n  Thornfts 

CO 
1,850 
9,300 

8 

8 
&> 

115,  717 

Sandy  Valley 

2 

129 

Northwest  

5 
2 

167 
70 

Southwest 

Pike  County 

West  Virginia: 
Bo  one 

2 
2 
2 
5 

261 

7,821 

2 
2 
1 
3 

140 
170 
97 
215 

Logan 

Yearly  Meeting.. 

Mingo 

Combinations.         _    

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated 
of  any  individual  church. 


'Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 


FREE    WILL   BAPTISTS  175 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

One  of  the  influential  factors  in  early  Baptist  history,  especially  in  the  Middle 
States,  was  a  Welsh  church,  organized  in  Wales  in  1701,  which  emigrated  the 
same  year  to  Pennsylvania.  Two  years  later  it  received  a  grant  of  land  known 
as  the  "Welsh  Tract,"  where  the  colony  prospered  and  was  able  to  send  a  num- 
ber of  able  ministers  to  various  sections.  One  of  these,  Elder  Paul  Palmer, 
gathered  a  company  in  North  Carolina  and,  in  1727,  organized  a  church  at 
Perquimans,  in  Chowan  County.  The  principal  element  appears  to  have  been 
Arminian,  in  sympathy  with  certain  communities  in  Virginia  which  had  received 
ministerial  assistance  from  the  General  Baptists  of  England.  There  was  no 
thought,  however,  of  organizing  a  separate  denomination,  the  object  being 
primarily  to  provide  a  church  home  for  the  community,  a  place  for  the  adminis- 
tration of  the  ordinances,  and  for  the  teaching  of  Christian  ethics. 

Under  the  labors  of  Elder  Palmer  and  other  ministers  whom  he  ordained, 
additional  churches  were  organized,  which  grew  rapidly,  considering  the  sparsely 
settled  country,  and  an  organization  was  formed,  called  a  yearly  meeting,  includ- 
ing 16  churches,  16  ministers,  and  probably  1,000  communicants,  in  1752.  As 
the  Philadelphia  Association  of  Calvinistic  Baptists  increased  in  strength,  a 
considerable  number  of  these  Arminian  churches  were  won  over  to  that  confes- 
sion, so  that  only  four  remained  undivided.  These,  however,  rallied,  reorganized, 
and,  being  later  reinforced  by  Free  Will  Baptists  from  the  North,  especially 
from  Maine,  regained  most  of  the  lost  ground. 

In  the  early  part  of  their  history  they  do  not  appear  to  have  had  a  distinctive 
name.  They  were  afterward  called  "Free  Will  Baptists,"  and  most  of  them 
became  known  later  as  "Original  Free  Will  Baptists."  They  were  so  listed  in 
the  report  on  religious  bodies,  census  of  1890,  but  have  since  preferred  to  drop 
the  term  "Original"  and  be  called  simply  "Free  Win  Baptists." 

In  1836  they  were  represented  by  delegates  in  a  General  Conference  of  Free 
Will  Baptists  throughout  the  United  States,  but  after  the  Civil  War  they  held 
their  own  conferences.  In  recent  years  they  have  drawn  to  themselves  a  number 
of  churches  of  similar  faith  throughout  the  Southern  States,  and  have  increased 
greatly  in  strength.  They  hold  essentially  the  same  doctrines  as  the  Free 
Baptist  churches  of  the  North,  now  a  part  of  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention, 
have  the  same  form  of  ecclesiastical  polity,  and  are  to  some  degree  identified 
with  the  same  interests,  missionary  and  educational. 

As  the  movement  for  the  union  of  the  Free  Baptist  churches  with  the  Northern 
Baptist  Convention  developed,  some  who  did  not  care  to  join  in  that  movement 
affiliated  with  the  Free  Will  Baptists. 

DOCTRINE 

The  Free  Will  Baptists  accept  the  five  points  of  Arminianism  as  opposed  to 
the  five  points  of  Calvinism,  and  in  a  confession  of  faith  of  18  articles  de- 
clare that  Christ  "freely  gave  himself  a  ransom  for  all,  tasting  death  for  every 
man";  that  "God  wants  all  to  come  to  repentance";  and  that  "all  men,  at  one 
time  or  another,  are  found  in  such  capacity  as  that,  through  the  grace  of  God, 
they  may  be  eternally  saved." 

Believers'  baptism  is  considered  the  only  true  principle,  and  immersion  the  only 
correct  form;  but  no  distinction  is  made  in  the  invitation  to  the  Lord's  Supper, 
and  Free  Will  Baptists  uniformly  practice  open  communion.  They  further 
believe  in  foot  washing  and  anointing  the  sick  with  oil. 

ORGANIZATION 

In  polity  the  Free  Will  Baptists  are  distinctly  congregational.  Quarterly  con- 
ferences for  business  purposes  are  held  in  which  all  members  may  participate. 
The  officers  of  the  church  are  the  pastor,  clerk,  treasurer,  deacons,  who  have 
charge  of  the  preparations  for  the  communion  service  and  care  for  the  poor,  and 
elders,  who  care  for  the  spiritual  interests  of  the  churches  and  settle  controversies 
between  brethren.  The  quarterly  conferences  are  united  in  State  bodies,  vari- 
ously called  conferences  or  associations,  and  there  is  an  annual  conference  repre- 
senting the  entire  denomination. 

*  No  revision  of  history,  doctrine,  or  organization  was  furnished  by  this  body  for  1936,  hence  this  state- 
ment is  the  same  as  that  published  in  Religious  Bodies,  vol.  n,  1926.  No  data  are  available  for  "Work"  in 
1936. 


UNITED  AMERICAN  FREE  WILL  BAPTIST  CHURCH 

(COLORED) 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  tlie  "(Tinted  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  United  American  Free  Will  Baptist  Church 
(Colored)  for  the  year  1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  dis- 
tribution of  these  figures  between  urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  persons  who  have  been 
admitted  to  the  local  churches  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by  immersion. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES   IN   URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  * 

Urban 

Rural 

Ch.urch.6s  (local  organizations),  number 

226 

19,  616 
87 

6,056 
13,  560 

44.7 

2,292 
16,973 
351 
11.9 

208 
207 
$468,883 
$459,  650 
$9,  233 
$2,265 
20 
$18,  812 
167 

2 
1 
$2,000 

226 
$79,  712 
$34,  842 
$5,  671 
$11,044 

$4,778 

$6,230 
$3,  796 
$2,  079 
$42 
$7,  223 
$4,  007 
$353 

52 

6,770 
130 

2,038 
4,732 
43.1 

819 
5,776 
175 
12.4 

48 
47 
$165,  325 
$164,  950 
$375 
$3,  518 
10 
$15,  751 
33 

174 

12,846 

74 

4,018 
8,828 
45.5 

1,473 
11,  197 
176 
11.6 

160 
160 
$303,  558 
$294,  700 
$8,  858 
$1,897 
10 
$3,  061 
134 

2 

1 
$2,000 

174 
$52,  194 
$24,  117 
$3,  523 
$8,328 

$1,504 

$3,275 
$2,297 
$1,402 
$42 
$5,  127 
$2,679 
$300 

23.0 
34.5 

77.0 
65.5 

Members,  number  

Average  m&mbership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male  

33.7 
34.9 

66.3 
65.1 

Female...       _      ._          __      __       

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years  ..    

35.7 
34.0 
49.9 

64.3 
66.0 
50.1 

13  years  and  over.  __    .__ 

Age  not  reported  ___  .     _  

Percent  under  13  years  2 

ChijtYs^  fidifloAS,  Ttumber                    ^ 

23.1 
22.7 
35.3 
35.9 
4.1 

76  9 
77.3 
64  7 
64.1 
95.9 

Value  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported 

Constructed  prior  to  1936 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church  

Debt  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported  

83.7 
19.8 

16.3 
80.2 

jSTriTtibp-r  reporti'njj  "no  de-ht" 

Parsonages,  number.         ~                  .. 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

100.0 

77.0 
65.5 
69.2 
62.1 
75.4 

31.5 

52.6 
60.5 
67.4 

Expenditures  : 

Churches  reporting,  number 

52 

$27,  518 
$10,  725 
$2,  148 
$2,  716 

$3,274 

$2,  955 
$1,499 
$677 

23.0 

34.5 
30.8 
37.9 
24.6 

68.5 

47.4 
39.5 
32.6 

Amount  reported                                    .  „ 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  amd  im  pro  vflm  Ants       ^  _         r 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest    

Local  relief  and  charity,  Bed  Cross,  etc... 

JToTn«  misfsfnns 

Foreign  missions  

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.. 
All  other  purposes  

$2,096 
$1,428 
$529 

29.0 
35.6 

71.0 
64.4 

Average  expenditure  per  church  

*  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

176 


UNITED   AMEBIOAN   FREE  WILL  BAPTIST   CHURCH 


177 


TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR   CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 

In  rural 

PERCE* 
TOT 

*TOr 
AL1 

Urban 

Rural 

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  number 

200 

50 

150 

25.0 

75.0 

Officers  and  teachers. 

1,535 

437 

1,098 

28.5 

71.5 

Scholars 

8  317 

2,734 

5,583 

32.9 

67.1 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

3 

2 

1 

Officers  ancTteachers 

31 

17 

14 

Scholars 

115 

80 

35 

69.6 

30.4 

Weekday  religious  schools  : 
Ohiirohea  reporting,  nnrnhftr 

4 

1 

3 

Officers  and  "teachers 

29 

9 

20 

Scholars  

295 

45 

250 

15.3 

84.7 

i  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  United  American  Free  Will 
Baptist  Church  (Colored)  for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906.  In 
1916  this  body  was  reported  under  the  name  of  Colored  Free  Will  Baptists. 

TABLE  2. — COMPAEATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Gh.TU""'hft8  Onftft!  organizations),  irnrnbftr 

226 

166 

169 

247 

Increase  *  over  preceding  census: 
"Nllinhflr 

60 

—3 

—78 

Percent      .__    

36.1 

—1.8 

-31  6 

19,  616 

13,  396 

13,  362 

14,  489 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

6,220 

34 

—1,  127 

Percent                         -        

46.4 

0.3 

-7.8 

Average  rnernbership  per  church 

87 

81 

79 

59 

Church  *?difllofis,  nnrnber 

208 

144 

164 

152 

Value  —  number  reporting 

207 

142 

164 

151 

Amount  reported      _       __    

$468,883 

$308,  425 

$178,  385 

$79,  278 

Average  value  per  church                  -         

$2.  265 

$2,  172 

$1,088 

$525 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

20 

39 

35 

22 

Amount  reported    ** 

$18,  812 

$7,  962 

$9,  525 

$3,485 

Parsonages  number 

2 

Value  —  number  reporting              

1 

2 

6 

Amount  reported 

$2,  000 

$1,  300 

$1,  475 

Expenditures: 
Churches  reporting,  "nninber 

226 

158 

168 

Amount  reported                                 -  --  

$79,  712 

$67,  773 

$36,  647 

Pastors*  salaries 

$34,842 

1 

All  other  salaries 

$5,  671 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$11,  044 

>  $46,  494 

$27,  341 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  Interest.™ 
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest- 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Eed  Cross,  etc  —  
Home  missions         —  -         

$4,778 
$6,  230 
$3,  796 
$2,079 

j 

Foreign  missions                                  

$42 

>      $13,  090 

$9,306 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$7,223 

f 

All  other  purposes 

$4,007 

) 

Not  classified* 

$8,189 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$353 

$429 

$218 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

200 

144 

87 

100 

1,535 

836 

483 

382 

Scholars                                 -     

8,317 

5,077 

4,168 

3,307 

'A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


178 


CENSUS1   OF    RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  United  Ameri- 
can Free  Will  Baptist  Church  (Colored)  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each 
State  for  1936  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according 
to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and 
data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and 
membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936,  together 
with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years 
of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  church  edifices  and  the  amount 
of  debt  on  such  property  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  ex- 
penditures, showing  separately  current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences, 
etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics  of  any  individual  church, 
separate  presentation  in  tables  5  and  6  is  limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or 
more  churches  reported  value  and  expenditures. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  conference  in  the  United 
American  Free  Will  Baptist  Church  (Colored) ,  the  more  important  statistical  data, 
for  1936  shown  by  States  in  the  preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches, 
membership,  value  and  debt  on  church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NUMBER  OF 

NUMBER  OP 

MEMBERSHIP 

SUNDAY 

CHURCHES 

MEMBERS 

BY  SE3 

SCHOOLS 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 

fc,A 

S  M 

"     £ 

AND  STATE 

dfl 

CDn-)    CP 

w 

i—  . 

PI 

r-  1 

p2 

w     45 

n"£ 

«E3 

~ 

3 

s 

-S 

rQ 

g 

s 

<o  a  cfl 

^2  F! 

3& 

£*g 

e 

P 

rt 

S 

P 

tf 

s 

& 

a  p 

d£ 

O 

United  States...  

226 

52 

174 

19,  616 

6,770 

12,  846 

6,056 

13,  560 

44.7 

200 

1,535 

8,317 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

North  Carolina  

137 

?9 

108 

15,  679 

5,199 

10,  480 

4,729 

10,  950 

43.2 

125 

1,074 

6,454 

South  Carolina 

2 

2 

51 

51 

19 

32 

2 

11 

30 

Georgia  

54 

9 

45 

2,081 

580 

1,501 

679 

1,402 

48.4 

43 

231 

1,058 

Florida  

6 

4 

2 

305 

240 

65 

113 

192 

58.9 

6 

39 

131 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Kentucky 

1 

1 

38 

38 

14 

24 

Alabama 

1 

1 

50 

50 

10 

40 

1 

6 

26 

Mississippi 

4 

2 

2 

238 

186 

52 

72 

166 

43.4 

4 

26 

67 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Arkansas  -  

2 

2 

90 

90 

39 

51 

1 

8 

35 

Louisiana  

6 

5 

1 

430 

414 

16 

165 

265 

62.3 

5 

47 

183 

Texas  _- 

13 

3 

10 

654 

151 

503 

216 

438 

49.3 

13 

93 

333 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHtrBCBGEs,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 

BEESHIP  BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926,  1916,  or  1906] 


<3TATE 

NUMBER  OF  CHURCHES 

NUMBER  or  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,   1936 

1936 

1996 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Un- 
der 
13 
years 

13 

years 
and 
over 

Age 
not  re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
13i 

United  States  

niinois  

226 

166 

169 

247 

19,  616 

13,  396 

13,  362 

14,489 

2,292 

16,  973 

351 

11.9 

3 

241 
10,  773 
1,592 

North  Carolina 

137 
54 
6 

117 
31 

112 
35 

129 
93 
18 

6 

15,  679 
2,081 
305 

50 
238 
430 
654 

179 

11,  112 
1,391 

10,099 
3,680 
388 

272 

2,126 
41 
5 

13,  478 
2,040 
125 

75 

13.6 
2.0 
3.8 

Georgia 

Florida 

175 
50 

Alabama         . 

1 
4 
6 
13 

6 
5 

7 

—  ._ 
8 

300 
189 
404 

Mississippi 

290 
276 

1 
46 
62 

11 

237 
384 
592 

117 

.4 
12.0 
9.5 

8.6 

Louisiana        , 

Texas 

Other  States  

25 

4 

1 

190 

50 

51 

i  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

*  Includes:  South  Carolina,  2;  Kentucky,  1;  and  Arkansas,  2. 


UNITED'   AMERICAN    FREE    WILL   BAPTIST   CHURCH 


179 


TABLE  5. — VALUE   OF    CHURCHES   AND    AMOUNT    OF    CHURCH    DEBT   BY 

STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


STATE 

Total 
number  of 
churches 

Number 
of  church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

226 

208 

207 

$468,  883 

381,  250 
52,850 
8,200 
6,433 
3,625 
13,  525 

3,000 

20 

8 
5 
2 
3 
1 
1 

318,812 

15,  850 
1,467 
368 
843 
25 
259 

North  Carolina 

137 
54 
6 
4 
6 
13 

fi 

135 
45 
6 
4 
5 
10 

3 

135 
45 
5 
4 
5 
10 

13 

Georgia  

Florida  

tV3  ississippi  

Louisiana  

Texas...  

Other  States  

1  Includes:  South  Carolina,  1;  Kentucky,  1;  and  Alabama,  1. 

TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 

salaries 

Repairs 
and 
improve- 
ments 

United  States 

226 

226 

$79,  712 

$34,842 

$5,  671 

$11,044 

North  Carolina  - 

137 
54 
6 
4 
6 
13 

6 

137 
54 
6 
4 
6 
13 

i  6 

55,440 
14,005 
2,244 
1,450 
1,  363 
4,325 

885 

23,222 

6,898 
1,081 
453 
820 
1,958 

410 

4,472 
433 
150 
166 
129 
156 

165 

7,005 
2,741 
224 
232 
137 
645 

60 

Georgia    

Florida  

Mississippi.  - 

Louisiana 

Texas  

Other  States.    

vSTATE 

EXPENDITURES—  continued 

Pay- 
ment on 
church 
debt, 
exclud- 
ing in- 
terest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local  re- 
lief and 
charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral 
head- 
quarters 

All 
other 
purposes 

United  States  

$4,  778 

86,230 

$3,796 

$2,  079 
_ 

772 
43 
24 
95 
152 

45 

$42 
_— 

$7,223 

6,050 
650 
137 
189 
63 
60 

71 

$4,  007 

2,734 
839 
90 
]9 
32 
167 

126 

North  Carolina  ,   .     

3,398 
344 
290 
201 

4,910 
677 
97 
145 
20 
381 

2,671 
651 
132 
21 
67 
249 

5 

Georgia        .     

Florida 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas         .        

545 

12 

Other  States 

1  Includes:  South  Carolina,  2;  Kentucky,  1;  Alabama,  1;  and  Arkansas,  2. 
275318—41 13 


ISO 


CENSUS   OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBEESHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  CONFERENCES, 
1936 


o 

h 

eo  cfi 

a 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHURCH 

EDIFICES 

EXPENDI- 
TUEEvS 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

01 

1 

• 

, 

A 

CONFEKENCE 

S3  % 

£„„ 

£„, 

sw 

2Kn 

«-s 

*3 

£ 

rQ 

it 

1 

H 

I 

sa 
P 

fl 

II 

CO 

£ 

s 

3  £• 

£» 

Sft 

o 

o 

3 

.a 

a 

A 

»CJ 

a 

rCJ 

EH 

£ 

O 

4 

0 

^ 

Q 

0 

0 

02 

Total  

226 

19,  616 

207 

$468,  883 

20 

$18,812 

226 

$79,  712 

200 

8,317 

Cape  Fear 

16 

1,416 

16 

47,  000 

16 

4,  958 

12 

413 

Georgia  HI  astern 

11 

271 
280 

6 
9 

9,750 
9,000 

2 

1,140 

7 
11 

3,624 
1,  248 

6 

8 

141 
134 

Mount  Hosea 

Northeast  of  North  Carolina  _. 

51 

6,174 

49 

115,  800 

5 

1,550 

51 

20,008 

48 

3,282 

Northwest  of  North  Carolina  ._ 

67 

7.8S9 

67 

215,  650 

3 

14,  300 

67 

29,  765 

62 

2,659 

Southern 

18 

834 

15 

19,  200 

2 

267 

18 

4,541 

16 

371 

Southwest                         

17 

691 

14 

15,  400 

1 

60 

17 

4,497 

12 

404 

Texas 

9 

470 

6 

6,525 

9 

3,171 

9 

238 

Unassociated  

30 

1,591 

25 

30,  558 

7 

1,  495 

30 

7,902 

27 

675 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  ' 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

For  some  years  after  the  Civil  War  the  lines  between  the  white  and  colored 
Free  Will  Baptist  churches  in  the  Southern  States  seem  not  to  have  been  drawn 
very  sharply.  As,  however,  the  latter  increased  in  number  and  in  activity,  there 
arose  among  them  a  desire  for  a  separate  organization.  Their  ministers  and 
evangelists,  together  with  others,  had  gathered  a  number  of  churches  in  North 
Carolina,  Georgia,  Alabama,  and  Florida,  and  had  met  with  such  success  that  in 
1901  they  were  organized  as  a  separate  denomination.  While  ecclesiastically 
distinct,  these  Negro  Baptists  are  in  close  relation  with  the  white  Free  Will  Baptist 
churches  of  the  Southern  States,  and  trace  their  origin  to  the  early  Arminian 
Baptist  churches  of  the  Carolinas  and  Virginia  and  the  Free  Baptist  movement  in 
New  England. 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

In  doctrine  the  United  American  Free  Will  Baptists  (Colored)  are  in  sub- 
stantial agreement  with  the  white  churches  of  the  same  faith.  In  polity  the  local 
churches  are  not  as  completely  autonomous  as  is  the  case  in  the  other  Free  Will 
Baptist  bodies.  The  denomination  has  a  system  of  quarterly,  annual,  and 
general  conferences,  with  a  graded  authority.  Thus,  while  the  local  church  is 
independent  so  far  as  concerns  its  choice  of  officers,  its  government,  and  the 
transaction  of  its  business,  any  doctrinal  question  which  it  cannot  decide  is 
taken  to  the  district  quarterly  conference  or  to  the  annual  conference.  The 
district  conference  has  no  jurisdiction  over  the  individual  members  of  the  local 
church,  but  can  labor  with  the  church  as  a  body  and  exclude  it  from  fellowship. 
In  the  same  way  the  annual  conference,  sometimes  called  an  "association," 
has  authority  in  matters  of  doctrine  over  the  district  or  quarterly  conference; 
and  the  general  conference  has  similar  jurisdiction  over  the  annual  conference. 
The  general  conference  has  also  supervision  over  the  denominational  activities 
of  the  church,  including  missions,  education,  and  Sabbath  school  work,  and 
general  movements,  as  those  for  temperance,  moral  reform,  and  Sabbath 
observance. 


'  No  revision  of  history,  doctrine,  or  organization  was  furnished  by  this  body  for  1936,  hence  this  statement 
is  the  same  as  that  published  in  Religious  Bodies,  vol.  II,  1926.    No  data  are  available  for  "Work"  in  1936. 


GENERAL 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  General  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is  presented 
in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between  urban  and 
rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have  been 
admitted  to  the  local  churches  (by  vote  of  the  members)  upon  profession  of 
faith  and  baptism  (by  immersion). 

TABLE    1. — SUMMARY   OF   STATISTICS   FOR   CHURCHES   IN   URBAN   AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEECENT  OF 
TOTAL  * 

Urban 

Rural 

Ch.urch.es  (local  organizations),  number 

422 

30,  573 
87 

11,  387 
17,  265 
7,921 
66.0 

5,652 
24,786 
6,135 
IS.  6 

316 
297 
$555,  309 
$543,762 
$11,  547 
$1,870 
29 
$26,  365 
150 

17 
16 
$31,  000 

406 
$103,  799 
$49,  148 
$9,456 
$16,  302 

$4,571 

$10,  304 
$1,303 
$1,935 
$903 
$3,059 
$6,818 
$256 

42 

4,713 
112 

1,798 
2,775 
140 
64.8 

262 
3,873 
578 
6.3 

33 
31 
$169,  260 
$168,760 
$500 
$5,460 
11 
$18,  205 
13 

6 
6 
$12,  400 

39 
$39,  121 
$15,  352 
$3,378 
$7,  690 

$3,692 

$4,843 
$627 
$501 
$622 
$730 
$1,  686 
$1,003 

380 

31,  860 
84 

9,589 
14,  490 
7,781 
66.2 

5,390 
20,913 
5,557 
20.5 

283 
266 
$386,049 
$375,002 
$11,047 
$1,  451 
18 
$8,160 
137 

11 
10 
$18,600 

367 

$64,  678 
$33,796 
$6,078 
$8,612 

$879 

$5,461 
$676 
$1,434 
$281 
$2,329 
$5,  132 
$176 

10.0 
12.9 

90.0 
87.1 

MfirnhfiF*?  ,  TUTrnhpT                T    ^  ^                 „        „„,„,„  ^  ,  „ 

Av6FBg6  membership  p6r  chTirofo 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

15.8 
16.1 
1.8 

84.2 
83.9 
98.2 

Female  

Sex  not  reported         _         

Mal^s  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years    

4.6 
15.6 
9.4 

95.4 
84.4 
90.6 

13  years  and  over         

Age  not  reported 

Percent  under  13  years2 

Church,  edifices,  number            _            -            

10.4 
10.4 
30.5 
31.0 
4.3 

89.6 
89.6 
69.5 
69.0 
95.7 

Value  —  nuinhfir  reporting 

Amount  reported  _-    

Constructed  prior  to  1936    

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church 

Defrt;  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported--  _«»__ 

69.0 
"8.7 

31,0 
91.3 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

ppTsnnagfif!,  tnrmhp.r 

Value  —  number  reporting 

ArnooTlt  f^portftfl 

40.0 

9.6 

37.7 
31.2 
35.7 
47.2 

80.8 

47.0 
48.1 
25.9 
68.9 
23.9 
24.7 

60.0 

90.4 
62.3 
68.8 
64.3 
52.8 

19.2 

53.0 
51.9 
74.1 
31.1 
76.1 
75.3 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

Amount  reported 

Pastors'  salaries   ~~ 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  and  improvements    

Payment    on    church    debt,    excluding 
interest 

All   other   current   expenses,   including 
interest               

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc... 
Home  missions      

foreign  missions  .  .  „  ,  „  .     ^  ,   ,„,--, 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.- 
All  other  purposes 

Average  excenditure  t>er  church  

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

z  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


181 


182 


CENSUS    OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1930 


TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF   STATISTICS    FOR   CHURCHES  IN   URBAN  AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Kural 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

aoi 

2,651 
17,  562 

21 
125 
880 

5 
14 
152 

1 
3 
39 

33 

458 
3,835 

6 

54 

475 

1 
1 
37 

268 
2,193 
13,727 

15 
71 
405 

4 
13 
115 

1 
3 

39 

11.0 
17.3 
21.8 

89.0 
82.7 
78.2 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools: 
Oh^rnlips  reporting,  TW'm'hQr 

Oflfifiws  ayid  t*w/h^rp 

43.2 
54.0 

56  8 
46.0 

Scholars 

Weekday  religious  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars    -  

24.3 

75.7 

Parochial  schools  : 

Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

i  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data>  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  General  Baptists  for  the 
census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,   1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organ1  zat-ions)  ,  niTrnber           ^             , 

422 

465 

517 

518 

Increase  1  over  preceding  census: 
Number                                    -         

-43 

-52 

__i 

Percent                                                   -       

-9.2 

-10.1 

—0.2 

Members,  number         _      __       _  _«  _  . 

36,  573 

31,  501 

33,  466 

30,  097 

Increase  1  over  preceding  census 
Number                                  _    -    --  _.  

5,072 

-1,  965 

3,369 

Percent                     _.      -_      -         

16.1 

-5.9 

11.2 

AvfirRgft  membership  par  rfrnrnh 

87 

68 

65 

58 

Church  edifices,  number 

316 

354 

390 

380 

Valti£  —  number  reportinp'                                  

297 

353 

390 

380 

Amount  reported        -      

$555,  309 

$706,  325 

$421,  837 

$252,  019 

Average  value  per  church  .  _    

$1,  870 

$2,  001 

$1,  082 

$663 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

29 

18 

32 

28 

Amount  reported 

$26,  365 

$22,  823 

$17,  362 

$6,  999 

Parsonages,  number 

17 

10 

6 

6 

Value  —  number  reporting-      ,  .  

16 

10 

6 

6 

Amount  reported              --  -.  

$31,  000 

$35,  000 

$11,  100 

$8,  900 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

406 

440 

424 

Amount  reported 

$103,  799 

$113,  825 

$64,  698 

Pastors'  salaries  _    .  _      ._  

$49,  148 

All  other  salaries       _  

$9,  456 

Rfipfvir?  $.r\(\  imprnwmpTit.s 

$16,  302 

$95  792 

$56,  683 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest.  .. 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Bed  Cross,  etc  

$4,571 
$10,  304 
$1.  303 

1 

Home  missions                         ..    - 

$1,  935 

'FoTftigT)  "mfgfdoms      ,        -„„.,,   -„„„  +  ,, 

$903 

>     $17,  181 

$8,  015 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$3,  059 

All  other  purposes.    ,_ 

$6,  818 

j 

Not  classified                      ........ 

$852 

Average  expenditure  per  church                        _  __ 

$256 

$259 

$153 

Sunday  schools: 

Chtirohes  reporting,  TnjTn"h£i- 

301 

295 

305 

230 

Officers  and  teachers 

2,  651 

2,  064 

2,140 

1,520 

Scholars.    

17,  562 

18,  797 

18,  545 

11,  658 

J  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


GENERAL  BAPTISTS 


183 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  General  Bap- 
tists by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  member- 
ship of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  terri- 
tory, membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives  the 
number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936, 
together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and 
"13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  churches  and  parsonages 
and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936, 
the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improvements, 
benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics  of  any 
individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  table  5  is  limited  to  those  States  in 
which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  of  the  General 
Baptist  churches,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States 
in  the  preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and 
debt  on  church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OP  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGEAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBEE  OF 
CHUECHES 

NUMBEE  OF  MEM- 
BEES 

MEMBEESHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

O 

fl 
£ 

"3 
f-i 

i 

a 

CS 

1 

1 

42 

Female 

*, 

•gs 

*! 

Males  per  100 
females  l 

Churches  re- 
porting 

O 

Scholars 

United  States.  

422 

64 
1 

139 
5 

42 

380 

36,  573 

4,713 

31,  860 

4,188 
3,103 

11,  387 

17,  265 

7,921 

66.0 

301 

55 
45 
1 

94 

4 

61 
12 

20 
9 

2,651 

17,  582 

EAST  NOETH  CENTEAL: 
Indiana  _ 

13 
9 

1 

6 

51 
49 

133 
5 

86 

18 

30 

6,648 
3,816 
166 

12,  608 
88 

9,665 
1,479 

1,528 

2,460 
713 
166 

315 

859 

41 

2,459 
1,416 
72 

2,294 
43 

3,771 
505 

629 
198 

3,975 
2,163 
94 

3,557 

45 

5,448 
761 

897 
325 

214 
237 

61.9 
65.5 

687 
430 
10 

777 
25 

428 

81 

154 
59 

5,024 
2,445 
119 

4,670 
119 

2,989 
689 

1,014 
493 

Illinois 

Michigan 

WEST  NOKTH  CENTEAL: 
Missouri 

12,  293 

88 

8,806 
1,438 

1,528 
416 

6,757 

64  5 

Nebraska 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTEAL: 
Kentucky 

7 
1 

446 
213 

2 
52 

69  2 

66  4 

70.1 
60.9 

Tennessee 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTEAL- 
Arkansas 

Oklahoma    „ 

13 

5 

8 

575 

159 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

TABLE  4.- — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OP  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BT  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBEE  OF 
CHUECHES 

NUMBEE  OF  MEMBEES 

MEMBEESHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Under 
13 
years 

13 
years 
and 
over 

Age 
not  re- 
port- 
ed 

Per 
cent 
un- 
der 
13i 

United  States  
Indiana 

422 

465 

517 

518 

73 

48 

36,  573 

6,648 
3,816 
166 

31,  501 

6,978 
4,126 

83,466 

30,  097 

5,652 

24,  786 

5,602 
3,276 
166 
5*,  451 
57 

7,364 
912 
1,467 
491 

6,135 

662 
521 

18.6 

64 
58 
1 

73 
60 

77 
62 

7,497 
4,410 

6,671 
3,621 

384 
19 

6  4 
.6 

Illinois 

Missouri 

139 

5 

93 
19 
30 
13 

138 

7 

108 
27 
35 
16 
1 

168 
9 

108 
32 
36 
25 

186 
6 

98 
27 
54 
26 

12,608 
88 

9,665 
1,479 
1,528 
575 

6,936 
102 

9,151 

1,750 
1,898 
494 
66 

8,857 
244 

8,663 
1,789 
1,227 
779 

9,048 
103 

6,881 
1,108 
2,  035 
630 

5,132 

8 

79 
7 
21 
2 

2,025 
23 

2,222 
560 
40 
82 

48.5 

1.1 

.8 
1.4 
.4 

Nebraska 

Kentucky 

Tennessee  

Arkansas  

Oklahoma    

California 

i  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported:  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


184 


CENSUS'  OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHUECH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 

EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

422 

316 

297 
«- 

50 
77 
74 
18 
18 

24 

$555,309 

243,650 
59,  016 
80,750 
135,386 
16,  607 
11,200 

8,700 

29 

T 

4 
7 
5 
3 
2 

1 

826,865 

7,594 
1,984 
4,644 
8,230 
1,013 
1,000 

1,900 

16 

$31,000 

Indiana 

64 
58 
139 
93 
19 
30 

19 

61 
52 
84 
79 
18 
18 

4 

12 

26,  200 

Illinois 

Missouri 

2 
1 
1 

8 

C1) 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Arkansas 

Other  States 

4,800 

1  Amount  included  in  figures  for  "Other  States,"  ,to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual 
church, 
a  Includes:  Michigan,  1;  Nebraska,  1;  and  Oklahoma,  2. 

TABLE  6. — CHDRCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 


Total 
number 

of 
churches 


EXPENDITURES 


Churches 
reporting 


Total 
amount 


Pastors' 

salaries 


All  other 
salaries 


Repairs  and 
improve- 
ments 


United  States. 


Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan.. 
Missouri.  - 
Nebraska.. 


Kentucky. . 
Tennessee.. 
Arkansas... 
Oklahoma.. 


406 


$103,799 


L9, 148 


$9,458 


64 
58 

1 
139 

5 

93 
19 
30 
13 


64 

57 

1 

131 
5 

91 
18 
30 


46,611 
1 15, 776 

16,227 
569 

17, 953 
3,769 


265 


21,399 
7,332 

7,988 
406 

8,727 

1,590 

1,573 

133 


4,746 


1,470 
75 

1,569 

472 

280 

5 


4,503 

680 

166 

6 


STATE 


EXPENDITURES— continued 


Payment 
on  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 


Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 


Local 
relief  and 
charity 


Home 

missions 


Foreign 
missions 


To  gen- 
eral head- 
quarters 


All  other 
purposes 


United  States.. 


Indiana.  ~ 

Ulinois 

Michigan. 
Missouri- , 
Nebraska- 


Kentucky.... 
Tennessee... 


Oklahoma.. 


$4, 571 


$10, 804 


2,676 
448 
764 


E30 
332 
21 


6,367 

1,837 

1,034 

52 

76J5 
113 
136 


S3,  059 


$8,  818 


630 
74 
49 


124 

117 
80 


185 
85 
176 


679 

543 

4 

513 
78 
113 


2,450 

1,427 

1,396 
32 

1,138 
291 
57 
27 


i  Amount  for  Michigan  combined  with  figures  for  Illinois,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  indi- 
vidual church. 


GENERAL  BAPTIST'S 


185 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHTJECH  EDI- 
FICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHTJECH  EDI- 
FICES 

EXPENDITT7BES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

fl 
< 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Scholars 

Total 

422 

36,  573 

297 

8555,809 

2,850 
1,600 
35,  600 
7,550 

4,200 
10,600 
4,000 
154,  800 
1,500 

21,100 
10,  600 
26,400 
14,  100 
19,600 

29 

$26,  365 

406 

$103,799 

301 

17,  582 

378 
195 
215 
1,001 
380 

225 

350 
110 
2,302 
174 

700 
852 
1,164 
626 
681 

84 

1,496 
154 
35 
549 

75 
30 
465 
330 
1,235 

1,269 
1,579 
143 
423 
207 
135 

Cherokee  Home  (Okla.) 

9 
6 
5 
21 
10 

8 
7 
4 
25 
5 

21 
34 
18 
16 
18 

4 

29 
8 
1 
14 

3 
10 
13 
15 
37 

27 
23 
5 
18 
6 
2 

467 
326 
180 
1,627 
529 

527 
5,446 
322 
3,207 
243 

2,319 
1,690 
1,322 
858 
1,608 

64 

2,077 
496 
24 
1,028 

81 
545 
1,073 
713 
4,230 

1,841 
2,200 
161 
674 
317 
378 

2 
3 
3 

17 
8 

6 
4 
3 
22 
3 

17 
17 
18 
13 
18 

7 
5 
5 
21 
10 

7 
7 
4 
25 
5 

21 
33 

18 
16 

17 

4 

29 
7 

1 

14 

1 
6 
13 
15 
36 

27 
22 
5 
17 
6 
2 

236 

672 
385 
6,611 
1,503 

391 
1,945 
415 
29,  169 
387 

2,761 
2,569 
6,386 
3,464 
2,578 

322 

5,002 
186 
(i) 

3,111 

0) 
314 
2,566 
1,098 
11,  301 

6,936 
11,  421 
284 
740 
315 
0) 

731 

6 
3 

4 
17 
6 

6 
6 
3 
22 

4 

13 
22 

17 
10 
12 

3 

26 
4 
1 
9 

2 
1 
9 
8 
25 

26 
14 
4 
12 
4 
2 

Eastern  Union  (Mo.) 

Fair  Dealing  (Mo.)  

Flat  Creek  (Ind.) 

1 

2,300 

Freedom  (Ind.,  Ky.)  
Free  Union  (Ky.)            

Galilee  (Mo.) 

1 

3,500 

Green  River  Union  (Ky.)  
Liberty  (111.,  Ind.) 

4 
1 

1 

3,814 
250 

100 

Little  Vine  (Ark.,  Mo.)  
Long  Creek  (Ky.)  

Missouri  (Ark.,  Mo.) 

Moark  (Ark.,  Mich.,  Mo.)-.. 
Mount  Olivet  (HI.)  

7 
1 
2 

3,394 
200 
2,030 

Mount  Union  (Ky.,  Tenn.)~. 
New  Hope  (Nebr.) 

New    Liberty    (Ky.,    Mo., 
Tenn.)  

27 
4 
1 
13 

29,907 
2,700 

(0 

18,  100 

4 

1,413 

North  Liberty  (Mo.) 

Northwest  Nebraska  (Nebr.). 
Ohio  (III.)  

2 

1,585 

Oklahoma  (Okla.) 

Old  Liberty  (HI.,  Mo.)  
Portland  (Ky.,  Tenn.) 

6 
7 
7 
32 

25 
13 
2 
2 
2 
2 

3,000 
8,700 
3,000 
87,  586 

28,016 
48,300 

8 

0) 
0) 

11,500 

Post  Oak  Grove  (Ark.) 

Union  (Ky.) 

2 

1 
2 

6,100 

199 
1,480 

Union  Grove  (Ind.,  HI.)  
United  (Ind.,  Ky.,  Mo.)  
West  Liberty  (Mo.) 

White  River  (Mo.,  Okla.) 

Wolf  Bayou  (Ark.) 

Unassociated  (Ky.,  Mo.)  
Combinations 

1  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  General,  or  Arminian,  Baptists  trace  their  origin  as  a  distinct  denomina- 
tion to  the  early  part  of  the  seventeenth  century.  Their  first  church  is  believed 
to  have  been  founded  in  Holland  in  1607  or  1610  and  their  first  church  in  England 
in  1611.  During  the  latter  half  of  the  seventeenth  and  the  first  half  of  the 
eighteenth  centuries  many  of  the  Baptist  churches  in  New  England  held  Arminian 
views,  and  early  in  the  eighteenth  century  there  were  also  a  number  of  General 
Baptists  in  Virginia.  These  sent  a  request  for  ministerial  aid  to  the  General 
Baptists  of  London,  in  answer  to  which  Robert  Nordin  was  sent  to  Virginia  In 
1714.  Nordin  is  supposed  after  his  arrival  to  have  organized  at  Burleigh  the 
first  Baptist  church  in  Virginia,  although  it  is  possible  that  he  found  it  already 

i  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  n  of  the  Report  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  J.  P.  Cox,  editor  and  publisher  of  The  General  Baptist  Messenger, 
Owensville,  Ind.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


186 

established.  Later  other  Baptist  churches  were  organized,  and  the  movement 
spread  into  North  Carolina,  where  a  flourishing  yearly  meeting  was  formed,  and 
to  other  colonies  of  the  South. 

As  the  Calvinistic  Baptists,  who  had  better  educated  and  more  aggressive 
leaders,  increased  in  numbers  and  strength,  the  majority  of  the  Arminian  Baptist 
churches,  both  in  New  England  and  the  South,  became  affiliated  with  them, 
although  the  General  Six  Principle  Baptists  of  New  England  and  a  small  body  of 
churches  in  the  Carolinas  continued  to  hold  the  doctrines  of  the  General  Baptists, 
Later  the  Free  Baptists  of  New  England,  who  held  essentially  the  same  principles, 
attracted  many  who  would  otherwise  have  formed  General  Baptist  churches. 
The  small  group  of  General  Baptist  churches  in  the  Carolinas,  being  reinforced 
by  Free  Baptists  from  the  North,  in  time  became  known  as  Free  Will  Baptists, 
and  included  most  of  those  holding  Arminian  views  in  that  section  of  the  country. 

The  historical  origin  of  those  Baptist  bodies  in  the  United  States  that  bear 
the  appellation  "General  Baptists"  at  the  present  time  is  somewhat  uncertain, 
but  it  seems  probable  that  they  represent  colonies  sent  to  the  Cumberland  region 
by  the  early  General  Baptist  churches  of  North  Carolina.  The  first  very  definite 
information  concerning  them  is  that  in  1823  a  General  Baptist  church  was  organ- 
ized in  Vanderburg  County,  Ind.,  by  Benoni  Stinson  and  others.  The  following 
year  Liberty  Association  was  organized  with  four  churches.  The  movement 
gradually  extended  to  Kentucky,  Illinois,  Tennessee,  Missouri,  Arkansas,  and 
Nebraska.  More  recently  churches  have  been  established  in  Oklahoma,  Cali- 
fornia, and  Michigan. 

Two  distinct  influences  appeared  early  in  these  churches,  one  for  greater 
denominational  emphasis,  the  other  for  union  with  other  Baptist  bodies,  such  as 
the  Free  Will  and  the  Separate  Baptists.  Various  efforts  for  such  union  were 
put  forth,  but  without  conspicuous  success.  One  association  united  with  the 
Free  Will  Baptists  in  1868,  but  withdrew  in  1877.  In  1881  two  associations  had 
a  conference  with  an  association  of  Missionary  Baptists,  as  they  were  called, 
to  distinguish  them  from  Antimissionary  or  Primitive  Baptists,  but  it  failed  to 
produce  results.  More  recently  a  union  with  a  Separate  Baptist  association 
caused  some  disturbance,  but  this  also  was  not  permanent.  Notwithstanding 
the  hindrances  attending  these  discussions,  the  denomination  has  made  progress, 
establishing  churches  and  organizing  missionary  societies  and  Sunday  schools. 
In  1915  the  General  Association  of  General  Baptists  formed  a  cooperative  union 
with  the  Northern  Baptist  Convention. 

DOCTRINE 

The  confession  of  faith  of  the  General  Baptists  consists  of  11  articles  which, 
with  but  two  slight  changes,  are  identical  with  those  formulated  by  Benoni 
Stinson  in  1823.  The  distinctive  feature  of  this  confession  is  the  doctrine  of  a 
general  atonement  (whence  the  name,  "General  Baptist"),  which  is  that  Christ 
died  for  all  men,  not  merely  for  the  elect,  and  that  any  failure  of  salvation  rests 
purely  with  the  individual.  Other  clauses  state  that  man  is  "fallen  and  de- 
praved," and  cannot  extricate  himself  from  this  state  by  any  ability  possessed 
by  nature;  that  except  in  the  case  of  infants  and  idiots,  regeneration  is  necessary 
for  salvation,  and  is  secured  only  through  repentance  and  faith  in  Jesus  Christ; 
that  while  the  Christian  who  endures  to  the  end  shall  be  saved,  it  is  possible  for 
him  to  fall  from  grace  and  be  lost;  that  rewards  and  punishments  are  eternal; 
that  the  bodies  of  the  just  and  unjust  will  be  raised,  the  former  to  the  resurrection 
of  life,  the  latter  to  the  resurrection  of  damnation;  that  the  only  proper  mode  of 
baptism  is  immersion,  and  the  only  proper  subjects  are  believers;  and  that  the 
communion,  or  Lord's  Supper,  should  be  free  to  all  believers.  Some  of  the 
churches  practice  foot  washing. 

ORGANIZATION 

In  polity  the  General  Baptists  are  in  accord  with  other  Baptist  bodies.  The 
local  churches  are  independent,  but  are  united  in  local,  State,  and  general  asso- 
ciations, of  advisory  character,  with  no  authority  over  the  individual  church. 
No  association  can  legally  form  an  organic  union  with  any  other  denomination 
without  the  ratification  of  each  individual  church,  and  any  local  church  wishing 
to  withdraw  from  any  association  may  do  so,  while  any  local  association  may 
withdraw  from  a  State  or  General  Association. 


GENERAL   BAPTISTS  187 

When  a  church  desires  the  ordination  of  one  of  its  members,  it  makes  recom- 
mendation to  a  body  composed  of  the  ordained  ministers  and  deacons  of  the 
various  local  churches,  corresponding  closely  to  the  councils  of  Congregational 
churches,  though  sometimes  called  a  presbytery.  This  body  conducts  an  ex- 
amination of  the  candidate  and,  if  he  is  found  worthy,  ordains  him,  acting  as 
the  representative  of  the  church.  It  has,  however,  no  authority  except  such 
as  is  given  to  it  by  the  local  church.  The  vote  of  the  local  church  on  the  recep- 
tion of  members  must  be  unanimous. 

In  1870  a  General  Association  was  organized  to  bring  "into  more  intimate  and 
fraternal  relation  and  effective  cooperation  various  bodies  of  liberal  Baptists." 
With  this  most  of  the  local  associations  are  connected  through  delegates.  While 
this  General  Association  is  a  General  Baptist  institution,  its  constitution  permits 
the  reception  of  other  Baptist  associations  whose  doctrines  and  usages  harmonize 
with  those  of  the  General  Baptists.  The  constitution  states  that  the  name  can 
never  be  changed,  and  that  no  less  than  three-fourths  of  its  trustees  shall  be 
members  of  General  Baptist  churches.  It  has  general  supervision  over  the 
college  and  educational  interests  of  the  denomination,  the  home  and  foreign 
mission  work,  publication  interests,  literature,  etc.  A  denominational  budget 
of  $6,000  is  called  for  each  year,  which  is  divided  among  the  denominational 
enterprises. 

A  home  mission  board  is  maintained  under  the  direction  of  the  general  asso- 
ciation, its  object  being  to  support  home  mjssionaries,  establish  churches  in  new 
fields,  assist  in  building  houses  of  worship,  etc.  There  are  37  local  associations, 
and  a  total  membership  of  38,000.  The  various  local  associations  also  have 
boards  which  do  similar  work  within  their  own  territory,  and  which  cooperate 
with  the  general  board.  The  home  mission  board  of  the  Liberty  Association  of 
Indiana  has  a  permanent  fund  of  several  thousand  dollars,  and  has  been  the 
means  of  advancing  the  interests  of  the  association  and  of  the  denomination  as 
much  perhaps  as  any  other  one  agency.  Largely  through  its  efforts  the  present 
publishing  house  of  the  denomination  was  established. 

For  many  years  the  General  Baptists  cooperated  with  the  Free  Baptists  in 
foreign  mission  work,  but,  since  this  was  found  to  be  not  entirely  satisfactory, 
a  foreign  missionary  society  was  organized  in  1904,  under  direction  and  control 
of  the  General  Association. 

Through  the  foreign  mission  board  work  is  now  being  carried  on  in  the  island 
of  Guam,  where  in  1936  there  were  several  stations,  occupied  by  a  native  mission- 
ary and  several  native  helpers.  There  are  about  75  members.  The  value  of 
property  belonging  to  the  denomination  in  foreign  fields  is  estimated  at  $10,000, 
and  there  is  an  endowment  of  $3,500. 

The  General  Baptists  have  one  educational  institution,  Oakland  City  College, 
in  Indiana,  which  includes  a  theological  department.  It  has  a  faculty  of  15 
teachers  and  an  average  attendance  of  about  250  students,  property  valued  at 
$100,000,  and  an  endowment  of  about  $250,000.  The  amount  contributed  for 
the  support  of  the  school  during  the  year  was  about  $20,000. 

The  General  Baptist  Messenger,  the  church  organ,  was  established  in  1886, 
and  has  assisted  largely  in  building  up  and  strengthening  the  denomination  and 
its  institutions.  It  is  now  published  at  Poplar  Bluff,  Mo. 

Sunday  schools,  women's  missionary  and  aid  societies,  and  Christian  Endeavor 
societies  are  maintained  in  many  of  the  churches. 


SEPARATE  BAPTISTS 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Separate  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is  presented 
in  table  *1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between  urban  and 
rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  includes  persons  who  have  been  admitted 
to  the  local  churches,  by  vote  of  the  members,  upon  their  acceptance  of  the 
articles  of  belief  and  baptism  by  immersion. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN   AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL   ! 

Urban 

Rural 

filmrchfiR  (local  orsft'n1  Cations),  number 

69 

5,  287 
77 

1,845 
2,718 
724 
67.9 

25 
3,660 
1,602 
0.7 

57 
52 
$66,  670 
$60,  920 
$5,  750 
$1,  282 
1 
$400 
34 

59 

$10,  553 
$4,371 
$354 
$3,  820 

$695 
$350 
$319 
$40 
$146 
$458 
$179 

55 
487 
2,932 

4 
15 
140 

4 

252 
63 

107 
145 

65 

5,  035 
77 

1,738 
2,573 
724 
67.5 

16 
3,417 
1,602 

Members,  number 

4.8 

95.2 

Average  membership  per  church-  

Membership  by  sex- 
Male  

5.8 
5.3 

94.2 
94.7 
100.0 

Female    .._  

Sex  not  reported                     -  _          

"M"f|,1p,s  par  3  QO  foymftlfts 

73.8 

9 
243 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

13  years  and  over 

6.6 

93.4 
100.0 

Age  not  reported  

Percent  under  13  years  2  

3  6 

3 
2 

$4,500 
$2,000 
$2,500 
$2,  250 

0.5 

54 
50 
$62,  170 
$58,  920 
$3,250 
$1,243 
1 
$400 
33 

55 

$9,979 
$4,  059 
$342 
$3,  720 

$613 
$350 
$309 
$40 
$146 
$400 
$181 

52 
449 
2,773 

4 
15 
140 

Church  edifices,  number    .                     ._.    

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reportlS 

6.7 
3  3 
43  5 

93.3 

96.7 
56.5 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  ._  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church.-    - 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

100.0 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

1 

4 
$574 
$312 
$12 

$ioo 

$82 

Expenditures  : 
Ohurches  reporting.,  nnmhAr 

AtnmiTit  reported 

5.4 
7.1 
3  4 
2.6 

11.8 

94.6 
92.9 
96.6 

97.4 

88.2 
100.0 
96.9 

Pastors"  salaries  

All  other  salaries  _         .    ._.    ____ 

Repairs  and  improvements 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  In- 
tejest 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc  
Home  missions  

$10 

3.1 

Foreign  missions    _.    .-  -  - 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

100.0 
87.3 

All  other  purposes  

$58 
$144 

3 

38 
159 

12.7 

Average  expenditure  per  church  ._  

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number    _    .  

Officers  and  teachers.  „ 

7,8 
5.4 

92.2 
94.6 

Scholars 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Officers  and  teachers  _  

Scholars  

100.0 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  Is  less  than  100. 
Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

188 


SEPARATE   BAPTISTS' 


189 


Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Separate  Baptists  for  the 
census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  STTMMAKY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number  _  

69 

65 

46 

73 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

1 

19 

—27 

Percent2  

Members,  number  „ 

5,287 

4,803 

4,254 

5,180 

Increase  *  over  preceding  census: 
Number  

184 

549 

—926 

Percent  . 

10.  1 

12  9 

—17  9 

Average  membership  per  church. 

77 

74 

92 

71 

CbiiroTK  fidificfts,  member 

57 

46 

41 

60 

Value  —  number  reporting  .. 

52 

43 

40 

59 

Amount  reported   ,  _._  _  _    -_      .._J__ 

$66,  670 

$63,  650 

$47,  565 

$66,  980 

Average  value  per  church..    .         ...  _ 

$1,  2S2 

$1,  480 

$1.  189 

$1,  135 

Debt  —  number  reporting       __     .  .  .  _ 

3 

2 

4 

Amount  reported- 

$400 

$110 

$380 

Parsonages,  number  

Value  —  number  reporting  .  _ 

1 

Amount  reported  . 

$1,  000 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

59 

41 

33 

ATYionnt  reported 

$10,  553 

$9,292 

$9  468 

Pastors'  salaries 

$4,  371 

All  other  salaries  

$354 

$7  799 

$8  005 

Repairs  and  improvements  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest.. 
Local  relief  and  charity.  Red  Cross,  etc  . 

$3,820 
$695 
$350 

TTornft  rnissions  r,           „     ^,_  .    ._„_     _,„,.,., 

$319 

Foreign  missions.            _       .       

$40 

I       $1,  368 

$i,  463 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.. 

$146 

All  other  purposes-   -                       . 

$-158 

Not  classified  _               .»  .            __ 

$125 

Average  expenditure  p^r  church     .. 

$179 

$227 

$287 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reDortin?,  number                  

55 

37 

30 

45 

Officers  and  teachers 

487 

259 

237 

312 

Scholars 

2.932 

1,782 

1,711 

1,962 

t  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Separate 
Baptists  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  mem- 
bership of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural 
territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4 
gives  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years  1906 
to  19?6,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of 
age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  church  edifices 
and  the  amount  of  debt  on  such  property  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936, 
the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improvements, 
benevolences,  etc. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  of  the  Separate 
Baptists,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States  in  the 
preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and  debt  on 
church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 


190 


CEOST'SIIS'   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND    MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

GEOGEAPHIC  DIVISION 

2 

§ 

£ 

a 

AND  STATE 

T3 

53  03 

03  Wl 

03  t-t 

o 

o£ 

^.9 

»2 

3 

1 

-a 
* 

1 

a 

cS 
.Q 

1 

"3 

ag 

ll 

n8- 

"3 

& 

P 

« 

EH 

i' 

rt 

^ 

fe 

CO 

^ 

0 

O 

0 
CQ 

United  States  

69 

4 

65 

5,287 

252 

5,035 

1,845 

2,718 

724 

67.9 

55 

487 

2,932 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 

Indiana 

14 

1 

13 

981 

63 

918 

419 

502 

60 

83  5 

13 

107 

583 

Illinois  

6 

2 

4 

460 

157 

303 

187 

273 

68.5 

4 

44 

145 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Kentucky 

39 

1 

38 

3,  198 

32 

3,166 

985 

1,f>4£> 

664 

63.6 

31 

283 

1,636 

Tennessee 

8 

8 

398 

398 

134 

264 

50.8 

6 

44 

388 

Alabama 

2 

2 

250 



250 

120 

130 

92  3 

1 

9 

180 

TABLE  4. — NUMBEK  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


NUM 

BEE  OJ 

?  CHUR 

CHES 

NUM 

BER  0] 

f  MEM 

BEES 

MEM! 

ERSHU 

?  BY  AG 

E,   1936 

STATE 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Un- 
der 
13 
years 

13 

years 
and 
over 

Age 
not 
re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
131 

United  States  

69 

65 

46 

73 

5,287 

4,803 

4,254 

5,180 

25 

3,660 

1,602 

o.r 

Indiana 

14 

18 

17 

24 

981 

1,640 

1,698 

2,201 

17 

753 

211 

2  2 

Illinois 

6 

9 

5 

15 

460 

541 

477 

1,076 

460 

Kentucky 

39 

28 

19 

28 

3,198 

2,078 

1,859 

1.765 

8 

1,999 

1,191 

.4 

Tennessee 

8 

10 

5 

6 

398 

544 

220 

138 

398 

Alabama 

2 

250 

50 

200 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 
TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH  DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 


STATE 

Total 
number  of 
churches 

Number  of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHUBCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHUKCH 
EDIFICES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

69 

57 

52 

866,  670 

1 

$400 

Indiana    ^^  ,    -  -__  „    J.J^, 

14 
6 
39 
8 
2 

14 
6 
31 
4 
2 

11 
6 
29 
4 
2 

19,  600 
14,  200 
28,790 

}       14,080 

Illinois  

Kentucky  „ 

Tennessee 

1 

400 

Alabama 

1  Amount  for  Alabama  combined  with  figures  for  Tennessee,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any 
individual  church. 


SEPARATE    BAPTISTS! 
TABLE  6. — CHUECH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 


191 


I 

EXPENDITURES 

s 

£ 

a 

68 

1 

«j 

r£ 

S 

STATE 

o 

J-l 
,0 

1 

^ 

S 

•S 

*! 

il 

*JS? 

I 

1 

A  m 

& 

M£? 

o 

w 

00 

i 

§^.*» 

-g'g 

& 

a 

*13 

a 

§ 

s 

-a 

1 

0 

n 

g|| 

d 

a 

1°* 

i 

o 

0 

,£3 

o 

<§ 

!T5 

o 

5  p<*9 

g 

0 

c$ 

o 

5=3 

0 

EH 

p^ 

^ 

« 

o 

^ 

w 

fr 

United  States  

69 

59 

S10,  553 

$4,  371 

$354 

$3,  820 

$695 

8350 

$319 

$40 

$146 

$458 

Indiana  _  

14 

14 

2,952 

L?55 

98 

962 

14S 

150 

106 

35 

27 

170 

Illinois 

6 

5 

1,129 

579 

94 

340 

77 

10 

15 

14 

Kentucky  -  

39 
8 
2 

31 

7 
2 

4,415 

2,349 

188 

162 

894 
1,624 

453 

.  16 

95 
95 

96 
102 

5 

116 
3 

245 
29 

Tennessee  

Alabama  _  

1  Amount  for  Alabama  combined  with  figures  for  Tennessee,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  indi- 
vidual church. 

TABLE  7.— NUMBER  AND  MEMBEESHIP  OF  CHTJECHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHUECH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITUEES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of  churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHUECH  EDI- 
FICES 

DEBT  ON 
CHTJRCH  EDI- 
FICES 

EXPENDI- 
TURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Scholars 

Total  

69 

6 
10 
8 
2 
12 
4 
27 

5,287 

52 

$68,  670 

1 

$400 

59 

5 
10 

7 

13 

/      4 
{    20 

$10,  553 

1,129 
2,486 
270 

3,636 
466 
2,566 

55 

=:;:==  .  . 

4 
9 
6 

{ii 

21 

2,932 

145 
379 
388 
180 
549 
204 
1,087 

A  rnbrftw 

460 
766 
398 
250 
1,702 
215 
1,496 

6 
9 
4 
2 
10 
2 
19 

14,200 
15,  300 
1,480 

JU7,200 
JUS,  490 

Central  Indiana 

Mount  Olivet 

Mount  Pleasant 

1 

400 

Nolynn      

North  Indiana.  

South  Kentucky  

1  Amount  for  Mount  Pleasant  combined  with  figures  for  Nolynn,  to  a  void  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any 
individual  church. 

2  Amount  for  North  Indiana  combined  with  figures  for  South  Kentucky,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  l 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  term  "Separate/'  as  applied  to  church,  bodies,  had  its  origin  in  what  is 
known  as  the  Separatist  Movement  in  England  toward  the  close  of  the  six- 
teenth century  and  early  in  the  seventeenth  century.  It  indicated  primarily  a 
withdrawing  from  the  Anglican  Church,  without  implying  any  specific  doctrinal 
or  ecclesiastical  character.  Among  the  churches  which  thus  withdrew  were 
some  distinctively  Baptist  churches,  though  the  first  definite  date  appears  to  be 
that  of  1662,  when  a  church  called  the  "English  Puritan  Separate  Baptist  Church" 
is  said  to  have  been  organized.  This,  in  common  with  some  of  the  other  inde- 
pendent churches,  was  compelled  to  emigrate  to  the  colonies  and  came  to  America 
in  1695. 

1  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Eeport  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  Eev.  J",  8.  Banta,  of  the  Separate  Baptists,  Grab,  Ky.,  and  approved  by 
him  in  its  present  form. 


192  CENStTS   OF  RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

In  the  early  part  of  the  eighteenth  century  a  somewhat  similar  condition  ex- 
isted in  New  England.  The  revival  movement  in  which  Whitefield  took  so 
prominent  a  part,  and  which  culminated  in  the  Great  Awakening,  caused  sharp 
discussion.  Those  who  endorsed  the  revival  were  called  "New  Lights,'  and  were 
opposed  bitterly  on  two  specific  points;  one  was  the  use  of  lay  preachers,  and  tne 
other  the  refusal  to  retain  on  church  rolls  those  who  were  regarded  by  _  them  as 
unregenerate  because  they  had  not  experienced  conversion.  Denominational 
lines  were  not  drawn,  both  the  Congregational  and  Presbyterian  churches,  the 
latter  under  the  lead  of  the  Tennents,  sharing  in  the  controversy,  which  resulted 
in  the  withdrawal  or  "separation"  of  a  number  of  churches.  In  all  of  these 
"separate"  churches  there  were  Baptists,  and  of  31  ministers  ordained  as  pas- 
tors from  1746  to  1751,  there  were  5  Baptists  before  they  were  ordained  and  8 
became  Baptists,  among  the  latter  being  Isaac  Backus,  the  famous  Baptist  theolo- 
gian and  historian.  These  Separate  Baptist  churches  were  distinguished  from  the 
Regular  Baptist  churches  by  their  milder  Calvinism  and  their  willingness  to  re- 
ceive those  who  practiced  infant  baptism,  even  though  they  themselves  preferred 
the  form  of  immersion.  As  a  result  the  Regular  Baptists  refused  to  recognize 
them  and  for  some  time  there  was  more  or  less  hostility  between  the  two  branches. 
This,  however,  gradually  disappeared,  and  in  New  England  the  two  bodies 
coalesced,  though  there  was  never  any  formal  act  of  union. 

Among  the  more  prominent  leaders  of  the  Separate  Baptists  was  Shubael 
Stearns,  a  native  of  Boston,  who  was  baptized  and  ordained  m  Tolland,  Conn. 
In  1754  he  left  New  England  and  settled  at  Sandy  Creek,  now  Randolph  County, 
N  C.,  where  he  made  his  permanent  residence.  With  him  had  come  8  families, 
16  persons  in  all,  and  there  the  same  year  he  organized  the  first  Separate  Bap- 
tist church  in  the  South.  Before  long  it  contained  606  members,  and  Darnel 
Marshall,  Samuel  Harris,  and  others  soon  became  influential  coworkers  with  Mr. 
Stearns.  In  17  years  the  southern  Separate  Baptists  had  spread  westward  to 
the  Mississippi,  southward  to  Georgia,  and  eastward  to  the  sea,  and  had  125 
ministers  and  42  churches.  Their  first  association,  the  Sandy  Creek,  was  organ- 
ized at  Stearns  Church  in  January  1758.  As  early  as  1776  they  were  found  in 
Kentucky,  and  in  1785  organized  the  South  Kentucky  Association,  which  is  still 
in  existence.  In  1815  they  crossed  into  Indiana  Territory,  established  a  church 
on  Indian  Creek,  and  in  1830  organized  the  Sand  Creek  Association.  The  first 
association  in  Illinois,  the  Shelby,  was  organized  in  1845,  and  the  Ambraw,  one 
of  their  strongest  associations,  was  formed  in  1869.  At  present  they  are  found  in 
Illinois,  Indiana,  Kentucky,  Tennessee,  and  Alabama. 

In  1787  the  Regular  and  Separate  Baptists  in  Virginia  formed  a  union,  adopt- 
ing the  name  "United  Baptist  Churches  of  Christ  in  Virginia/'  In  course  of  time 
similar  unions  were  formed  in  most  of  the  other  States  in  which  the  southern 
branch  of  the  Separate  Baptists  had  organizations.  A  few  Separate  Baptist 
churches,  however,  refused  to  join  in  this  movement,  and  have  maintained  dis- 
tinct organizations  until  the  present  time.  Owing  largely  to  difficulty  of  com- 
munication, some  practically  kindred  associations,  such  as  the  Duck  River 
Association  and  others  of  similar  character,  have  not  identified  themselves  with 
the  distinctive  Separate  Baptist  body.  Individual  members  of  these  associations 
have  expressed  their  willingness  to  be  classed  with  the  Separate  Baptists,  but 
no  official  action  in  that  direction  has  been  taken. 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

Separate  Baptists  reject  all  creeds  and  confessions  of  faith,  but  the  various 
associations  publish,  in  the  minutes  of  their  yearly  meetings,  articles  of  belief. 
These  are  not  always  worded  exactly  alike,  but  in  the  main  are  in  substantial 
agreement.  The  declaration  of  the  General  Association,  which  may  be  taken  as 
an  illustration,  emphasizes  the  Scriptures  as  the  infallible  Word  of  God,  the  only 
safe  rule  of  faith  and  practice;  the  existence  of  three  divine  personages  in  the 
Godhead;  and  three  ordinances — baptism,  the  Lord's  Supper,  and  feet  washing. 
The  immersion  of  believers  is  considered  the  only  proper  mode  of  baptism. 
They  hold  that  regeneration,  justification,  and  sanctification  take  place  through 
faith  in  the  life,  death,  resurrection,  ascension,  and  intercession  of  Christ;  that 
both  the  just  and  unjust  will  have  part  in  the  resurrection,  and  that  God  has 
appointed  a  day  in  which  He  will  judge  the  world  by  Jesus  Christ. 

The  strict  Calvinistic  doctrines  of  election,  reprobation,  and  fatality  have  never 
been  accepted  by  the  Separate  Baptist  churches,  the  special  points  of  emphasis 
in  their  preaching  being  the  general  atonement  of  Jesus  Christ  and  the  freedom  of 


SEPARATE   BAPTISTS 

salvation  for  all  who  will  come  to  Him  on  the  terms  laid  down  in  His  Word.  In 
the  statements  of  some  associations  the  doctrines  of  "adoption  by  the  Spirit  of 
God"  and  the  "perseverance  of  the  saints"  are  included.  The  Lord's  Supper 
is  observed  in  the  evening  and  is  regarded,  not  as  a  church  table,  but  the  Lord's 
table.  Each  one  who  partakes  is  expected  to  follow  the  scriptural  rule,  "Let  a 
man  examine  himself,  and  so  let  him  eat  of  that  bread  and  drink  of  that  cup." 
In  polity  the  Separate  Baptists  are  thoroughly  congregational,  recognizing  the 
autonomy  of  the  local  church,  the  purely  advisory  character  of  the  association, 
and  the  rights  of  the  individual  Christian. 

WORK 

In  the  line  of  home  missionary  work  each  association,  independent  of  any  other, 
conducts  its  own  work,  but  the  amount  of  money  expended  for  this  object  is  not 
reported.  No  provision  has  as  yet  been  made  for  foreign  missionary  work. 

Although  the  denomination  has  no  established  institution  of  learning,  educa- 
tion is  firmly  believed  in.  Sunday  schools  are  very  generally  maintained  through- 
out the  different  associations  and  are  usually  prosperous. 

The  denominational  paper,  The  Messenger,  is  published  at  Kokomo,  Ind. 


REGULAR  BAPTISTS 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification, — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Regular  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is  presented 
in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between  urban  and 
rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  includes  those  whose  names  are  enrolled 
as  communicants  on  the  local  church  registers,  upon  profession  of  faith  and 
baptism. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY   OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN   URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations)  number 

266 

17,186 
65 

5,952 
9,912 
1,322 
60  0 

59 
14,  691 
2,436 
0.4 

189 
173 
$234,  595 
$222,  220 
$12,  375 
$1,356 
16 
$3,318 
121 

6 
3 

$10,  100 

186 
$24,  023 
$5,  709 
$1,  263 
$4,584 

$6,  330 

$3,  315 

$768 
$216 
$935 
$903 
$129 

54 
402 
3,358 

4 
28 
322 

16 

1,629 
102 

522 
829 
278 
63.0 

45 
1,140 
444 
3.8 

12 
11 
$60,  500 
$58,  500 
$2,  000 
$5,  500 
2 
$1,835 
6 

1 
1 
$6,000 

15 
$6,841 
$2,507 
$424 
$455 

$660 

$1,  510 
$286 
$70 
$558 
$371 
$456 

8 
83 
870 

1 
19 

97 

250 

15,  557 
62 

5,430 
9,083 
1,044 
59  8 

14 
13,  551 
1,992 
0.1 

177 
162 
$174,  095 
$163,720 
$10,  375 
$1,  075 
14 
$1,483 
115 

5 
2 

$4,  100 

171 
$17,  182 
$3,  202 
$839 
$4,  129 

$5,  670 

$1,805 
$482 
$146 
$377 
$532 
$100 

46 
319 
2,488 

3 

9 
225 

6.0 
9.5 

94  0 
90.5 

Members  number 

Average  membership  per  church,- 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

8.8 
8.4 
21  0 

91.2 
91  6 
79  0 

Female                _    ._ 

Sex  not  reported 

Males  per  100  females  __ 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years   _  

13  years  and  over 

7.8 
18.2 

92  2 

81.8 

Age  not  reported  .         __       .  .       

Percent  under  13  years  2  

Church,  edifices,  number  

6.3 
6.4 
25.8 
26.3 
16.2 

93.7 
93  6 

74.2 
73.7 
83.8 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  ,         _,     _„  ... 

Constructed  prior  to  1936 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936_ 
Average  value  per  church  _ 

Debt—number  reporting 

Amount  reported  __         ._.      . 

55.3 
5.0 

44  7 
95  0 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

Parsonages,  number  

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported..,  „       

59.4 

8  1 
28  5 
43.9 
33.6 
9  9 

10.4 

45  6 
37.2 
32.4 

59.7 
41.1 

40.6 

91.9 
71.5 
56  1 
66  4 
90  1 

89.6 

54.4 
62.8 
67.6 
40.3 
58.9 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Amount  reported  _. 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries   . 

Repairs  and  improvements  _    . 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  inter- 
est   

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest __.  _.  . 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.... 
Home  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.. 
All  other  purposes  

Average  expenditure  per  church  

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Officers  and  teachers  

20.6 
25.9 

79  4 
74.1 

Scholars  

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number.  

Officers  and  teachers  

Scholars  

30  1 

69.9 

i  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

194 


TiEOlTLAU   BAPTISTS 


195 


Comparative  data,  1916-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  compari- 
son, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Regular  Baptists  for  the  census 
years  1936,  1926,  and  1916. 

TABLE  2. — COMPAKATIVE  SUMMARY,  1916  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

266 

349 

401 

Increase  *  over  preceding  census: 
Number  __ 

-83 

-52 

Percent 

—23.8 

—  13.0 

Members,  number 

17,  186 

23  091 

21,  521 

Increase  *  over  preceding  census: 
Number  _      _  _    

-5,905 

1,570 

Percent  .       _           _  __  . 

-25.6 

7.3 

Average  membership  per  church- 

65 

66 

54 

Church  edifices,  number 

189 

235 

192 

Value  —  number  reporting 

173 

233 

189 

Amount  reported  

$234,  595 

$647,  550 

$141,  480 

Average  value  per  church  _  _,    _    

$1,  356 

$2,  779 

$749 

Debt  —  number  reporting  _..           _.__         

16 

22 

15 

Amount  reported    _                 

$3,  318 

$106,  619 

$1,  462 

Parsonages,  number   _          .    __            

6 

Value  —  number  reporting 

3 

8 

o 

Amount  reported 

$10,  100 

$36,  325 

$3,  100 

Expenditures  : 

nhurfihfis  rapnrtfng,  nmribfir 

186 

223 

143 

Amount  reported 

$24,  023 

$55,  610 

$11,855 

Pastors'  salaries 

$5.  709 

All  other  salaries 

$1,  263 

Repairs  and  improvements.  

$4,  584 

I          $46,  168 

$10,  231 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  

$6,  330 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  

$3,  315 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc  

$768 

Home  missions 

$216 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$935 

>            $8,  815 

All  other  purposes 

$903 

Not  classified 

$627 

Average  expenditure  per  church..  

$129 

$249 

$83 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

54 

65 

50 

Officers  and  teachers 

402 

450 

264 

Scholars  _  

3,358 

4,690 

2,587 

*  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 

State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Regular  Bap- 
tists by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  membership 
of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory, 
membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives  for 
selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  three  census 
years  1916  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13 
years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  churches 
and  parsonages  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices  for  1936.  Table  6  pre- 
sents, for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  im- 
provements, benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statis- 
tics of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  table  5  is  limited  to  those 
States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  the  value  of  edifices. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  of  the  Regular 
Baptists,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States  in  the  pre- 
ceding tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and  debt  on 
church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 


275318 — 11 1-1 


196 


CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  8. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 

2 

IL 

£ 

1 

AND  STATE 

-M'rf 

O  CD 

J&0 

S 

® 

O  9 

^"cS 

S 

w  2 

52 

3 

£ 

Is 

s 

a 

o 

*H 

•3 
S 

"3 

1 

*t 

'S.S 

Jl 

ll 

1 

EH 

P 

&H 

P 

« 

Isi 

fe 

M 

^ 

0 

O 

03 

United  States  

266 

16 

250 

17,  186 

1,629 

15,  557 

5,952 

9,912 

1,322 

60.0 

54 

402 

3,358 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

6 

2 

4 

276 

131 

145 

109 

167 

65  3 

4 

28 

281 

Indiana     --.-- 

10 

1 

9 

819 

73 

746 

190 

267 

362 

71  2 

6 

51 

231 

Illinois 

1 

1 

44 

44 

17 

27 

1 

IS 

.      45 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Virginia 

38 

2 

36 

1,723 

79 

1,644 

612 

1,050 

61 

58.3 

6 

27 

248 

West  Virginia 

39 

46 

2 

1 

37 

45 

2,431 
3,620 

559 

82 

1,872 
3,538 

883 

1,188 

1,462 
2,049 

86 
383 

60.4 
58.0 

5 
20 

55 
137 

600 
1,048 

North  Carolina  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL 

Kentucky 

117 

6 

m 

7,666 

553 

7,113 

2,732 

4,504 

430 

60.7 

10 

79 

805 

Tennessee 

1 

1 

12 

12 

2 

10 

Alabama 

5 

1 

4 

514 

140 

374 

193 

321 

60.1 

2 

12 

100 

PACIFIC- 

Washington 

3 

3 

81 

81 

26 

55 

1  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

TABLE  4. — NUMBEE  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OP  CHUBCHES,  1916  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1036 

1936 

1936 

3916 

1936 

1926 

1916 

Un- 
der 
13 
years 

13 
years 
and 
over 

Age 
not  re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
13i 

United  States 

266 

349 

401 

17,  186 

23,  091 

21,  521 

59 

14,  691 

141 
218 
43 

2,436 

0.4 

.7 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL 
Ohio 

6 
10 
1 

6 
17 
1 

1 
19 
1 

4 

276 
819 

44 

1,456 
1,163 
81 

14 
1,214 
75 

115 
68 

3,094 
1,763 
3,714 

8,609 
2,582 
129 
93 

44 

7 

1 

134 
601 

Indiana.      -          -      -    

Illinois 

1 

2,3 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri    — 

Kansas   __-_    

1 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

38 
39 
46 

117 
1 
5 

56 
36 
57 

146 
17 
11 

64 
42 
59 

160 
43 
3 
2 

1,723 
2,431 
3,620 

7,666 
12 
514 

3,387 
2,191 
4,262 

8,745 
1,120 
556 

1,596 
2,202 
3,274 

6,751 
12 
373 

127 
181 
338 

915 

West  Virginia 

48 
8 

2.1 
.2 

North  Carolina 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky    _ 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

1 

140 

.3 

Mississippi 

PACIFIC: 
Washington  

3 

2 

1 
1 

81 

130 

81 

Idaho  

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


REGTJLAE   BAPTISTS 


197 


TABLE  5* — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  OP  CHURCH 
DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGBAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHUBCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States     .. 

266 

189 

173 

$234,  595 

16 

S3,  318 

3 

S10,  100 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 

Ohio  

6 
10 

38 
39 
46 

117 
10 

5 
6 

30 
18 
40 

82 
8 

5 

5 

29 

14 
40 

74 
«6 

5,925 
7,900 

44,000 
41,  825 
52,  410 

78,085 
4,450 

1 

1,275 

Indiana  

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

2 
1 
3 

9 

147 
250 
160 

1,486 

1 
1 

0) 
0) 

West  Virginia  

North  Carolina  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTBAL: 
Kentucky 

1 

0) 
10,  100 

Other  States 

*  Amount  included  in  figures  for  "Other  States/'  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual 
church. 
2  Includes:  Illinois,  1;  Tennessee,  1;  Alabama,  2;  and  Washington,  2 

TABLE  0. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 


I 

'S 

E 

SPENDI1 

'TJRES 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total  number  of  chu 

Churches  reporting 

Total  amount 

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  and  im- 
provements 

Payment  on  church 
debt,  excluding 
interest 

$a 

*»  s 

£j  § 

gg~! 
Ill 

o 

3£ 

*1 

1 
S 

Home  missions 

T=l 
g 
J3  w 

*§! 

<D  « 
§   O* 

S 

All  other  purposes 

United  States  

266 

188 

824,  023 

$5,  709 

$1,  263 

84,  584 

$6,330 

83,315 

$768 

S216 

£935 

S903 

EAST  NOETH  CENTBAL- 
Ohio 

6 

3 

667 

180 

52 

25 

240 

130 

40 

Indiana  

10 

9 

Aft 

Ofift 

5 

in 

Illinois  

1 

1 

— 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

38 

26 

2.567 

830 

26 

1,054 

125 

171 

103 

25 

122 

Ill 

West  Virginia 

39 

23 

4  811 

2  138 

348 

206 

1,229 

20 

41 

433 

396 

North  Carolina 

46 

30 

2  712 

603 

444 

663 

582 

160 

15 

19 

226 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTEAL: 
Kentucky.  -       

117 

8fi 

10,  973 

319 

343 

2,278 

5,965 

1,190 

408 

105 

202 

Iflf? 

Tennessee  

1 

1 

}2  Q9(% 

513 

10 

98 

32 

20 

148 

4 

Alabama              

5 

4 

PACIFIC. 

3 

3 

22 

13 

6 

3 

1  Amount  for  Illinois  combined  with  figures  for  Indiana,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual 
church. 

2  Amount  for  Tennessee  combined  with  figures  for  Alabama,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  in- 
dividual church. 


198 


CENSUS    OF   RELIGIOUS  BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHUBCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

S 
JS 

1 

c? 

1 
fc 

VALUE  OF 
CHTJKCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 

CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDI- 
TURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Scholars 

Total  

286 

ir,  186 

173 

$234,  595 

16 

$3,  318 

186 

$24,  023 

54 

3,358 

Alabama: 
Mount  Pleasant 

5 

1 

6 

4 

20 
1 
16 
13 

26 
10 
25 
6 

3 

15 
4 
13 

8 
2 
1 

6 

1 

5 

7 
2 
5 

17 
1 
1 

3 

17 
7 
4 
5 
5 
1 

514 

44 

639 
180 

1,700 
129 
814 
1,009 

1,671 
407 
1,371 
565 

284 
1,387 
170 
978 

581 
180 
40 

276 
12 

191 
269 
242 
340 

620 
43 
18 

81 

804 
563 
173 

118 
269 
504 

2 
1 

3 
2 

18 

(l) 
0) 
7,000 

0) 

18,  350 

4 
1 

6 
3 

14 

605 
(J) 

915 
253 

1,146 

2 

1 

4 
2 

7 

100 
45 

161 
70 

610 

Illinois: 
Mount  Tabor 

Indiana: 
Mount  Tabor             -  -  

Mount  Pleasant-Kichland  . 

Kentucky 
E  nterprise 

1 

150 

Green  River 

Indian  Bottom 

11 
4 

15 
5 
15 
6 

2 

12 
4 
12 

8 
2 

15,  600 
1,800 

11,  700 
7,700 
19,  400 
3,535 

0) 
9,800 
10,  010 
22,  700 

6,800 

(0 

1 

560 

12 
8 

19 
7 
20 
6 

2 
9 
2 
8 

6 
2 

1 

3 

1 

4 
5 
1 
2 

13 

1,334 
227 

891 
898 
5,890 

587 

0) 
649 
0) 
398 

312 
(>) 
0) 

667 
0) 

75 
1,353 
0) 
(') 

1,001 

^Mountain 

New  Salem 

2 
2 
3 

171 
170 
435 

Sardis 

Union 

Unassociated 

3 

2 
5 
2 
5 

4 

1 
1 

4 

195 

100 
209 
95 
300 

194 
70 
80 

281 

North  Carolina- 
Blue  Eidge     

Little  River     

1 
1 

1 

10 
50 
100 

Mitchell's  River   _-    „  

Mountain  Union    .    „.    _ 

"Regular  Primitive  , 

Union  

TJnassociated  _  _ 

Ohio: 
Enterprise 

5 
1 

5,925 
0) 

1 

1,275 

Tennessee: 

Eastern  _  

Virginia: 
Friendship  

Ketocton 

6 

2 

4 

15 
1 
1 

2 

1 
5 
2 
1 
4 
1 

17,  600 
0) 
14,300 

8,800 
0) 
(0 

(0 

P) 
,3«, 

0) 

2,625 

(0 

45,650 

4 
1 
1 

135 
20 
93 

Little  River  

Mountain  Union  

Union 

2 

147 

New  Salem  

Indian  Bottom  

1 
3 

10 
7 
2 
1 
2 
1 

(0 

22 

101 
999 
0) 
0 
0) 
0) 

5,700 

Washington: 
IXTew  S^lfim      . 

West  Virginia: 
Friendship  

Indian  Creek   __  „ 

1 

250 

3 

210 

Kyova.—  

Mount  Zion  

1 

50 

Sardis  _  _  

Broad  Run_,_  _  

1 

340 

Combinations  

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statis- 
tics of  any  individual]church. 


REGULAR   BAPTISTS  199 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

Under  this  head  are  included  a  number  of  associations  of  Baptists  who  claim 
to  represent  the  original  English  Baptists  before  the  distinction  between  Cal- 
vinistic  or  Particular  and  Arminian  or  General  became  prominent.  They  are 
thus  distinguished  from  the  Primitive  Baptists,  representing  the  extreme  of 
Calvinism,  and  the  General,  Free  Will,  and  other  Baptists,  inclining  more  to  the 
Arminian  doctrine;  but  are  in  general  sympathy  with  the  United  Baptists  and 
Duck  River  and  Kindred  Associations  of  Baptists.  Some  use  the  term  "Regular" 
alone,  and  some  the  term  "Regular  Primitive,"  but  so  far  as  reported  all  are 
included  under  the  one  head  of  "Regular."  They  are  to  be  found  chiefly  in 
North  Carolina,  Virginia,  West  Virginia,  Kentucky,  and  the  adjoining  States. 
The  question  has  arisen  as  to  the  consolidation  of  these  three  groups,  but  as  yet 
no  definite  action  has  been  taken.2 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

In  doctrine  the  Regular  Baptists  are  essentially  at  one  with  the  United  Baptists 
and  hold  that  God  gives  no  command  but  what  he  holds  all  men  responsible  for 
complying  therewith,  compliance  always  being  by  enabling  grace;  and  by  such 
enabling  grace  man  may  comply  with  the  conditions  necessary  to  salvation;  that 
man  as  a  result  of  sin  is  completely  depraved,  having  neither  will  nor  power  to 
extricate  himself  from  his  state  of  death  in  sin  and  his  salvation  is  purely  or 
entirely  by  grace  as  a  result  of  God's  mercy  and  love;  since  Christ  was  offered  an 
infinite  sacrifice  for  sin,  on  the  basis  of  this  sacrifice  the  gospel  of  God's  grace  is 
to  be  preached  to  all  men,  the  lost  being  lost  because  of  their  unbelief. 

The  different  confessions  of  faith  adopted  by  other  Baptists,  such  as  the  London 
Confession,  the  Philadelphia  Confession,  and  the  New  Hampshire  Confession  are 
not  in  use.  Each  association  has  its  own  confession  and  there  will  be  found  in 
numerous  cases  some  slight  difference,  particularly  in  the  case  of  the  Ketocton 
and  Indian  Creek  Associations,  including  churches  in  northern  Virginia  and  West 
Virginia,  and  Big  Harpeth  Church  in  Tennessee,  where  the  doctrine  is  found  to 
be  rather  more  Calvinistic,  and  more  nearly  in  harmony  with  that  of  the  Primitive 
Baptist  group.  There  is,  however,  such  general  correspondence  as  to  permit  the 
classification  of  these  associations  together.  They  are  strict  in  admission  to  the 
Lord's  Supper,  practicing  close  communion,  and  for  the  most  part  observing  the 
ceremony  of  feet  washing. 

In  polity  the  Regular  Baptists  are  distinctly  congregational.  The  churches 
meet  for  fellowship  in  associations  and  frequently  send  messengers  to  other 
associations,  but  there  is  no  organic  union  between  the  different  associations  and 
the  lists  of  churches  not  infrequently  vary  from  year  to  year. 


1  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  tiuat  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  E.  A.  Williams,  of  the  Regular  Baptists,  Whitestown,  Ind.,  and  approved 
by  him  in  its  present  form. 

2  Use  of  the  term  "Regular"  has  varied  at  different  times.    In  the  report  of  churches  for  1890  it  was  ap- 
plied to  the  great  body  of  Baptists  included  in  the  Northern,  Southern,  and  National  Conventions.    That 
use,  however,  has  dropped  out  and  at  present  the  term  seems  to  be  limited  to  the  churches  described  above. 
But  some  organizations  of  Baptists  in  Tennessee  and  adjoining  States,  listed  under  the  head  of  Duck  River 
and  Kindred  Associations  of  Baptists,  are  in  fact  the  same  kind  of  Baptists  as  the  Regular  Baptists  and 
might  properly  have  been  included  as  a  part  of  this  group. 


UNITED 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification, — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  United  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is  presented 
in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between  urban  and 
rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have  been 
received  into  the  local  churches  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by  im- 
mersion. 

TABLE   1. — STTMMABY  or  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES   IN  URBAN   AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  * 

Urban 

Rural 

Clmrclies  (local  organizations)  ,  number 

277 

27,  000 
97 

9,419 
14,  868 
2,713 
63.4 

203 
23,  688 
3,209 
0.9 

168 
161 
$179,  215 
$171,  975 
$7,  240 
$1,  113 
8 
$4,  173 
111 

4 
1 
$500 

188 
$15,448 
$4,  174 
$588 
$3,  737 

$1,  657 

$1,  589 
$802 
$603 
$426 
$194 
$1,  678 
$82 

10 

864 
86 

313 
533 
18 

58.7 

267 

26,  136 
98 

9,106 
14,  335 
"  2,  695 
63  5 

203 
22,  887 
3,046 
0.9 

163 
156 

$167,  415 
$160,  175 
$7,  240 
$1,  073 
7 
$1,  526 
109 

4 
1 
$500 

181 
$14,  443 
$3,  826 
$543 

$3,554 

$1,  542 

$1,  380 
$802 
$588 
$401 
$194 
$1,  613 
$80 

3.6 
3.2 

96.4 
96.8 

MerofofTF,  niiTnh*?!* 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male  -  -  

3.3 
3.6 

.7 

96.7 
96.4 
99.3 

Female-      -  _ 

Sex  not  reported 

Male1?  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

100.0 
97.0 
94.9 

13  years  and  over  

701 
163 

3.0 

5.1 

Age  not  reported    ._      -  _      

Percent  under  13  years  3 

Ohitrclt  edifices,  fniTttber 

5 
5 
$11,  800 
$11,800 

3.0 
3.1 
6  6 
6.9 

97.0 
96.9 
93.4 
93.1 
100.0 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported  —  

Constructed  prior  to  1936    

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936_ 
Average  value  per  church 

$2,  360 
1 
$2,  647 
2 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

63.4 
1.8 

36.6 
98  2 

Number  reporting  "no  debt".  .  _.  

Parsonages,  number  _.  

Value  —  number  reporting  _».__    __       

Amount  reported 

100.0 

96.3 
93.5 
91.7 
92.3 
95.1 

93.1 

86.8 
100.0 
97.5 
94.1 
100.0 
96.1 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

7 
$1,005 
$348 
$45 
$183 

$115 
$209 

3.7 
8  5 
8.3 
7.7 
4.9 

6.9 
13.2 

Amount  reported 

Pastors*  salaries  ..  

All  other  salaries      ,    ._ 

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest    

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest _                 ~ 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc  
Home  missions  

$15 
$25 

2.5 
5.9 

Foreign  missions  

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  
All  other  purposes 

$65 
$144 

3.9 

Average  exoen  diture  Der'church  

'  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

2  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

200 


UNITED   BAPTISTS' 


201 


TABLE   1.- — SUMMARY    OF   STATISTICS   FOR   CHURCHES   IN   URBAN   AND    RURAL 
TBREITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEBCENT  OF 
TOTM,  l 

Urban 

Rural 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  . 

73 
589 
4,929 

5 
47 

294 

4 
15 
158 

1 
13 

67 

4 
34 
303 

69 
555 
4,626 

5 
47 
294 

3 

10 
133 

1 
13 

67 

Officers  and  teachers  - 

5.8 
6.1 

94.2 
93.9 

Scholars  

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers    _.    

Scholars  

100.0 

Weekday  religious  schools: 
Churches  reporting,  number  . 

1 
5 
25 

Officers  and  teachers  

Scholars  .  _      

15.8 

84.2 

Parochial  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  ______ 

Officers  and  teachers..       _    __, 

Scholars..                           

*  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  compari- 
son, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  United  Baptists  for  the  census 
years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

19O6 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

277 

221 

254 

190 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census; 
Number                           „            ._.  

56 

-33 

64 

Percent                                          

25.3 

—13.0 

33.7 

Members,  number  _  __    __      

27,  000 

18,  903 

22,  097 

13,  698 

Increase  {  over  preceding  census. 
Number                          _             

8,097 

-3,  194 

8,399 

Percent                          _           _      

42  8 

—14.5 

61.3 

Average  insrnberstiip  psr  church 

97 

86 

87 

72 

Church  edifices,  number            

168 

142 

82 

77 

Vain  A  —  nnrnber  rftpArtirif 

161 

139 

82 

75 

Amount  reported                           

$179,  215 

$144,  665 

$52,  147 

$36,  715 

Average  value  per  church              _  

$1,  113 

$1,  041 

$636 

$490 

Debt  —  number  reporting                        

8 

10 

o 

2 

Amount  reported         

$4,  173 

$1,  610 

$20 

$115 

Parsonages,  number 

4 

Value—number  reporting 

1 

Amount  reported 

$500 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

188 

147 

69 

Amount  reported 

$15,  448 

$15,  094 

$4,837 

Pastors'  salaries 

$4,174 

All  other  salaries 

$588 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$3,737 

I      $11,  103 

$3,647 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest-— 
Local  relief  and  charity  Red  Cross,  etc 

$1,  657 
$1,  589 
$802 

TTome  rnissfoTis 

$603 

Foreign  missions 

$426 

I       $1,  862 

$1,  190 

To  goneral  headquarters  for  distribution 

$194 

All  other  purposes 

$1,  678 

Not  classified 

$2,129 

\verase  expenditure  per  church 

$82 

$103 

$70 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting    number               -  -  —  

73 

39 

16 

21 

Officers  and  teachers.    «.    

589 

239 

92 

168 

Scholars  

4,929 

2,005 

701 

1,360 

*  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


202 


CENSUS 


RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    10,'JG 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  United  Baptists 
by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  membership 
of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory, 
membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives  the 
number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936, 
together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and 
"13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  church  edifices  and  the 
amount  of  debt  on  such  property  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church 
expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences, 
etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics  of  any  individual  church, 
separate  presentation  in  table  6  is  limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or  more 
churches  reported  expenditures. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions, — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  of  the  United 
Baptists,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States  in  the 
preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and  debt  on 
church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 

<b 

n 

w  be 

o  p 

«« 

AND  STATE 

n-j 

P<«2« 

C3  ° 

"3 

§ 

"3 

•a 

a 

f, 

0 

£ 

03 

l§ 

^S^ 

M  0 

|| 

1 

n 

•2 

3 

3 

<D  ^ 

M1^  ^ 

&  1-i 

ti-w 

B 

0 

£ 

fc 

CQ 

A 

0 

O 

CO 

United  States  

277 

10 

267 

27,  000 

864 

26,  136 

9,419 

14,  868 

2,713 

63.4 

73 

589 

4,929 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

^~"~ 

•Ohio 

11 

11 

891 

891 

376 

515 

73.0 

5 

41 

205 

Wisconsin 

9 

45 

45 

20 

25 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL- 

Missouri 

14 

i 

13 

1,225 

43 

1,182 

397 

627 

201 

63.3 

4 

a? 

157 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Virginia 

0 

0 

95 

95 

53 

42 

West  Virginia 

5 

5,299 

35Q 

4,940 

1,858 

3,148 

293 

59.0 

13 

107 

1,233 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL- 

Kentucky 

134 

4fi 

4 

130 

14,  759 
4,651 

462 

14,297 
4,651 

5,176 
1,539 

7,896 
2,615 

1,687 
497 

65.6 
58.9 

23 
2R 

205 
204 

1,755 
1,579 

Tennessee  

PACIFIC: 

Washington 

1 

1 

35 



35 

35 

1  Eatio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


UNITED    BAPTISTS 


203 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER   OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1S36 

1936 

277 

1926 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Un- 
der 
13 
years 

13 
years 
and 
over 

Age 
not 
re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
131 

United  States 

221 

254 

190 

27,  000 

18,  903 

22,  097 

13.  698 

203 

23,  588 

3,209 

0.9 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

Ohio  

11 
?, 

12 

1 

17 

891 
45 

1,225 

663 

73 

1,381 

5 

513 

45 

1,082 

373 

1.0 

Wisconsin           

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri 

14 

21 

21 

28 
1 

1,581 

1,334 

1,267 
11 

143 

Nebraska  

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia,-  _  

9, 

95 
5,299 

14,  759 
4,651 

95 
4,071 

13,  476 
4,271 

West  Virginia 

67 

134 
46 

48 

119 
IS 

40 
192 

32 
79 

3,744 

11,  557 
1,302 

3,565 
17,  125 

2,226 
7,167 

111 

47 
40 

1,117 

1,236 
340 

2.7 

.3 

.9 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  

Tennessee  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

33 

1,646 

PACIFIC: 
Washington  _     

1 

3 

35 

56 

35 

1  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 
TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH  DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION*AND 

STATE 

Total 
number  of 
churches 

Number  of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

277 

168 

161 

10 

$179,  215 
9,200 

8 

$4,  173 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

11 
2 

14 

2 
67 

134 
46 

1 

10 

2 

500 

Wisconsin 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri 

12 

1 
32 

79 
34 

12 

1 
30 

75 
33 

9,750 
}     i  53,410 

87,490 
19,  365 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

1 
5 

2,647 
1,026 

West  Virginia    

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky       

Tennessee 

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

i Amount  for  Virginia  combined  with  figures  for  West  Virginia,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any 
individual  church. 


204  CENSUS'    OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Repairs 
and  im- 
provements 

United  States  

277 

188 

7 
12 
47 

88 
31 

13 

$15,  448 

84,  174 
271 
615 

874 

1,696 
718 

$588 
24 

$3,  737 

.',  :.!„,"-""  ::,:  

161 
152 

877 

1,815 
707 

25 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

11 
14 
67 

134 
46 

5 

676 
938 
3,853 

6,982 
2,967 

32 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri  _ 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
West  Virginia      _.  

165 

261 
138 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL* 
Kentucky  _.  

Tennessee 

Other  States 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

EXPENDITURES—  continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local 
relief  and 
charity 

Home 
mission1' 

Foreign 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral head 
quarters 

All  other 
purposes 

United  States 

$1,  657 

SI,  589 
94 
60 
381 

796 
253 

5 

$802 

$803 

S426 

$194 

$1,  678 

E\ST  NORTH  CENTRAL. 
Ohio         

82 
30 
1,260 

245 
40 

4 
4 
30 

128 
28 

40 
23 

144 

662 
807 

2 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL* 
Missouri 

20 
117 

644 
121 

34 
5 

419 
145 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
West  Virginia 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  

416 
10 

Tennessee     --         -- 

Other  States               

*  Includes-  Wisconsin,  1,  and  Virginia,  2. 


UNITED    BAPTISTS 


205 


TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHUKCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 

CHUKCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITUEES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

J 

Churches  re- 
porting 

a 

o 

a 

<! 

Churches  re- 
porting 

d 
& 
o 
S 
•< 

Churches  re- 
porting 

o 

1 

Total 

277 

27,  000 

1,109 
2,937 
1,329 
967 
576 

116 
1,461 
239 
944 
162 

14 
1,150 
256 
1,609 
278 

589 
50 
3,868 
387 
88 

1,610 
100 
4,294 
2,867 

161 

$179,  215 

8 

$4,  173 

188 

815,448 

78 

4,929 

Bethel  

11 
34 
15 
9 
6 

3 
8 
3 
14 
2 

1 
12 
4 
19 

4 

8 
2 

28 
3 
1 

16 
2 
38 
34 

9 
39 

7 
9 
5 

3 

7 
1 
6 
1 

8,250 
40,  960 
3,550 
3,965 
4,500 

1,500 
14,  000 
C1) 
3,800 

10 
27 
9 
7 
5 

2 

8 
1 
9 

1 

919 
2,951 
276 
100 
514 

0) 
1,753 

C1) 

3 

8 

137 
856 

Bethlehem  No.  1      __      __  _ 

1 

2,647 

Bethlehem  No.  2    __ 

Blaine  Union 

Center  Point 

6 

1 
6 

253 

20 
425 

Central  Missouri 

Cumberland  River 

Iron  Hill  No.  1  

Iron  Hill  No.  2  

2 

650 

Laurel  River  

Little  River  

Mountain  Association 

2 

4 
6 
4 

2 

0) 

5,700 
3,650 
2,700 

C1) 

9 

2 
11 
3 

5 

S97 

580 
895 

179 

7 
4 
2 
1 

2 

750 
404 
46 
30 

90 

Mount  Zion 

New  Liberty 

New  Zion 

Olive 

Paint  River 

21 

1 

1 

13 

21,300 
0) 
(*) 

8,865 

5 

876 

19 

2 

971 
0) 

South  Concord 

South  Fork 

1 

7 

35 
315 

Stockton  Valley 

14 
2 
23 
19 

1,093 

2,090 
511 

969 

Unassociated 

'Western  Union 

25 

15 

12,  750 
35,  725 

8,000 

25 

1,568 

Zion 

n  oin  b  i  n  flLti^Ti  s 

i  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations/'  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of 
any  individual  church. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

With  the  immigration  of  Baptists  from  the  New  England  and  Middle  States 
into  Virginia,  the  Carolinas,  Tennessee,  and  Kentucky,  and  the  more  intimate 
fellowship  that  grew  up  in  those  isolated  communities,  the  distinction  between  the 
different  Baptist  bodies,  Calvinistic  or  Particular,  and  Arminian  or  General, 
became  in  many  cases  less  marked,  and  a  tendency  toward  union  was  apparent. 
In  Virginia  and  the  Carolinas,  particularly,  and  also  in  Kentucky,  during  the 
latter  part  of  the  eighteenth  and  early  part  of  the  nineteenth  centuries,  a  con- 
siderable number  of  the  Separate  Baptists  and  those  who  were  known  as  "Regu- 
lar Baptists, })  claiming  to  represent  the  original  English  Baptists  before  the  dis- 
tinction between  Particular  and  General  became  prominent,  combined  under  the 
name  of  "United  Baptists."  The  Separate  Baptists  emphasized  less  strongly 
the  Arminian  characteristics  of  their  belief,  while  the  Regular  Baptists  were 
more  ready  to  allow  special  customs,  particularly  foot  washing,  wherever  they 
were  desired.  This  movement,  which  took  definite  form  in  Richmond,  Va.,  in 
1794  and  in  Kentucky  in  1804,  for  a  time  gained  strength  and  the  associations 
kept  their  identity;  but  gradually,  as  they  came  into  closer  relations  with  the 
larger  Baptist  bodies  of  the  North  and  South,  many  United  Baptist  churches 
ceased  to  be  distinct  and  became  enrolled  with  other  Baptist  bodies. 

iThis  statement,  which  is  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious  Bodies,  1926, 
has  been  approved  in  its  present  form  by  Elder  Aaron  Stepp,  moderator  of  the  Zion  Association,  UnHed 
Baptists,  Inez,  Ky. 


206  CENSUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

Of  late  years  there  has  developed  considerable  fellowship  with  associations  still 
using  the  name  "Regular/'  and  with  those  listed  in  the  census  report  as  the 
"Duck  River  and  Kindred  Associations  of  Baptists,"  and  there  has  been  talk  of 
a  consolidation  of  these  different  associations.  As  yet  no  definite  steps  to  this 
end  have  been  taken. 

The  name  " United  Baptist'7  still  appears  on  the  minutes  of  many  associations 
whose  churches  are  enrolled  with  the  Baptists  of  the  Northern  Convention  or 
the  Southern  Convention,  chiefly  with  the  latter,  but  there  are  some  which  retain 
their  distinctive  position.  In  many  cases,  even  where  they  are  not  on  the  rolls 
of  the  Southern  Baptist  Convention,  they  are  still  in  intimate  relations  with  its 
churches,  attend  the  same  meetings,  and  are  identified  with  them  in  many  ways. 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

In  doctrine  the  United  Baptists  hold  that  salvation  is  all  of  grace  and  in  no 
sense  of  works;  yet  that  it  is  conditional  upon  performance  of  the  requirements 
of  the  Gospel  which,  they  claim,  is  to  be  preached  to  all  men;  and,  as  all  men 
are  commanded  to  repent,  it  necessarily  follows  that  all  men  are  given  ability 
to  repent,  being  led  to  repentance  by  the  goodness  of  God,  or,  on  the  other  hand, 
being  led  to  rebellion  and  resistance  by  the  devices  of  Satan;  but  that,  in  either 
case,  it  is  as  the  individual  inclines  the  ear  and  heart,  or  yields  himself  to  obey. 
They  observe  the  ceremony  of  foot  washing,  and  are  strict  in  their  practice  of 
close  communion.  In  polity  they  are  strictly  congregational. 


DUCK  RIVER  AND  KINDRED  ASSOCIATIONS  OF 
BAPTISTS  (BAPTIST  CHURCH  OF  CHRIST) 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Duck  River  and  Kindred  Associations  of  Baptists 
(Baptist  Church  of  Christ)  for  the  year  1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows 
also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between  urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  includes  those  who  have  been  enrolled 
in  the  local  churches  upon  regeneration  and  baptism.  Baptism  is  by  immersion. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY   OF   STATISTICS   FOB  CHURCHES   IN   URBAN  AND   EURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTALS 

Urban 

Ruril 

Clmrclies  (local  organizations),  number 

91 

7,951 
87 

2,843 
4,  347 
761 
65  4 

31 

7,377 
543 
0.4 

74 
68 
$49,  615 
$47,  115 
$2,  500 
$730 
1 
$1,000 
50 

58 
$5,  333 
$2.  389 
$372 
$1,  436 

$75 

$246 
$382 
$140 
$7 
$286 
$92 

20 

141 
992 

4 

402 
101 

159 
243 

87 

7,549 
87 

2,684 
4,104 
761 
65.4 

17 
6,989 
543 
0.2 

70 
65 
$46,  815 
$44,  315 
$2,  500 
$720 
1 
$1,000 

Members,  number  

5.1 

94  y 

Average  membership  per  church  

Membership  by  sex: 
Male  

5.6 
5  6 

94.4 

94.4 
100  0 

Female 

Sex  not  reported 

Males  per  100  females  .  . 

65.4 

14 
388 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years  

13  years  and  over  

5  3 

94  7 
100  0 

Age  not  reported  

Percent  tinder  13  years  2 

3.5 

4 
3 

$2,  800 
$2,  ROO 

Glmrcli  edifices,  number. 

Value  —  number  reporting  _  _ 

Amount  reported 

5,6 
5.9 

94  4 
94.1 
100.0 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church.. 

$933 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

100  0 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

2 

3 

$528 
$286 
$117 
$25 

48 

55 
$4,  805 
$2,  103 
$255 
$1,411 

$75 

$246 
$332 

$90 

$7 
$286 

m~ 

17 
111 
839 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Amount  reported 

9.9 
12.0 
31.5 
1.7 

90  1 
88.0 
68.5 
9S  3 

Pastors'  salaries  

All  other  salaries  

Repairs  and  improvements  

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  inter- 
est 

All   other   current    expenses,    including 
interest 

100.  0 
86.9 
64.3 

Local  relief  and  chanty,  Red  Cross,  etc... 
Horrie  missions  -  _-  

$50 
$50 

13  1 
35.7 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  .  , 
All  other  purposes 

100.0 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$176 

3 
30 
153 

Sunday  schools: 
Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  teachers    _  .                

21.3 

15.4 

78.7 
84  6 

Scholars-                     

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100, 

2  Based  on  membership  with  ago  classification  reported. 


207 


208 


CENSUS'   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIEiS,    1936 


Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Duck  River  and  Kindred 
Associations  of  Baptists  for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPAKATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

Churclies  (local  organizations),  number                    

91 

98 

105 

92 

Increase  J  over  preceding  census. 
Number  ...             .       

-7 

-7 

13 

Percent  2                                                    j> 

-8.7 

Members,  number 

7,951 

7,340 

6,872 

6,416 

Increase  over  preceding  census. 
Number 

611 

468 

456 

Percent-.                      _  

8.3 

6  8 

7.1 

A.vpr^,£Q  •m<arn"bp'f<?hfp  pp.r  r»hprfih 

37 

75 

65 

70 

Church  edifices,  number  

74 

76 

51 

86 

Value  —  number  reporting 

68 

75 

49 

86 

Amount  reported  _  

$49,  615 

$51,  175 

$40,  600 

$44,  321 

Average  value  per  church  _       .  . 

$730 

$682 

$829 

$515 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

1 

2 

3 

Amount  reported 

$1,000 

$195 

$107 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

58 

46 

67 

Amount  reported..  __         .  . 

$5,  333 

$5,  362 

$2,  518 

Pastors*  salaries  . 

$2,  389 

All  other  salaries.  

$372 

Repairs  and  improvements     

$1,  436 

$3,  S45 

$1,  206 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  ... 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

$75 
$246 
$382 

"FTorno  rmssinns 

$140 

Foreign  missions,  

$867 

$1,  312 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$7 

Ail  other  purposes 

$286 

Not  classified 

$650 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$92 

$117 

$38 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number,  . 

20 

14 

8 

9 

Officers  and  teachers 

141 

78 

48 

37 

Scholars  ..  .  

992 

795 

399 

402 

i  A  minus  sign  f— )  denotes  decrease. 


*  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Duck  River 
and  Kindred  Associations  of  Baptists  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State 
for  1936  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their 
location  in  urban  or  rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for 
Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches 
for  the  four  census  years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936 
classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5 
shows  the  value  of  church  edifices  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  such  property  for 
1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately 
current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  of  the  Duck 
River  Baptists,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States  in 
the  preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  and  debt 
on  church  edifices,  expenditures,  and  Sunday  schools. 


DUCK    RIVE®   AND    KINDRED'   ASSOCIATIONS 


209 


TABLE  8. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NUMBER  OP 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OS1  MEM- 
BERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

GEOGRAPHIC      DIVISION 

S-i 

§ 

g 

PJ   03 

AND  STATE 

'o 

1-4     O 

gfl 

a> 

cs 

O  "£ 

ft   "" 

JlS 

S 

3 

o 

a 
,2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

•i 

fl  o 

'^"<~l 

§S 

s  a 

^^ 

"o 

-g 

P 

p 

PH 

§ 

fe 

CQ 

§ 

0 

O 

ra 

United  States 

91 

4 

W 

7,951 

402 

7  549 

2,843 

4,347 

761 

65  4 

20 

141 

992 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Georgia  

1 

1 

170 

170 

70 

100 

70.0 

1 

13 

25 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Tennessee 

52 

1 

51 

4,576 

12 

4  564 

1  587 

2  613 

376 

60.7 

15 

98 

689 

Alabama 

31 

9 

9Q 

2,844 

220 

2  624 

1  001 

1,458 

385 

68  7 

4 

30 

278 

Mississippi  _. 

7 

7 

361 

361 

185 

176 

105  1 

TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


STATE 

NUMBER  OP 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Un- 
der 
13 
years 

13 

years 
and 
over 

Age 
not 
re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 

13  i 

United  States  

91 

98 

105 

92 

7,951 

7,340 

6,872 

8,418 

31 

7,377 

543 

0  4 

Georgia 

1 
52 
31 
7 

1 
58 
31 
8 

170 
4,576 
2,844 
361 

29 

4,490 
2,453 
368 

6 
15 
9 
1 

164 
4,105 
2,748 
360 

3  5 
.4 
.?> 
.3 

Tennessee 

67 
33 
5 

56 
28 
8 

4,589 
2,034 
249 

4,099 
1,947 
370 

456 
87 

Alabama..  __  

Mississippi 

1  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 
TABLE  5. — VALUE  OP  CHUBCHES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH  DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 


Total 
number 

Number 

VALUE  01 
EDII 

7  CHURCH 
ICES 

DEBT  ON 
EDIF 

CHURCH 
ICES 

STATE 

of 
churches 

edifices 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

91 

74 

68 

$49,  615 

1 

$1,000 

Georgia 

1 

1 

Tennessee     .           _         

52 

40 

40 

32,  965 

Alabama 

31 

26 

23 

13,  950 

Mississippi  _  

7 

7 

5 

2,700 

1 

1,000 

210  CKJSttUS1   OK    R.KLIUIOUS    BODIEH,    ]{»:-;  6 

TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITUEES  BY  STATES,  1936 


1 

EXPENDITURES 

3 

o 

bfl 

fl 

"3  « 

o5  Q 

rt 

•2 

M 

STATE 

number  of 

dies  reportil 

1 

rs*  salaries 

1 

1 

urs  and  i 
movements 

aent  on  chui 
)t,  excludi 
erest 

TD 

4-3    3 

11 

3     ^^s 

c3 

If 

e  missions 

general  he 
quarters 

her  purpose 

cs 

S 

3 

In 

o 

ft 

&*"d 

Ja  ^"d 

a 

a 

o 

Q 

o 

% 

CD 

o 

o 

o 

O 

PL, 

<{ 

PH 

PH 

0 

w 

<! 

United  States  __. 

91 

58 

So,  333 

82,339 

$372 

81,436 

$75 

S21C 

S382 

$140 

$7 

S286 

Georgia  - 

1 

52 

]i37 

3,757 

2,287 

347 

756 



133 

60 

65 

4 

105 

Tennessee  __ 

Alabama  - 

31 

17 

1,349 

25 

25 

680 

75 

38 

302 

70 

3 

131 

]VI  ississipp  i 

7 

4 

227 

77 

75 

20 

5 



50 

1  Amount  for  Georgia  combined  with  figures  for  Tennessee,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  indi- 
vidual church. 

TABLE  7. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  VALUE  AND  DEBT  ON 
CHURCH  EDIFICES,  EXPENDITURES,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS, 
1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total  number  of 
churches 

Number  of  members 

VALUE  OF 
CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON 

CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

j  Churches  re- 
_  porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Amount 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Scholars 

-     Total  

91 

7,951 

68 

S49,  615 

81,000 

58 

$5,  333 

20 

992 

D  uck  River 

21 
6 
6 
7 

27 
10 
1 
10 

2,508 
261 
255 
420 

2,817 
826 
70 
794 

22 

1 
4 
6 

19 
9 
1 
6 

23,  140 
}  i  3,  500 
2,200 

12,  950 
}  24,275 
3,550 

18 

<S 

15 
8 
6 

2,326 
30 
292 
109 

1,651 
538 
387 

4 
1 

200 
49 

East  Union  

1 

1,000 

Ebenezer  _.         

Liberty 

Mount  Pleasant 

6 
/      5 

1  5 

368 
215 
20 
140 

Mount  Zion,__  

New  Liberty  _  

Union 

i  Amount  for  East  Union  Association  combined  with  figures  for  Ebenezer  Association,  to  avoid  disclosing 
the  statistics  of  any  individual  church. 

*  Amount  for  Mount  Zion  Association  combined  with  figures  for  New  Liberty  Association,  to  avoid  dis- 
closing the  statistics  01  any  individual  church. 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  ' 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

Baptist  principles  quite  early  gained  a  strong  foothold  in  the  mountainous 
sections  of  Tennessee,  many  of  the  early  settlers  being  Baptists  from  the  older 
States,  led  by  Elder  George  Foster  from  Kentucky,  and  others.  Five  churches 
were  organized  in  1807,  and  these  came  together  in  1808  and  organized  the  Elk 
River  Association,  one  of  the  oldest  associations  in  middle  Tennessee. 

This  association  was  strongly  Calvinistic  in  doctrine.  There  grew  up  an  ele- 
ment within  it,  however,  which  was  more  liberal  in  its  belief  in  the  atonement  and 
the  plan  of  salvation.  As  this  element  increased,  the  opposite  party  became  even 
stricter  in  its  theology  and  practice.  These  differences  became  so  great  that  in 

1  This  statement,  which  is  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious  Bodies,  1926,  has 
been  approved  in  its  present  form  by  S  F.  Shelton,  clerk,  Duck  River  and  Kindred  Associations  of  Baptists, 
Christiana,  Tenn. 


DUCK    RIVER    AND    KINDRED1   ASSOCIATIONS  211 

1825  the  liberal  minority  withdrew  from  the  association  and  organized  the  Duck 
River  Association.  On  account  of  this  division,  they  were  for  a,  time  called  the 
"Separate  Baptists,"  although  they  did  not  actually  identify  themselves  with  that 
body.  With  the  increase  in  churches,  other  associations  have  been  organized, 
principally  in  Tennessee  and  Alabama,  which  have  regular  affiliation  with  each 
other. 

Later  discussion  arose  as  to  the  legitimacy  of  missionary  operations  as  then 
conducted,  missionary  contributions  being  compulsory  on  the  part  of  the  churches; 
there  came  another  division,  some  withdrawing  and  identifying  themselves  with 
the  churches  which  became  known  as  the  Missionary  Baptists,  but  leaving  the 
others  still  more  closely  bound  together. 

DOCTRINE 

In  doctrine,  the  Duck  River  and  its  kindred  associations  are  Calvinistic, 
though  liberal,  believing  that  "Christ  tasted  death  for  every  man"  and  made  it 
possible  for  God  to  have  mercy  upon  all  who  come  unto  Him  on  Gospel  terms. 
They  believe  that  sinners  are  justified  by  faith;  that  the  saints  will  "persevere 
in  grace,"  and  that  baptism  of  believers  by  immersion,  the  Lord's  Supper,  and  the 
washing  of  the  saints7  feet  are  Gospel  institutions  and  should  be  observed  until 
the  second  coming  of  Christ.  While  acknowledging  the  similarity  of  their  doctrinal 
position  to  that  of  the  Separate  Baptists,  they  have  not  as  yet  seen  their  way 
clear  to  form  a  union  with  them,  although  an  increasing  sentiment  appears  to 
exist  among  the  churches  in  favor  of  such  union.  Similar  discussion  has  arisen 
with  regard  to  the  United  and  Regular  Baptists,  but  no  action  has  been  taken. 

ORGANIZATION 

In  polity  they  are  in  accord  with  other  Baptists,  believing  that  no  one  member 
has  a  ruling  voice  over  another.  All  business  is  transacted  by  a  majority  vote, 
no  one  person  being  given  any  ecclesiastical  power  over  a  church  or  churches. 
Admission  to  the  church  is  by  examination  and  vote  of  the  church,  and  ordina- 
tion to  the  ministry  is  by  two  or  more  ordained  ministers,  the  candidate  being  ex- 
pected to  demonstrate  his  consciousness  of  a  divine  call  to  preach  the  gospel.  The 
minister  has  no  right  to  demand  a  sta'ted  salary s  but  the  local  church  is  expected 
to  give  liberally,  "that  they  which  preach  the  gospel  [may]  live  of  the  gospel." 

The  association  meetings  are  purely  for  purposes  of  fellowship,  and  communi- 
cation with  kindred  bodies  is  by  messenger  or  letter.  The  only  form  of  discipline 
is  withdrawal  of  fellowship,  on  evidence  of  difference  of  views  or  of  conduct 
unbecoming  a  member  of  the  church. 

WORK 

While  not  represented  by  any  distinctive  missionary  societies  or  benevolent 
organizations,  this  body  is  not  to  be  classed  with  antimissionary  churches.  Since 
it  occupies  mountainous  sections  chiefly  and  represents  the  less  wealthy  com- 
munities, the  missionary  spirit  finds  expression  in  local  evangelistic  work.  As 
it  comes  in  contact  more  and  more  with  other  churches  its  sense  of  fellowship  has 
broadened,  and  with  this  has  been  apparent  a  desire  to  share  in  the  wider  work  of 
the  general  church. 


275318—41 15 


PRIMITIVE  BAPTISTS 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  tlie  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Primitive  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is  pre- 
sented in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have 
been  enrolled  in  the  local  churches  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by 
immersion. 

TABLE  I. — SUMMARY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations)  ,  number 

1,726 

69,  157 
40 

23,490 
41,  795 
3,872 
56.2 

220 
60,  132 
8,  805 
0.4 

1,426 
1,365 
$2,  180,  047 
$2,116,855 
§63,  192 
$1,  597 
47 
$13,  649 
1,011 

20 
14 
$31,800 

1,054 
$157,  530 
$69,  517 
$5,  319 
$38,000 

$9,  382 

$18,  971 
$6,  034 
$915 
$1,489 
$7,  903 
$149 

41 
312 
2,631 

224 

10,  892 
49 

3,755 
6,509 
628 
57.7 

47 
9,757 
1,088 
0.5 

186 
182 
$599,  122 
$586,  000 
$1?,  122 
$3,  292 
23 
$4,  193 
129 

5 
5 
$11,  000 

159 
$49,  597 
$19,  691 
$2,  006 
$9,435 

$6,  823 

$7,977 
$1,  639 
$233 
$274 
$1,  519 
$312 

11 
130 
897 

1,502 

58,  265 
39 

19,  735 
35,  286 
3,244 
55.9 

173 
50,375 
7,717 
03 

1,240 
1,183 
$1,  580,  925 
$1,  530,  855 
$50,  070 
$1,  336 
24 
$9,456 
882 

15 
9 

$20,800 

895 
$107,  933 
$49,  826 
$3,  313 
$28,565 

$2,  559 

$10,  994 
$4,  395 
$682 
$1,  215 
$6,  384 
$121 

30 
182 
1,734 

13.0 
15.7 

87.0 
84  3 

Members,  number.  _    _      

Avp,rj?.£rfl  mprnhpr^hip  P<*T  clviroh 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

16.0 
15.6 
16.2 

84.0 
84.4 
83.8 

J*  emale 

Sex  not  reported 

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

21.4 
16.2 
12  4 

78  6 
83.8 
87  6 

13  yesrs  and  over 

A?e  not  reported  

Percent  under  13  years2  

Church  edifices,  number 

13.0 
13.3 

27.5 
27.7 
20.8 

87.0 
86.7 
72.5 
72.3 
79.2 

Value  —  number  reporting  

Amount  reported  

Constructed  prior  to  1936.  _  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936_ 
Average  value  per  church  

Debt  —  number  reporting  . 

Amount  reported          -_                     .    _ 

30.7 
12.8 

69.3 
87.2 

Number  reporting  "no  debt"_ 

Parsonages,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting    _,             

Amount  reported    _ 

34.6 

15.1 
31.5 
2S.3 

37,7 
24.8 

72.7 

42  0 
27.2 
25.5 
18.4 
19.2 

65.4 

84.9 
68.5 
71.7 
62.3 
75.2 

27.3 

58.0 
72.8 
74.5 
81.  6 
80.8 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  ._ 

Amount  reported  

Pastors'  salaries  

All  other  salaries  

Repairs  and  improvements  

Payment    on    church    debt,    excluding 
interest-       _.                   -  -_ 

All   other   current   expenses,    including 
interest 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc.  . 
Uome  missions 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.  _ 
All  other  purposes 

Average  expenditure  per  church  

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Officers  and  teachers  

41.7 
34.1 

58.3 
65.9 

Scholars  

i  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

212 


PEIMITIVE    BAPTISTS 


213 


Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  compari- 
son, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Primitive  Baptists  for  the  census 
years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

1,726 

2,267 

2  142 

2,878 

Increase  1  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

—541 

125 

—736 

Percent...          _  _ 

—23.9 

5.8 

—25.6 

Members,  number  .                       .    ._ 

69,  157 

81,  374 

80,  311 

102,311 

Increase1  over  preceding  census: 
Number  _  

—12,217 

1,063 

—22,  000 

Percent  _  _  __  ._       _  _ 

—15  0 

1.3 

—21  5 

Average  membership  per  church            __            

40 

36 

37 

36 

Church,  edifices,  number  

1,426 

1,057 

1,  097 

2,003 

Value  —  nnTnber  reporting 

1,365 

1  037 

1  580 

1,953 

Amount  reported 

$2,  180  047 

$1,  730  348 

$1,  601,  807 

$1,  674,  810 

Average  value  per  church 

$1,  597 

$1  669 

$1  014 

$858 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

47 

67 

45 

68 

Amount  reported 

$13,  649 

$25,  734 

$12,  053 

$16,  207 

Parsonages,  number 

20 

Value  —  number  reporting  

14 

6 

7 

16 

Amount  reported  

$31,  800 

$13,  313 

$14,  900 

$38,  295 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

1,054 

776 

964 

ATTiQiTnt  rfiportp.rj 

$157,  530 

$166  847 

$96,  270 

Pastors'  salaries 

$69,  517 

All  other  salaries      

$5,  319 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$38,  000 

[    $140,678 

$92,  329 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest... 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc  

$9,  382 
$18,971 
$6,  034 

Home  missions  

$915 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution  

$1,489 

>      $16,  945 

$3,  941 

All  other  purposes 

$7,  903 

Not  classified 

$9,  224 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$149 

$215 

$100 

Sunday  schools: 
fhnrchfif?  reporting}  Twrnbp-r 

41 

5 

Officers  and  "teachers 

312 

25 

Scholars 

2,631 

181 

1  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 

State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Primitive  Bap- 
tists by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and  member- 
ship of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural  territory, 
membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4  gives  for 
selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years 
1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years 
of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  church  edi- 
fices and  the  amount  of  debt  on  such  property  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for 
1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improve- 
ments, benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics 
of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables  5  and  6  is  limited  to 
those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value  and  expenditures. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  7  presents,  for  each  association  of  the  Primitive 
Baptists,  the  more  important  statistical  data  for  1936  shown  by  States  in  the 
preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches,  membership,  value  of  church 
edifices,  and  expenditures. 


214 


CENSUS1   OF    RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    19 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGEAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEM- 
BERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

"3 
1 

1 

P 

2 
3 

"os 
1 

1 

1 
(§ 

o 

"e3 

% 

C3 

"3 

S 

o 

f=H 

2 

§1 

g^ 

CO 

Males  per  100 
females  i 

Churches  re- 
porting 

*o 

|S 

S 
•3 

2,631 

United  States  

1,726 

224 

1,502 

69,  157 

10,  892 

58,  265 
11 

23,490 

41,  795 

3,872 

56.2 

41 

312 

NEW  ENGLAND: 
IVTaine 

2 
1 

12 
2 
9 

38 
62 
39 

2 

6 

1 

1 

3 

1 
1 

7 
S 
4 
1 

1 

37 

26 

8 

29 

Miassachusetts 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

9 
1 

8 

31 
54 
35 
1 

6 
54 
4 
1 

131 
34 
98 

852 
2,972 
1,478 
25 

208 
2,561 
147 

54 
6 
18 

180 
543 
210 
9 

77 
28 
80 

672 
2,429 
1,268 
16 

208 
2,140 
147 

36 
106 

24 
11 
25 

276 

1,007 
524 
12 

74 
934 
56 
1 

18 
42 

107 
23 
73 

576 
1,800 
954 
13 

134 
1,627 
91 
6 

31 
113 

22.4 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NORTH  CENTEAL: 
Ohio 

47.9 
55.9 
54.9 

1 

10 

69 

Indiana 

165 

Illinois 

Michigan 

WEST  NORTH  CENTEAL: 
Iowa 

55.2 

Missouri 

62 

4 

8 

421 



57.4 

— 

.... 

Nebraska 

TRTaTifWis 

1 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC- 
Delaware 

4 
10 
1 
202 
45 
211 
11 
304 
67 

79 
131 
165 
64 

54 

n 

32 

89 

1 

1 
3 
1 
13 
5 
24 
1 
50 
11 

6 
19 
22 
5 

4 
1 
6 
16 

3 

7 

~~I§9 
40 

187 
10 
254 
56 

73 

112 
143 
59 

50 
10 
26 
73 

1 
3 

1 

49 
155 
70 
9,270 
1,259 
6,965 
289 
12,  913 
2,756 

3,204 
7,394 
6,515 
2,  550 

1,745 
359 
1,371 
3,637 

29 

59 

15 

13 
49 
70 
723 
140 
795 
25 
2,637 
458 

389 
1,668 
1,072 
238 

157 
9 
265 
694 

...... 

Maryland 

37.2 

District  of  Columbia.  _ 
Virginia..  

70 

8,547 
1,119 
6,170 
264 
10,  276 
2,298 

2,815 
5,726 
5,443 
2,312 

1,588 
350 
1,  106 
2,943 

29 
39 

15 

2,744 
447 
2,096 
106 
4,232 
949 

1,258 
2,635 
2,458 
948 

643 
136 
453 
1,333 

11 
25 

4 

5,738 
782 
4,689 
183 
7,700 
1,447 

1,772 
4,297 
3,837 
1,602 

982 
223 

768 
2,132 

18 
34 

11 

788 
30 
180 

47.8 
57  2 
44.7 
57.9 
55.0 
65.6 

71.0 
61.3 
64.1 
59.2 

65.5 
61  0 

12 

69 

713 

West  Virginia  

North.  Carolina 

South  Carolina 

2 
3 

22 

24 

152 
140 

Georgia 

981 
360 

174 
462 
220 

Florida... 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee  

14 
4 
1 

1 

115 
28 
4 

11 

1,059 
220 
30 

103 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas           

120 

Louisiana  

Oklahoma    ..  __ 

150 

172 

59.0 
62.5 

Texas 

3 

29 

145 

MOUNTAIN: 
Idaho   . 

Colorado  

4 
1 

1 

PACIFIC: 
California  

1  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


PRIMITIVE  BAPTISTS 


215 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

(Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926, 1916,  or  1906] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 

AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF  CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Un- 
der 
13 

years 

13 
years 
and 
over 

Age 

not  re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
131 

United  States 

1,726 

2,267 

2,142 

2,878 

69,  157 
37 

131 
34 
98 

852 
2,972 

1,478 

208 
2,561 

147 
7 

49 
155 
9,270 
1,259 
6,965 
289 
12,913 
2,756 

3,204 
7,394 
6,515 
2,550 

1,745 
359 
1,371 
3,637 

81,374 

80,  311 

102,311 

220 

60,  132 

8,805 

0.4 

NEW  ENGLAND. 
Maine  

2 

12 
2 
9 

38 
62 
39 

6 
62 

4 
1 

4 
10 
202 
45 
211 
11 
304 
67 

79 
131 
165 
64 

54 
11 
32 
89 

4 

4 

15 
3 

8 

50 
74 
62 

11 
71 
5 
5 

6 
13 
214 
52 
295 
18 
401 
73 

114 
158 
201 
101 

91 
18 

41 
154 

4 
23 

46 
95 
53 

10 
59 
6 

2 
9 

198 
14 
279 
11 
420 
60 

55 
208 
242 
101 

97 
12 

27 
88 

2 

20 
4 
20 

57 
147 
118 

25 

114 
5 
12 

7 
12 
232 
58 
272 
16 
439 
60 

159 
244 
303 
115 

108 
38 
28 
236 

53 

211 
89 
116 

1,204 
3,962 
2,300 

388 
2,858 
170 
126 

70 
223 
9,745 
1,343 
9,963 
490 
15,  317 
2,224 

4,365 
7,007 
6,483 
3,485 

1,979 
546 
1,390 
5,087 

57 
385 

68 

435 
225 
397 

1,588 
8,132 
5,163 

657 
4,040 
118 
207 

227 
251 
9,  642 
2,019 
10,207 
606 
16,  157 
1,781 

5,442 
10,  204 
9,772 
3,416 

2,591 
781 
587 
7,095 

37 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York  

131 

New  Jersey  

34 

Pennsylvania  

115 

1,308 
5,432 
2,621 

344 
2,636 
158 

98 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

Ohio  

9 

805 
2,943 
1,409 

208 

38 
29 
56 

1.1 

Indiana  

Illinois 

13 

.9 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Iowa  

Missouri      

23 
1 

2,501 
146 
7 

37 

.9 
.7 

Nebraska  

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Delaware  

61 
201 
9,314 
673 
10,481 
430 
15,  871 

49 

Maryland- 

155 

Virginia  

coco 

7,641 
1,173 
5,197 
249 
10,859 
2,492 

3,199 
6,689 
5,451 

2,548 

1,548 
359 

1,616 
83 
1,768 
39 
1,987 
256 

.2 
.3 

West  Virginia  

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina.. 

1 

67 

8 

5 
14 
9 
2 

10 

.4 
.6 
.3 

,2 

.2 
.2 
.1 

.6 

Georgia 

Florida 

1,898 

2,250 
8,925 
7,652 
3,401 

2,247 
398 
662 
2,543 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

Tennessee 

691 
1,055 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

187 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

6 
36 

1,007 
3,011 

59 

358 
590 

.6 
1.2 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 
Colorado      

PACIFIC: 
Washington 

5 
2 

6 

8 
10 

9 

106 
31 

111 

193 

157 

153 

Oregon 

Other  States 

>6 

9 

142 

180 



127 

15 

i  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

1  Includes  2  churches  in  Michigan;  and  1  m  each  of  the  following-— Massachusetts,  Idaho,  California, 
and  the  District  of  Columbia. 


216  GENSfUS1   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHUECH  DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

Total 
n!umber  of 
churches 

Number 
of  church 
edifices 

VALUE  OS1  CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

1,726 

1,426 

1,365 

$2,  180,  047 

47 

$13,  849 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

12 
9 

38 
62 
39 

6 
62 

4 

4 
10 
202 

45 
211 
11 
304 
67 

79 
131 
165 

64 

54 
11 
32 
89 

15 

10 
8 

36 
58 
36 

6 
55 
3 

5 

8 
152 
36 
184 
11 
270 
56 

53 
103 
135 
56 

39 
9 
20 
67 

10 

10 
8 

35 
56 
34 

5 
52 
3 

4 
7 
145 
35 
180 
9 
259 
55 

49 
99 
129 
54 

33 
9 
20 
66 

19 

24,  300 
17,000 

71,050 
109,  512 
66,  300 

7,100 
99,  295 
6,900 

22,500 
42,  000 
243,900 
53,  525 
357,  425 
6,350 
438,  190 
79,  800 

44,  960 
137,  890 
126,  992 
43,  600 

23,  558 
5,100 
28,000 
61,  700 

63,100 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

Indiana    

1 
1 

1 
1 

275 
100 

100 
400 

Illinois  

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Iowa  .  

Missouri 

Nebraska 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC. 
Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

3 

1 
5 
1 
11 

4 

2 

4 
2 

360 
254 
1,392 
446 
4,495 
1,235 

295 
2,720 
114 

West  Virginia  

North  Carolina 

South  Carolina  

Georgia 

Florida  

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky.    

Tennessee 

Alabama       ,  ,.  __  „__ 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

1 

160 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

2 

7 

312 
991 

Texas 

Other  States 

i  Includes  2  churches  each  in  the  States  of  Maine  and  New  Jersey;  and  1  in  each  of  the  following— Massa- 
chusetts, Kansas,  Idaho,  Colorado,  and  the  District  of  Columbia. 


PRIMITIVE    BAPTISTS 


217 


TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 


Total 
number 

of 
churches 


EXPENDITURES 


Churches 
reporting 


Total 
amount 


Pastors' 
salaries 


All  other 
salaries 


Eepairs 
and  im- 
provements 


United  States. . 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 

New  York 

Pennsylvania.  __. 


EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio™ 

Indiana __ 

Illinois 


WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Iowa 

Missouri. 

Nebraska 


1,726 


12 


SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 

Maryland.. 10 

Virginia 202 

West  Virginia 45 

North  Carolina 211 

South  Carolina. 11 

Georgia 304 

Florida 67 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Kentucky 79 

Tennessee 131 

Alabama 165 

Mississippi 04 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Arkansas... 54 

Louisiana 11 

Oklahoma 32 

Texas 

Other  States 19 


1,054 


8157,  530 


$69, 517 


4 

117 

28 

126 

8 

209 
43 


30 
6 
16 

51 

U3 


3,046 
798 


4,092 
5,942 
3,653 


813 

6,052 

338 


11, 341 
2,525 

14, 42S 
1,633 

49, 894 
3,693 


3,133 
10, 467 
9,412 
5,377 


3,981 

558 

1,708 

7,399 


1,835 
629 


1,796 
3,251 
2,101 


301 
2,762 


600 
2,262 

340 
3,270 

661 

26, 257 
1,452 


341 
5,369 
4,595 
2,226 


2,087 
383 
618 

3,545 

2,836 


$5,319 


30 


84 


169 


18 
443 


158 
30 


74 


74 
493 
423 
165 


567 

2 

31 

175 

802 


$38, 000 


48 


858 


20 

1,078 
110 


210 
5,047 

890 
6,080 

139 
9,828 

602 


1,403 
3,042 
1,777 


900 

124 

215 

1,052 

802 


*  Includes  2  churches  in  each  of  the  following  States^-New  Jersey,  Delaware,  and  Colorado;  and  1  in 
each  of  the  following*— Maine,  Massachusetts,  Michigan,  Kansas,  Idaho,  California,  and  the  District  of 
Columbia. 


218  CEisrsncrs1  OF  RELIGIOUS  BODIES,  1936 

TABLE  0. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 — Continued 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

EXPENDITURES  "-continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local 
relief 
and 

chanty 

Home 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral 
head- 
quarters 

Allother 
purposes 

United  States..  

$9,  382 

818,971 

93 
31 

618 
633 
187 

162 
1,901 

88 

$6,  034 

S915 

SI,  489 

$7,  903 

29 
60 

229 
208 
230 

330 

77 
140 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York- 

100 

Pennsylvania 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL. 
Ohio 

8 
665 

15 
20 

12 

137 
39 
12 

Indiana 

Illinois 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL 
Iowa 

Missouri 

65 

Nebraska 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC 
Maryland 

Virginia 

320 
710 
1,365 
248 
4,  335 
600 

1,765 
416 
1,465 
160 
3,591 
278 

1,567 
1,649 
312 
439 

76 

301 
26 

735 

65 
2,804 

244 

105 
244 
214 
455 

280 
20 
55 
236 

115 

465 
16 
179 

738 
58 
1,151 
108 
1,619 
236 

111 
638 
667 
272 

36 
29 
347 
598 

West  Virginia.  

16 
25 
222 
302 
155 

North  Carolina  

South  Carolina 

Georgia 

296 
52 

73 
130 
52 
5 

33 

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL- 
Kentucky 

Tennessee    -_            - 

500 
37 

41 
70 
38 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL 
Arkansas 

10 

Louisiana    .             .              _  _.  _ 

Oklahoma 

100 
419 

342 
1,339 

1,859 

Texas 

35 

5 

Other  States 

TABLE    7. — NUMBER   AND    MEMBERSHIP    OF    CHURCHES,    VALUE    OF    CHURCH 
EDIFICES,  AND  EXPENDITURES,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS,   1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Number 
of  mem- 
bers 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Total 

1,726 

69,  157 

1,365 

$2,  180,  047 

1,054 

$157,  530 

Alabama: 
Antioch 

14 
11 
2 
6 
8 

10 
12 
1 
14 
1 

3 
9 

7 
3 
5 

550 
463 
21 
99 
242 

423 
316 
31 
280 
10 

136 
260 
142 
140 
330 

8 
10 
2 
4 
6 

10 
12 

1 
4 
1 

3 

9 
7 
1 
5 

3,300 
9,050 

<U 

14,  572 

12,  850 
18,500 

(lm 
(*) 

2,200 
6,650 
5,600 
0) 
3.800 

5 
7 
2 
2 
6 

5 

140 
1,793 
W 
0) 
934 

412 

Beulah 

Buttahatctae  

Cane  Creek  

Conecuh  River 

Choctawhatchee 

Ebenezer 

Elk  Rivfir  (nf  TermRSSflft) 

1 
2 

8 

Fellowship 

Five  Mile  Creek  

Flint  River 

2 
5 
3 
1 
4 

0) 

383 
305 

WB.W 

Hillabee.  

Hopewell  __  -  . 

Little  Vine  

"fftywpr  WntTimpVft 

See  footnote  at  end  of  table. 


PK.IMITIVE    BAPTISTS' 


219 


TABLE    7. — NUMBER    AND    MEMBEESHIP    OP    CHUKCHES,    VALTTE    OF    CHURCH 
EDIFICES,  AND  EXPENDITURES,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS,  1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total 
number 
of 
churche 

Number 
of  mem- 
bers 

VALUE  OF  CHITECH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITUBES 

Churche 
reportin 

Amount 

Churche 
reportin 

Amount 

Alabama—  Continued. 
Mount  Zion   ___ 

22 

952 

266 
21 
92 
25 

23 

199 
280 
10 

28 
654 
457 
43 

67 
288 
93 
3U 
260 

103 
137 
325 
269 
224 

15 

11 
48 

21 
28 

70 

166 
12 
1,018 
64 

67 
39 
288 
1,000 

445 

448 
847 
168 
259 

9 
390 

964 
251 
187 

200 
559 
252 

242 
805 

19 

$14,000 
0) 

8 

09 

12 
3 

1 

$925 
203 
G) 
0) 

Mud  Creek  

New  Hope  

Patsaliga  . 

Pilgrims  Rest  „ 

1 

Primitive     Western     Union     (of 
Georgia)  _  

1 
2 
2 
1 

1 
5 
2 
2 

2 

8 

0) 

8 

0) 

(9 

1,368 

8 

eu 

Sand  Mountain  

3 

6 
1 

1 
7 

4 

5 

3 
9 
4 
2 
9 

4 
3 
14 
2 

5 

1 

1 
3 

2 
2 

1 

4 
1 
21 
1 

3 
2 

9 
24 

14 
13 
13 
3 
6 

1 

11 
22 
11 
4 

5 
14 
7 
4 
19 

4 
1 

2,000 
3,950 
09 

Second  Creek 

Sucarnoochee  

Tombigbee  (of  Mississippi)  

Wetumpka  

7 
3 
2 

1 
5 
3 
2 
6 

3 
3 

8 
2 
1 

7,600 

«t"° 

0) 
4,950 
1,200 
09 
4,000 

1,300 
1,700 
8,940 
(9 
C1) 

Willis  Creek 

"Unassociated  

Arkansas: 
Little  Zion 

Mountain  Springs 

New  Hope  _  

North  Ouachita  ._ 

1 
5 

4 
2 
8 
1 

(9 

354 

104 

0so5 
(9 

Point  Bemove 

Rich  Mountain,  . 

Salem  

South  Arkansas  

South  Ouachita-     .  . 

Sugar  Creek 

California: 
Union  (of  Oklahoma) 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

2 
1 
13 

« 

(9 

(9 

C9 
(9 

09 

(9 
(9 
1,492 

Colorado: 
West  Texas  (of  Texas) 

Unassociated 

1 

2 
2 

1 

3 

1 
18 
1 

2 
2 
8 

19 

7 
8 
9 
2 
5 

09 

0) 
09 

(9 
1,900 

0) 

37,300 
09 

09 

(I) 

7,150 
21,800 

4,800 
6,500 
15,  700 
(9 
9,050 

Delaware: 
Delaware.-  _ 

Salisbury  (of  Maryland) 

District  of  Columbia: 
Ketocton  (of  Virginia)  .  , 

Florida^ 
Antioch  .  

nhnntaw^atnhAA  (nf  Alftfuvma) 

TVfniiTlt  TCnnn 

"Patsaliga  (of  Alabama) 

Pilgrims  Rest 

1 
1 
6 
17 

4 
3 
10 
2 
6 

(9 

W337 
1,034 

378 
35 
3,478 
(9 
1,487 

St.  Mary's  River   

San  Pedro 

Suwannee 

Georgia: 
Alahabee  River  No.  1 

Alahabee  River  No.  2  

Bethel                      

Blue  Ridge 

Brushy  Creek  Union 

Conecuh  River  (of  Alabama)  
Ebenezer 

10 
19 
11 
4 

5 
12 
5 
3 
17 

9,600 
37,200 
8,330 
8,600 

13,500 
28,700 
5,000 
2,300 
35,200 

10 
19 
10 

4 

3 
4 
3 
1 
17 

1,221 
5,710 
369 
2,345 

1,413 
465 
680 
(9 
2,983 

F/checonnee          -  ..,-  -„„  

Euharlee 

Fellowship  

Friendship.                .  

Flint  River 

Harmony 

Little  River         

Lott's  Creek  

See  footnote  at  end  of  table. 


220 


OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE    7. — NUMBER   AND    MEMBERSHIP    OF    CHURCHES,    VALUE    OF    CHURCH 
EDIFICES,  AND  EXPENDITURES,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS,  1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 


Total 
number 

of 
churches 


Number 
of  mem- 
bers 


VALTTE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 


Churches 
reporting 


Amount 


EXPENDITUEES 


Churches 
reporting 


Amount 


Georgia— Continued. 

Lower  Canoochee 

Marietta 

New  Hope 

Ochlochee 

Ocmulgee _ 

Oconee 

Original  Upper  Canoochee 

Primitive  Baptist  Union 

Primitive  Western 

Primitive  Western  Union 

Pulaski 

Providence 

Salem 

St.  Mary's  River  (of  Florida) . 
Towaliga _ 

UpatoL 

Upper  Canoochee 

Yellow  River 

Unassociated 

Idaho: 

Skillet  Fork  (of  Illinois) 

Illinois: 

Central... 

Concord 

Kaskaskia _ 

Little  Wabash 

Muddy  River _ 

Salem 

Skillet  Fork... _ 

Wabash 

Unassociated 

Indiana: 

Blue  River 

Conn's  Creek _ _ 

Danville 

Little  Zion 

Mount  Salem.. 

Mississnewa _ _ 


Patoka 

Salem 

White  River.. 
White  Water.. 
Unassociated.. 


Iowa: 

Missouri  Valley- 
Western 

Unassoeiated 


Kansas: 

Turkey  Creek.. 


Kentucky: 

Burning  Spring 

Eastern  District  (of  Virginia) . 

Greenfield 

Highland 

Mates  Creek... _ 


New  Liberty 

North  District 

Powells  Valley 

Red  Bird 

Rock  Springs _ 

Soldier  Creek _ 

Spencer _ 

St.  Clairs  Bottom  (of  North  Caro- 
lina)  _ 


858 
51 


685 
161 


593 
402 
70 

295 

215 

65 

35 

467 


1,216 

405 
184 


107 
59 
204 
244 

72 

271 
104 
348 


599 
169 
17 
30 
111 
53 

740 
362 
459 
205 
227 


120 
62 
26 


567 
264 
399 
75 
240 

30 
224 
320 
200 
391 

103 
110 

13 


$56,  600 
0) 

3,050 
22,  300 
4,200 

12,  900 
14,  700 
22,  610 
22,  650 
0) 

8,600 
11,  100 


13,  950 

(0 

32,  300 
11,400 
7,050 


0) 


(0 

11,  900 
6,900 
2,800 

11,000 

7,500 


14,  550 


9,600 
7,750 
0) 


10, 250 
0) 

20, 900 
15,  500 
5,512 
18, 400 
19,  600 


0) 


3,900 
C1) 

8,500 
0) 

o 

C) 

4,150 
11,  900 
2,200 
3,450 

2,100 
0) 

0) 


$7,  096 

565 

660 

4,611 


320 

804 

708 

4,120 


828 
1,498 

(0 

0) 
1,430 

(0 

3,944 
1,122 
1,223 


646 


600 
241 


967 


0) 


774 


0) 


983 


773 
937 
773 
772 
661 


0 


247 

46 

1,200 


0) 


265 
141 
110 
55 


0) 
0) 

0) 


See  footnote  at  end  of  table 


PRIMITIVE   BAPTISTS' 


221 


TABLE    7. — NUMBER    AND    MEMBEKSHIP    OF    CHTJECHES,    VALUE   OF    CHURCH 
EDIFICES,  AND  EXPENDITURES,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS,  1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Number 
of  mem- 
bers 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
eporting 

Amount 

Churches 
eporting 

Amount 

Kentucky  —  Continued. 
Union  

4 
2 

2 
5 
3 
1 

2 

2 
2 
4 
2 

1 
2 

6 
11 
1 
1 
9 

7 
6 
2 
9 
1 

4 
5 
2 

2 
4 
9 
3 
3 

3 

4 
4 
11 
7 

4 
7 
1 

4 
2 

6 
4 
2 

7 
18 
16 
1 
10 

95 
173 

62 
189 
90 
18 

37 

26 

45 
66 
18 

3 

25 

314 
387 
2 
16 
370 

190 
155 
34 
482 
35 

143 
335 

87 

64 
47 
525 
93 
104 

98 
149 
54 
433 
541 

109 
245 
99 

147 
34 

57 
55 
19 

137 
423 
770 
30 
356 

2 

1 

1 
4 
3 
1 

2 

2 

2 

2 
1 

1 

C1) 
0) 

C1) 

$3,250 
1,000 
0) 

(1) 

8 

0) 
0) 

0) 

3 
1 

3 

$23 

(0 

CO 
471 

Unassociated  

Louisiana: 
Bythnia    

Louisiana    _ 

South  Ouachita 

Unassociated 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

5 

4 

0) 
0) 

0) 

(0 
(0 
0) 

(*) 

(I) 

383 

905 

Maine: 
Unassociated  -  .  ._ 

Maryland: 
Baltimore    _.. 

Ketocton.    _  

Salisbury        .  _    ..              .    . 

Unassociated 

Massachusetts: 
Unassociated 

Michigan: 
Mount  Pftlem 

Mississippi: 
Amite                -  -_    

6 
8 
1 

6,600 
6,300 
(0 

Bethany                                _  -  

"RnttaJiatctii6  Cof  Alabama) 

Fellowship 

1 
7 

5 

4 

(i) 
1,285 

508 
273 

Good  Hope  _    

8 

7 
6 

6,750 

4,950 
2,900 

Hopewell 

Little  Black       

Little  Vine  (of  Alabama) 

N"ew  TTope                                 

8 
1 

3 
5 
1 

2 

4 
9 
1 
I 

2 
4 
3 
9 
6 

4 
6 
1 

3 

2 

5 
3 
2 

7 
15 
13 

6,350 
0) 

2,000 
4,950 
(') 

(0 
4,750 
21,700 
0) 
0) 

16,500 
6,500 
7,395 
18,  000 

9,000 
6,800 
0) 

6,900 
<i) 

11,200 
10,000 
0) 

11,200 
12,700 
72,500 

6 

925 

Primitive 

Regular  Baptist    

3 

4 
1 

2 
2 
8 
2 

1 

2 
3 
2 
6 
6 

2 
5 

1 

4 
2 

4 
3 

310 
436 
(') 

(i) 
(13 

1,504 

0) 

w 

(%7 

CO 
480 
890 

C1) 
726 
C1) 

338 
Cl) 

746 
2,300 

TnmHg^ft^ 

Unassociated               -  -  -         

Missouri: 
Center  Creek               

Cuivre-Siloam                           

Fishing  River 

Harmony 

Little  Piney           

M!ount  Zion 

Nodaway                             --    _,--. 

Original  Mount  Zion 

Ozark                 - 

Salem                     -  •  

Two  Rivers                 

Yellow  Creek                   

Unassociated                    -    

Nebraska: 
Missouri  Valley 

New  Jersey: 
Delaware  River 

New  York: 
Lexinsrton-Roxbury 

Warwick  

Unassociated  ---  

North  Carolina: 
Abbotts  Creek                            

2 
11 
11 

(0 
1,064 
2,627 

Bear  Creek           

Black  Creek--*  

Carolina  
Contentnea  -  

6 

12,600 

5 

456 

See  footnote  at  end  of  table ; 


222 


GEN'S'TJS'    OF   UELIG-IOXJS   BODIES,    193  ti 


TABLE    7.- — NUMBER   AND    MEMBERSHIP    OF    CHURCHES,    VALUE    OF    CHURCH 
EDIFICES,  AND  EXPENDITURES,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS,  1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 


Total 
number 

of 
churches 


Number 
of  mem- 
bers 


VALUE  OF  CKUECH 
EDIFICES 


Churches 
reporting 


Amount 


EXPENDITURES 


Churches 
reporting 


Amount 


North  Carolina— Continued. 

Fishers  River __. 

Kehukee 

Little  River 

Lower  County  Line 

Mayo 


Mill  Branch 

Mountain  District 

Reorganized  Silver  Creek 

Roaring  River 

Salem .__ 

Senter _ 

Seven  Mile. 

Upper  County  Line _ 

Upper  Mayo 

White  Oak____ _._ 

Zion__ 

Unassociated 

Ohio- 
Miami 

Muskmgum 

Owl  Creek _ 

Sandusky __ 

Scioto 

Tates  Creek 

Union 

Unassociated 

Oklahoma: 

Center  Creek 

First  Primitive  (of  Oklahoma). 

Panhandle  and  Oklahoma 

Salem 

Turkey  Creek 

Union 

Washita_ 

Western 

Unassociated 

Pennsylvania* 

Delaware  River 

Juniata__ 

Unassociated- 


South  Carolina: 

Eastern  District  (of  Tennessee)  - 

Mill  Branch 

Prince  William.. .._. 


Tennessee: 

Big  Sandy 

Buffalo  River 

Collins  River 

Cumberland 

Eastern  District. 


Elk  River. 

Flint  River  (of  Alabama). 

Fountain  Creek 

Friendship  (of  Georgia) ... 

Greenfield.. 


Hiawassee 

Little  River 

Mississippi  River. 

Obion 

Powells  Valley 


Predestinarian 

Regular  Baptist _, 

Round  Lick _ 

See  footnote  at  end  of  table. 


551 


393 
152 


75 
134 
240 


346 
392 
513 

53 

370 


41 
180 

26 
191 

157 
112 
74 
71 


176 
422 
169 
130 
50 

72 
119 
146 

36 


140 
69 


192 

210 

91 

1,476 

297 
31 
25 
73 

421 

1,158 
7 

176 
240 
685 

162 
16 
372 


$11,300 

42, 425 

20,  700 

47,450 

2,900 

3,400 
9,300 

G) 
3,500 

11,  200 

5,800 
7,300 

26,  700 
4,000 

18, 050 

0) 
29, 800 


19,  550 
0) 
11, 000 

23, 000 
C1) 
0) 
(9 


0) 
7,900 


(0 

0) 
0) 
0) 
0) 


(0 
7,500 


0) 

2,450 

0) 


5,300 
1,990 


CO 
12,  500 

.6,200 


10,  600 

9,900 

(') 

7,000 
2,800 

18,  500 

3,050 
"~7,"466' 


849 
1,305 
1,164 

490 

(0 
321 


0) 
1,322 


548 
1,637 

0) 

1,038 

0) 
311 


P) 
1,003 

0) 
237 

655 
C1) 
0) 
(0 


(0 


0) 
(0 


593 


275 


(0 

446 

1,362 
(0 
0) 

0) 


2,607 

""""497 
(0 
1,414 

(1) 


PRIMITIVE   BAPTISTS' 


223 


TABLE   7. — NUMBER    AND    MEMBERSHIP   OF   CHURCHES,    VALUE    OF   CHURCH 
EDIFICES,  AND  EXPENDITURES,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS,  1936 — Continued 


ASSOCIATION 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Number 
of  mem- 
bers 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Tennessee—  Continued. 
Second  Creek  

3 

2 
1 
5 
14 
6 

I 
11 
1 
2 
3 

8 
4 
1 
2 
3 

4 
4 
1 
6 
3 
2 
11 
5 
3 
1 

4 
7 
2 

7 
26 
10 
1 
8 
1 
6 
9 
34 
1 

3 

18 
4 
2 
12 

8 
5 
9 
3 
19 

6 

10 

7 
18 
2 
3 
3 

5 
1 
5 
1 

126 

106 

14 
306 
612 
498 

36 
617 
30 
103 
91 

269 
143 
6 
24 
211 

205 
182 
33 
344 
155 

33 

357 
106 
119 
36 

213 
293 
31 

424 
1,920 
477 
13 
269 

6 
143 
423 
1,773 
40 

46 
697 
199 
95 
479 

207 
272 
290 
140 
815 

228 

218 

165 
673 
43 
33 
45 
187 
28 
63 
22 

3 
2 

1 
5 
8 
5 

1 
5 
1 
2 
3 

6 
3 
1 
1 
3 

1 
3 
1 
5 
3 

1 
8 
4 
2 
1 

4 
5 

2 

5 
13 
10 

1 
6 

1 
4 
9 
25 

1 

1 
12 
3 
1 
10 
5 
4 
9 
2 
15 

3 

4 

5 
15 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 
5 

$1,  300 
(0 

0) 
4,600 
11,  350 
24,200 

C1) 
6,500 
(0 
(0 
3,300 

3,400 
3,500 
0 
0) 
2,500 

(0 
2,600 
W 
4,550 
8,000 

(0 
5,750 
1,850 
(') 
(') 
3,500 
4,700 
0) 

33,  200 

14,700 
24,  300 
G) 
19,  150 

0) 
4,300 
18,800 
40,350 
G) 

(') 

20,900 
8,500 
0) 
11,550 

3,600 
3,450 
4,350 

21,  300 

3,850 
6,300 

10,700 
19,  125 
(i) 

(') 
CO 
5,000 
0) 
9,100 

2 
2 

(0 
(0 

Sequachie  Valley 

Stony  Creek  

Tennessee  and  Nolachucky  .  _ 

3 

8 
5 

1 
5 

$59 
650 
1,220 

(0 
959 

West  Tennessee  . 

Unassociated___       .    _ 

Texas: 
Bythnia  (of  Louisiana) 

Duffau 

East  Providence  

Enon                _  -  

2 
2 

7 
1 

(') 
(0 
795 
0) 

Friendship 

Little  Flock  and  Bosque  River  
Little  Hope  . 

Mount  Zion  

Neches  River_  _  _ 

2 
3 

3 
3 

(0 

475 

325 
322 

CVfnl  TTarmoTiy 

Panhandle    and    Oklahoma    (of 
Oklahoma) 

Pilot  Grove            

Predestf  n  arian  (of  Tennessee)  ,. 

Primitive  Baptist  - 

4 
1 

505 
(0 

Ral$Tn 

Southeast  Texas  

Southwest  Texas  

5 
2 

893 
0) 

Sulphur  Fork    _ 

Unity 

Wasketa 

1 

4 

4 
1 

3 
17 
S 
1 
6 

(') 
521 
700 
0) 

399 

876 
1,620 
0) 
898 

West  Providence  _. 

West  Texas  

TJnassociated  _  

Virginia: 
Dan  River            ..  

Eastern  District       

Ebenezer     -  -  - 

Kehuckee  

Ketocton            -  -- 

Lower  County  Line 

IVIayo 

3 
2 
22 

1 

38 

0) 
911 
0) 

Mountain 

New  River  No.  1     

New  River  No  2     

Piedmont 

Pigg  River               

11 
3 

1 
8 

4 
5 
4 
1 
7 

3 
6 

6 
8 
2 
1 
2 

4 
1 
4 

4,052 
46 
0) 
433 

272 
160 
96 
0) 

784 

58 
400 

418 
607 

8 

0) 
932 

0) 

89 

St  Glair's  Bottom 

Senter  (of  North  Carolina)  

Smith's  River  

Staunton  River    

Stony  Creek 

Three  Forks  (of  Powell  River) 

Union      

Washington   -  --    -  - 

Zion                  

Unassociated           -  -- 

West  Virginia: 
Elkhorn      - 

Indian  Creek        

Juniata                                  

Ketocton 

Mates  Creek 

New  Liberty 

Pocatalico            

Tygerts  Valley  -  -  

Unassociated 

284,748 

25,830 

. 

*  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 


224  OENSfU'S1   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

With  the  development  of  organized  church  life  shown  in  the  formation  of  be- 
nevolent and  particularly  of  missionary  societies,  of  Sunday  schools  and  similar 
organizations,  during  the  early  part  of  the  nineteenth  century,  there  developed 
also  considerable  opposition  to  such  new  ideas.  The  more  independent  church 
associations  were  based  on  the  principle  that  the  Scriptures  are  the  sole  and 
sufficient  authority  for  everything  connected  with  the  religious  life.  The  posi- 
tion taken  was,  in  brief,  that  there  were  no  missionary  societies  in  the  apostles 
days,  and  therefore  there  should  be  none  today.  Apart  from  this,  however, 
there  seemed  to  many  to  be  inherent  in  these  societies  a  centralization  of  author- 
ity which  was  not  at  all  in  accord  with  the  spirit  of  the  gospel.  Sunday  schools 
also  were  considered  unauthorized  of  God,  as  was  everything  connected  with 
church  life  that  was  not  included  in  the  clearly  presented  statement  of  the  New 
Testament  writers.  These  views  appeared  particularly  in  some  of  the  Baptist 
bodies,  and  occasioned  what  became  known  as  the  "antimission  movement. 

Apparently  the  first  definite  announcement  of  this  position  was  made  by  the 
Kehukee  Baptist  Association  of  North  Carolina,  formed  in  1765,  at  its  meeting 
with  the  Kehukee  Church  in  Halifax  County  in  1827,  although  similar  views 
were  expressed  by  a  Georgia  association  in  1826.  The  Kehukee  Association 
unanimously  condemned  all  "modern,  money-based,  so-called  benevolent  socie- 
ties "  as  contrary  to  the  teaching  and  practice  of  Christ  and  His  apostles,  and, 
furthermore,  announced  that  it  could  no  longer  fellowship  with  churches  which 
indorsed  such  societies.  In  1832  a  similar  course  was  adopted  by  the  Country 
Line  Association,  at  its  session  with  Deep  Creek  Church  in  Alamance  (then 
Orange)  County,  N.  C.,  and  by  a  "Convention  of  the  Middle  States"  at  Black 
Rock  Church,  Baltimore  County,  Md.  Other  Baptist  associations  in  the  North, 
South,  East,  and  West,  during  the  next  10  years,  took  similar  action.  In  1835 
the  Chemung  Association,  including  churches  in  New  York  and  Pennsylvania, 
adopted  a  resolution  declaring  that  as  a  number  of  associations  with  which  it 
had  been  in  correspondence  had  "departed  from  the  simplicity  of  the  doctrine 
and  practice  of  the  gospel  of  Christ,  *  *  *  uniting  themselves  with  the 
world  and  what  are  falsely  called  benevolent  societies  founded  upon  a  money 
basis,"  and  preaching  a  gospel  "differing  from  the  gospel  of  Christ,  it  would 
not  continue  in  fellowship  with  them,  and  urged  all  Baptists  who  could  not 
approve  the  new  ideas  to  come  out  and  be  separate  from  those  holding  them. 

The  various  Primitive  Baptist  associations  have  never  organized  as  a  denom- 
ination and  have  no  State  conventions  or  general  bodies  of  any  kind.  For  the 
purpose  of  self-interpretation,  each  association  adopted  the  custom  of  printing 
in  its  annual  minutes  a  statement  of  its  articles  of  faith,  constitution,  and  rules  of 
order.  This  presentation  was  examined  carefully  by  every  other  f  association, 
and,  if  it  was  approved,  fellowship  was  accorded  by  sending  to  its  meetings 
messengers  or  letters  reporting  on  the  general  state  of  the  churches.  Any  asso- 
ciation that  did  not  meet  with  approval  was  simply  dropped  from  fellowship. 
The  result  was  that,  while  there  are  certain  links  binding  the  different  associa- 
tions together,  they  are  easily  broken,  and  the  lack  of  any  central  body  or  even 
of  any  uniform  statement  of  belief,  serves  to  prevent  united  action.  Another 
factor  in  the  situation  has  been  the  difficulty  of  intercommunication  in  many 
parts  of  the  South.  As  groups  of  associations  developed  in  North  and  South 
Carolina  and  Georgia,  they  drew  together,  as  did  those  in  western  Tennessee, 
northern  Mississippi  and  Alabama,  and  Missouri,  while  those  in  Texas  had  little 
intercourse  with  any  of  the  others.  Occasional  fraternal  visits  were  made  through 
all  of  these  sections,  and  a  quasi  union  or  fellowship  was  kept  up,  but  this  has 
not  been  sufficient  to  secure  what  might  be  called  denominational  individuality 
or  growth.  This  is  apparent  in  the  variety  of  names,  some  friendly  and  some 
derisive,  which  have  been  applied  to  them,  such  as  "Primitive,"  "Old  School, 
"Regular,"  "Antimission,"  and  "Hard  Shell."  In  general,  the  term  "Primitive" 
lias  been  the  one  most  widely  used  and  accepted. 

DOCTRINE 

In  matters  of  doctrine  the  Primitive  Baptists  are  strongly  Calvinistic.  Some 
of  their  minutes  have  11  articles  of  faith,  some  less,  some  more.  They  declare 
that  by  Adam's  fall  or  transgression  all  his  posterity  became  sinners  in  the  sight 

i  This  statement,  which  Is  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Eeligious  Bodies,  1926, 
has  heen  approved  in  its  present  form  by  Elder  O.  H.  Cayce,  of  the  Primitive  Baptists,  Thornton,  Ark. 


PRIMITIVE   BAPTISTS'  225 

of  God;  that  the  corruption  of  human  nature  is  total;  that  man  cannot,  by  his 
own  free  will  and  ability,  reinstate  himself  in  the  favor  of  God;  that  God  elected 
or  chose  His  people  in  Christ  before  the  foundation  of  the  world;  that  sinners 
are  justified  only  by  the  righteousness  of  Christ  imputed  to  them;  that  the  saints 
will  all  be  preserved  and  will  persevere  in  grace  unto  heavenly  glory,  and  that 
not  one  of  them  will  be  finally  lost;  that  baptism  and  the  Lord's  Supper  are 
ordinances  of  the  gospel  in  the  church  to  the  end  of  time;  that  the  institutions 
of  the  day  (church  societies)  are  the  inventions  of  men,  and  are  not  to  be  fel- 
lowshiped;  that  Christ  will  come  a  second  time,  in  person  or  bodily  presence  to 
the  world,  and  will  raise  all  the  dead,  judge  the  human  race,  send  the  wicked  to 
everlasting  punishment,  and  welcome  the  righteous  to  everlasting  happiness. 
They  also  hold  uncompromisingly  to  the  full  verbal  inspiration  of  the  Old  and 
New  Testament  Scriptures. 

Some  Primitive  Baptists  maintain,  as  formulated  in  the  London  Baptist  Con- 
fession of  Faith  of  1689,  that  God  eternally  decreed  or  predestinated  all  things,  yet 
in  such  a  manner  that  He  does  not  compel  anyone  to  sin,  and  that  He  does  not 
approve  or  fellowship  sin.  The  great  majority  of  them,  however,  maintain  that, 
while  God  foreknew  all  things,  and  while  He  foreordained  to  suffer,  or  not  prevent 
sin,  His  active  and  efficient  predestination  is  limited  to  the  eternal  salvation  of 
all  His  people,  and  everything  necessary  thereunto;  and  all  Primitive  Baptists 
believe  that  every  sane  human  being  is  accountable  for  all  his  thoughts,  words, 
and  actions. 

Immersion  of  believers  is  the  only  form  of  baptism  which  they  acknowledge, 
and  they  insist  that  this  is  a  prerequisite  to  the  Lord's  Supper.  They  hold  that 
no  minister  has  any  right  to  administer  the  ordinances  unless  he  has  been  called 
of  God,  come  under  the  laying  on  of  hands  by  a  presbytery,  and.  is  in  fellowship 
with  the  church  of  which  ~he  is  a  member;  and  that  he  has  no  right  to  permit 
any  clergyman  who  has  not  these  qualifications  to  assist  in  the  administering  of 
these  ordinances.  In  some  sections  the  Primitive  Baptists  believe  that  washing 
the  saints'  feet  should  be  practiced  in  the  church,  usually  in  connection  with  the 
ordinance  of  the  Lord's  Supper.  Of  late  years  a  group  of  churches  in  Georgia 
have  used  organs  in  public  worship,  but  most  of  the  churches  are  earnestly 
opposed  to  the  use  of  instrumental  music  of  any  kind  in  church,  services.  Sunday 
schools  and  secret  societies  are  unauthorized.  These  are  claimed  not  to  be  in 
accordance  with  the  teachings  of  the  Bible. 

ORGANIZATION 

In  polity  the  Primitive  Baptists  are  congregational  in  that  they  believe  that 
each  church  should  govern  itself  according  to  the  laws  of  Christ  as  found  in  the 
New  Testament,  and  that  no  minister,  association,  or  convention  has  any  author- 
ity. They  believe  that  if,  in  the  view  of  its  sister  churches,  a  church  departs  in 
doctrine  or  order  from  the  New  Testament  standard,  it  should  be  labored  with, 
and  if  it  cannot  be  reclaimed,  fellowship  should  be  withdrawn  from  it.  Admission 
to  the  church  takes  place  after  careful  examination  by  the  pastor  and  church 
officers,  and  by  vote  of  the  church.  Ministers  are  ordained  by  the  laying  on  of 
the  hands  of  pastors  and  elders  called  by  the  church  of  which  the  candidate  is  a 
member.  No  theological  training  is  required.  The  gifts  of  the  candidate  are 
first  tested  by  association  with  pastors  in  evangelistic  work,  and  he  is  then 
recommended  for  ordination.  There  is  no  opposition  to  education,  the  position 
being  that  the  Lord  is  able  to  call  an  educated  man  to  preach  His  gospel  when 
it  is  His  will  to  do  so,  and  that  it  is  the  duty  of  the  minister  to  study,  and  especially 
to  study  the  Scriptures,  but  they  hold  that  lack  of  literary  attainments  does  not 
prevent  one  whom  the  Lord  has  called  from  being  able  to  preach  the  gospel. 

WORK 

Notwithstanding  the  strong  opposition  to  missionary  societies,  the  Primitive 
Baptists  are  by  no  means  opposed  to  evangelistic  effort,  and  preachers,  both 
regular  pastors  and  others  who  are  in  a  position  to  do  so,  travel  much  and  preach 
the  gospel  without  charge,  going  where  they  feel  that  the  Spirit  of  God  leads 
them,  and  where  the  way  is  opened  in  His  providence.  The  members  and  friends 
whom  they  freely  serve,  freely  contribute  to  their  support.  Although  opposed 
to  Sunday  schools,  they  believe  in  giving  their  children  religious  training  and 
instruction. 


COLORED  PRIMITIVE  BAPTISTS 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  "United  States,  with,  urban -rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Colored  Primitive  Baptists  for  the  year  1936  is 
presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have  been 
enrolled  in  the  local  churches  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by  immersion. 

TABLE  1. — SUMMARY  OP  STATISTICS  FOE  CHURCHES  IN  UEBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Clmrclies  (local  organizations)  t  number 

1,009 

43,  897 

44 

13,  318 
29,919 
660 
44  5 

1,644 
39,  591 
2,662 
4.0 

889 
876 
$1,643,804 
$1,  544,  076 
$99,  728 
$1,876 
98 
$68,  285 
625 

48 
44 
$76,966 

935 

$207,  352 
$108,  539 
$15,003 
$18,  906 

$13,482 

$21,  051 
$7,  619 
$2,  803 
$457 
$9,  665 
$9,  827 
$222 

353 

**y 

5,226 
12,  888 
300 
40.5 

600 
17,  146 
668 
3.4 

298 
291 
$969,  210 
$914,  826 
$54,  384 
$3,  331 
52 
$49,  754 
194 

35 

34 
$73,750 

334 

$117,  835 
$60,  261 
$8,  987 
$8,  170 

$9,373 

$14f  120 
$4,542 
$1,  523 
$198 
$5,342 
$5,  319 
$353 

656 

25,  483 
39 

8,092 
17,  031 
3fiO 

47,5 

1,044 
22,  445 
1,994 
4.4 

591 
585 
$674,  594 
$629,  250 
$45,  344 
$1,  153 
46 
$18,  531 
431 

13 
10 
$3,216 

601 
$89,  517 
$48,278 
$6,  016 
$10,  736 

$4,109 

$6,  931 
$3,077 
$1,280 
$259 
$4,323 
$4,508 
$149 

35.0 
41.9 

65  0 

58.1 

members,  number  _                   ... 

AvfTHgft  "mATTibftrshlp  p^r  cTiurch 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

39.2 
43.1 
45.5 

60.8 
56.9 

54.5 

Female 

Sex  not  reported 

Males  per  100  females,  .       ._  _..  _  .. 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years 

36  5 
43  3 

25  1 

63.5 
56.7 
74.9 

13  years  and  over 

Age  not  reported 

Percent  under  13  years  2       ,    . 

Clmrch  edifices,  number 

33.5 
33  2 
59.0 
59.2 
54.5 

66  5 
66.8 
41  0 
40  8 
45  5 

Value  —  number  reporting   _._ 

Amount  reported 

Constructed  prior  to  1936-  

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church  

Debt  —  number  reporting     __  

Amount  reported 

72.9 
31  0 

27.1 
69.0 

Number  reporting  "no  debt"         

Parsonages,  number 

Value  —  number  reporting.,..  ^     „„„  .    __  ~ 

Amount  reported 

95.8 

35.7 
56.8 
55  5 
59.9 
43.2 

69.5 

67.1 
59.6 
54.3 
43.3 
55.3 
54.1 

4.2 

64.3 
43.2 

44.5 
40.1 
56.8 

30.5 

32.9 
40.4 
45  7 
56.7 
44.7 
45.9 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  r^port-i'Tig,  number 

Amount  reported  ______ 

Pastors*  salaries 

All  other  salaries  -_  —    -  ._  -    .    . 

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest. 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Eed  Cross,  etc___ 
Home  missions       __    . 

Foreign  missions  

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.  _ 
All  other  purposes 

Average  expenditure  per  church  __ 

i  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

226 


COLORED    PRIMITIVE    BAPTISTS 


227 


TABLE    3. — SUMMARY    OP   STATISTICS    FOR    CHURCHES   IN   URBAN   AND    RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEECENT  OF 
TOTAL  * 

Urban 

Rural 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  

422 
2,760 
13,  572 

13 
56 
460 

6 
29 
201 

1 
8 
32 

177 
1,238 
6,488 

8 
40 
335 

2 

8 
20 

245 
1,522 
7,084 

5 

16 

125 

4 
21 
181 

1 
8 
32 

41.9 
44.9 
47.8 

58.1 
55.1 
52  2 

Officers  and  teachers  

Scholars    .    „ 

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers.. 

Scholars  

72  8 

27  2 

Weekday  religious  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  _  

Officers  and  teachers.  

Scholars 

10  0 

90.0 

Parochial  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  

Officers  and  teachers  

Scholars 

i  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  compari- 
son, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Colored  Primitive  Baptists  for 
the  cjens<us  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  STJMMABY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

1,009 

925 

336 

787 

Increase  :  over  preceding  census: 

"Miimhpr 

84 

589 

—451 

Percent    .  .               -          

9.1 

175  3 

—  57.3 

MemfapTS,  Timber 

43,  897 

43,  978 

15,  144 

35,  076 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 

Miimhw 

81 

28,  834 

—19,  932 

Percent 

—0  2 

190.4 

-56.8 

Av^r^ge  TTi6rnbfiT*'^iip  pp-r  nhxirch 

44 

48 

45 

45 

Glmrch  edifices,  number 

889 

91 

236 

501 

Value  —  number  reporting  

876 

87 

164 

501 

Amount  rftprtrtod 

$1,  643,  804 

$171,  518 

$154,  690 

$296,  539 

Average  value  per  church 

$1,  876 

$1,  971 

$943 

$592 

Debt  —  number  reporting 

98 

15 

46 

34 

Amount  reported 

$68,285 

$9,  793 

$8,507 

$6,  968 

Parsonages,  number 

48 

VahiQ  —  -number  reporting 

44 

12 

21 

Amount  reported  _  

$76,  966 

$13,  940 

$10,095 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting  nuTnb$T" 

935 

111 

170 

A  mount  reported                                       

$207,  352 

$39,  419 

$22,  881 

Pastors'  salaries                                   

$108,  539 

All  other  salaries      

$15,  003 

Tlepairs  and  iTnprovfiTr?eTi^s 

$18,  906 

[•      $28,  874 

$20,000 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest  
All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest- 
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc 

$13,  482 
$21,  051 
$7,  619 

JTom.e  missions 

$2,803 

Foreign  missions 

$457 

\      $12,  052 

$2,881 

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution 

$9,  665 

All  other  purposes                               

$9,  827 

Not  classified 

$493 

Average  expenditure  per  church 

$222 

$355 

$135 

Sunday  schools  ; 
C  hurches  reporting,  number                      

422 

24 

87 

166 

Officers  and  teachers                                  

2,760 

179 

406 

911 

Scholars  

13,  572 

2,278 

3,201 

6,224 

A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 
275318 — 41 16 


228 


CENSUS    OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1930 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  Colored  Primi- 
tive Baptists  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number  and 
membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or  rural 
territory,  membership  classified  by  sex>  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4 
gives  for  selected  States  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four 
census  years  1906  to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as 
"under  13  years  of  age"  and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the 
value  of  churches  and  parsonages  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices 
for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately 
current  expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing 
the  financial  statistics  of  any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables 
5  and  6  is  limited  to  those  States  in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  value 
and  expenditures. 

TABLE  3. — NTJMBEB  AND   MEMBERSHIP  OP   CHTJKCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TEEEITOBY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 

MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY 
SEX 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

I 

1 

6 

? 
& 

*3 

"o 
EH 

a 

1 

P 

g 

3 

•3 

S 

r2 
5 

<o 
»-. 

!t 

o 

CQ 

§„ 

&! 
1 

44.5 

Churches  re- 
porting 

Officers  and 
teachers 

g 

•i 

-E3 

o 
03 

United  States  

NEW  ENGLAND: 
ConnBcticut 

1,009 

853 

656 

43,  897 

18,414 
34 

126 
157 
765 

269 
53 
188 
110 

113 
30 

16 
70 
12 
1,762 

T<J66 
6,043 

458 
2,710 
2,091 
94 

148 
10 
66 
1,429 

25,483 

13,  SIS 

29,  919 

660 

422 

2,780 

13,  572 

I 

3 
6 
19 

12 
2 

1 

3 
6 

18 

12 
2 

34 

126 
157 
798 

298 
53 
188 
110 

144 
71 

15 
10 
1,336 
62 
3,649 
115 
4,  385 
9,870 

474 
4*649 
12,  079 
674 

491 
175 
258 
3,676 

9 

46 
58 
343 

100 

25 

80 
99 
455 

198 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 



1 
4 

12 

5 

4 
IS 
89 

27 

70 
77 
405 

82 

New  Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

1 
1 

33 
29 

"""53 

75.4 
50.5 

EAiT  NOKTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

Indians 

Illinois 

8 

8 

39 
30 

15 
18 

9 
3 
412 
22 
952 
52 
1,116 
2,967 

140 
1,266 
3,994 
221 

156 
44 
91 
1,215 

114 
80 

28 
53 

6 
7 
905 
40 
2,613 
63 
3,239 
6,903 

303 
3,164 
7,997 
453 

335 
131 
167 
2,461 

35 

34.2 

2 

10 

42 

Jvtichi£C9.n 

3 

WESTNORTH  CENTRAL- 
Missouri 

5 
7 

I 

^      3 
4 

2 
3 

1 

31 
41 

15 

101 

1 

1 

11 
8 

65 

18 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
IMCaryland. 

District  of  Columbia 
Virginia 

1 
72 
4 
119 
2 

1 
4 
1 

38 

68 
3 
81 
2 
118 
82 

1 
67 
138 

24 

17 
4 
7 

36 

1,266 
50 
1,887 
115 
2,719 
3,827 

16 
1,939 
9,988 
580 

343 
165 
192 
2,247 

19 

45.5 

7 

53 

278 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  
South  Carolina 

84 

36  4 

18 
2 
18 
139 

4 
35 
116 
6 

2 
. 

46 

145 
10 

98 
859 

28 
240 
780 
26 

10 
__ 

328 

774 
55 
482 
4,382 

111 
1,343 
3,779 
133 

57 

56 
1,363 

Georgia.    __ 

172 

150 

9 

121 
169 
29 

25 
5 
9 
54 

54 
68 

8 
54 
31 
5 

8 
1 
2 
18 

30 

31 

219 
88 

34.5 
43.0 

46.2 
40  0 
49.9 

48  8 

48.6 
33.6 
54.5 
49.4 

Florida  .._ 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  _ 

Tennessee  

Alabama. 

Mississippi  „ 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

Louisiana  
Oklahoma  ...   

Texas 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  la  less  than  100 


COLORED   PRIMITIVE   BAPTISTS  229 

TABLE 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936, 1926, 1916,  or  1906] 


NUMBER  AND  MEMBEBSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1036 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

Un- 
der 13 
years 

13 

years 
and 
over 

Age 
not  re- 
ported 

Per- 
cent 
under 
13  1 

United  States       

1,009 

925 

336 

787 

43,  897 
126 

43,978 

15,  144 

35,  078 

1,644 

39,  591 

2,662 

4  0 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  York 

3 

45 

81 
157 

35.7 

New  Jersey  

6 

157 

Pennsylvania        

19 

13 

8 

8 
7 

5 

2 

798 

298 
188 

368 
126 

104 

,   45 

3 

1 

749 

297 
170 
109 

144 

46 

.4 
.3 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

Illinois  

18 

Michigan 

3 

110 

1 

.9 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri                  _  - 

5 

144 

Kansas 

7 

72 
4 
119 
172 
150 

9 
121 
169 
29 

25 
5 
9 

54 

27 

10 

30 
5 
102 
199 
126 

14 
85 
188 
37 

25 
19 
3 
61 

6 

71 

1,336 
62 
3,649 
4,385 
9,870 

474 
4,649 
12,  079 
674 

491 
175 
258 
3,676 

227 

114 

436 
119 
2,626 
9,251 
7,086 

559 
2,485 
15,  177 
1,443 

1,441 
994 
44 
1,590 

119 

71 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

31 

"~~32 
106 
32 

10 
21 
38 
13 

31 
9 
..... 

64 
3 
62 
146 
128 

5 
93 

186 
27 

19 
4 
5 
43 

930 

i« 

10 

1,135 
62 

191 

.9 

West  Virginia  

North  Carolina 

1,000 
2,924 
3,510 

318 
811 
3,416 

184 

519 
138 

2,215 
4,531 
5,350 

228 
3,268 
14,829 
554 

840 
201 
100 
1,280 

53 

85 
515 

1 
72 
656 
22 

10 
5 
8 
146 

11 

3,228 
3,699 
9,201 

473 
4,452 
10,  878 
564 

469 
140 
165 
3,131 

216 

368 
601 
154 

1.6 
2.2 
5.3 

.2 
1.6 

5.7 
3.8 

2.1 
3.4 
4.6 
4.5 

4.8 

Georgia 

Florida       

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  

Tennessee     

125 
545 

88 

12 
30 
85 
399 

Alabama 

Mississippi  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana  

Oklahoma 

Texas 

1,290 

Other  States 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 

* Includes:  Connecticut,  1;  Indiana,  2;  Maryland,  1;  District  of  Columbia,  I;  and  South  Carolina,  2. 


230 


GEN'SOJS    OF    RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OP  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES  AND  AMOUNT  or  CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  01  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF  PAR- 
SONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States  

1,009 

889 

876 

$1,643,804 

98 

$68,  285 

4,480 
14,800 

5,000 
1,000 

1,100 

44 

$76,  966 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
New  Jersey  

6 
19 

13 

8 

5 

7 

72 
4 
119 
172 
150 

9 
121 
169 
29 

25 
5 
9 
54 

13 

4 
11 

6 
5 

3 
3 

64 
4 
105 
165 
144 

8 
101 
154 
27 

21 

4 
8 

44 

8 

4 
9 

5 
5 

3 
3 

62 
3 

103 
164 
144 

8 
100 
153 
27 

21 
4 
8 
43 

27 

14,800 
78,  350 

9,027 
8,500 

11,700 
1,800 

55,994 
7,400 
113,  617 
157,  271 
497,300 

10,  200 
213,281 
338,  605 
23,854 

13,  145 
5,800 
7,100 
65,824 

10,  236 

4 
3 

2 
1 

2 

1 
4 

0) 
15,  500 

Pennsylvania  __.  

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL* 
Ohio 

Illinois—    -  - 

1 

1 
1 

0) 

0) 
C1) 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL- 
Missouri 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

5 

614 

West  Virginia 

North  Carolina  

7 
7 
18 

2 
11 
20 
3 

2 

2,598 
2,425 
10,  464 

1,400 
5,390 
11,  994 

174 

725 

4 

1,700 

Georgia 

Florida 

25 

46,850 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky     ,    _ 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

5 

4,564 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTEAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas  —    

11 

6,121 

1 
1 

C1) 
8,352 

Other  States 

1  Amount  included  in  figures  for  "Other  States,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  individual  church. 

2  Includes:  Connecticut,  1;  Indiana,  2;  Michigan,  1;  Maryland,  1;  and  South  Carolina,  2. 


COLORED    PRIMITIVE    BAPTISTS 


231 


TABLE  6. — CHTTKCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Repairs 

and  im- 
provements 

United  States  

1,009 

935 

S207,  352 

$108,  539 

SI  5,  003 

$18,  908 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC- 
New  York    

3 

6 
19 

13 
8 
3 

5 

7 

72 
119 
172 
150 

9 

121 
169 
29 

25 
5 
9 

54 

11 

3 

5 
19 

13 
8 
3 

4 
7 

64 
100 
149 
148 

9 

115 
163 
29 

21 
4 
8 

54 

19 

1,037 

2,708 
8,617 

4,075 
2,638 
815 

802 

144 

5,098 
14,  702 
18,083 
58,492 

2,497 
25,084 
41,  561 
2,877 

1,530 
806 
976 
13,  179 

1,631 

603 
1,050 
2,712 

1,310 
827 
159 

120 
87 

2,232 

5,847 
11,  515 
34,546 

966 
13,  731 
21,  467 
1,712 

887 
515 
712 
6,831 

710 

New  Jersey 

273 

407 

288 
119 
361 

187 

51 

465 

Pennsylvania  __  

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio                   .  . 

Illinois 

150 
90 

50 
16 

770 
3,109 
2,105 
3,594 

121 
1,094 
5,206 
294 

117 
30 
53 

1,471 

120 

Michigan           _  _      _  _ 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri 

Kansas  _  

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

358 
867 
647 
4,626 

232 
2,000 
3,162 
207 

171 
50 

North  Carolina  

Georgia 

Florida    

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky          „ 

Tennessee  

Alabama                , 

Mississippi  

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  

Louisiana 

Oklahoma    

Texas 

819 
229 

Other  States  

1  Includes:  Connecticut,  1;  Indiana,  2;  Maryland,  1;  District  of  Columbia,  1;  West  Virginia,  2;  and 
South  Carolina,  2. 


232 


CEOSPSfUS1   O'F   KEOGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITUBES  BY  STATES,  1936 — Continued 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


EXPEND! 

TUEES—  CO 

ntmued 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

Payment 
on  church 
debt, 
excluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local  re- 
lief and 
charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral head- 
quarters 

All  other 
purposes 

United  States 

S13  482 

$21  051 

S7,  619 

$2,  803 

$457 

$9,  665 

$9,  827 

MIDDLE  ATLANTIC: 
Now  York 

260 

113 

13 

48 

New  Jersey 

766 

327 

100 

5 

87 

49 

T>ennsylv8''niflf 

2,193 

2,392 

107 

35 

91 

215 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

742 

1  377 

45 

59 

254 

Illinois      _    _      -    -    --    - 

200 

1,065 

45 

11 

41 

180 

Michigan 

180 

25 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri 

290 

70 

7 

38 

40 

Kansas 

15 

26 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Virginia 

642 

415 

238 

189 

101 

153 

North  Carolina  -      .    ,    - 

1.106 

1,694 

373 

341 

151 

537 

677 

Georgia 

282 

1,084 

205 

55 

1,068 

1,122 

Florida 

1,912 

2,978 

3,126 

910 

76 

4,591 

2,133 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTEAL: 
Kentucky 

300 

632 

79 

31 

136 

Tennessee       .-  --    - 

1,204 

3,587 

972 

100 

731 

1,665 

AlafaftiTioa             -      ,-,... 

2.393 

3,300 

1,581 

598 

144 

1,748 

1,962 

Mississippi 

115 

367 

65 

14 

1 

45 

57 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

25 

231 

31 

14 

5 

49 

Louisiana 

94 

52 

35 

30 

Oklahoma 

100 

50 

25 

36 

Texas                        -    _ 

1,032 

821 

369 

434 

85 

363 

954 

Other  States  

292 

93 

30 

86 

71 

COLORED    PRIMITIVE   BAPTISTS  233 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION1 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  history  of  the  Colored  Primitive  Baptists  is  the  same  as  that  of  the  white 
Primitive  Baptists  up  to  the  time  of  the  Civil  War.  During  slave  times  the 
colored  Primitive  Baptists  had  full  membership  in  the  white  churches,  although 
seats  were  arranged  for  them  in  a  separate  part  of  the  house.  Before  the  war 
some  of  the  colored  members  of  the  churches  were  engaged  in  the  work  of  the 
ministry,  many  of  them  being  considered  very  able  defenders  and  exponents  of 
the  doctrine  of  the  Bible.  Such  men  were  sometimes  bought  from  their  owners 
and  set  free  to  go  out  and  preach  where  they  felt  it  was  the  Lord's  will  for  them 
to  go. 

After  the  Negroes  were  freed,  many  of  them  desiring  to  be  set  apart  into 
churches  of  their  own,  the  white  Primitive  Baptists  granted  them  letters  certify- 
ing that  they  were  in  full  fellowship  and  good  standing;  white  preachers  organized 
them  into  separate  churches,  ordained  their  preachers  and  deacons,  and  set 
them  up  in  proper  order,  throughout  the  South;  and  thus,  gradually,  the  colored 
Primitive  Baptists  became  a  separate  denomination. 

DOCTRINE  AND  ORGANIZATION 

The  doctrinal  principles  and  the  polity  of  the  Colored  Primitive  Baptists  are 
precisely  the  same  as  those  of  the  white  Primitive  Baptists.  Each  local  church 
is  an  independent  body  and  has  control  of  its  own  affairs,  receiving  and  dis- 
ciplining its  own  members;  there  is  no  appeal  to  a  higher  court. 

About  the  year  1900  a  "progressive"  move  was  introduced  among  the  Colored 
Primitive  Baptists,  and  a  large  number  of  them  began  the  organization  of  aid 
societies,  conventions,  and  Sunday  schools,  some  of  these  organizations  being 
based  on  the  payment  of  money — things  which  the  Primitive  Baptists  have  not 
engaged  in  and  which  they  have  always  protested  against. 

*  No  revision  of  history,  doctrine,  or  organization  was  furnished  by  this  body  for  1936,  hence  this  state- 
ment is  the  same  as  that  published  in  Eeligious  Bodies,  vol.  II,  1926.  No  data  are  available  for  "Work" 
in  1936. 


TWO-SEED-IN-THE-SPIRIT   PREDESTINARIAN   BAPTISTS 


STATISTICS 


Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit  Predestinarian  Baptists 
for  the  year  1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of 
these  figures  between  urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have  been 
admitted  to  the  local  churches  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by  immersion. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMAKY  OF  STATISTICS  FOR  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 

territory 

In  rural 

territory 

PERCENT    OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Clmrclies  (local  organizations),  number  .    . 

16 

201 
13 

66 
107 
28 
61.7 

2 

65 
33 

28 

37 

14 

136 
10 

38 
70 
28 

Me  inters,  number 

323 

67.7 

Average  membership  per  church-  

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

Female 

34.6 

65.4 

Sex  not  reported. 

Males  per  100  females  a 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years,.  .    

13  years  and  over 

173 
28 

13 
13 
$6,600 
$5,800 
$800 
$508 
5 

10 
$660 
$260 

$120 

$208 
$10 
$62 
$66 

65 

108 
28 

11 
11 
$5,300 
$4,500 
$800 
$482 
4 

9 

$500 
$160 

$120 
$158 

37.6 

62.4 

Age  not  reported       -           _ 

Church  edifices,  number  ...    

2 
2 

$1,  300 
$1,300 

Value  —  number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

19.7 
22.4 

80.3 
77.6 
100.0 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  — 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936. 
Average  value  per  church  

$650 

1 

$160 
$100 

Number  reporting  "no  debt"  

Expenditures: 

ChtiT"chps  reporting,  TiurnhBr 

AiTiOTiiit  reported 

24.2 
38.5 

75.8 
61.5 

100.0 
76.0 

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  inter- 
est 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest   .                              

$50 
$10 

24.0 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Eed  Cross,  etc  
All  other  purposes  

$62 
$56 

Average  expenditure  per  church  _  >  

$160 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

*  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1906-36. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for  com- 
parison, a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit 
Predestinarian  Baptists  for  the  census  years  1936,  1926,  1916,  and  1906. 

234 


TWO-SEED'-IN-THE-'SPXRIT   'PKEDESTXJSTATIIAN    BAPTISTS 


235 


TABLE  2. — COMPABATIVB  SUMMARY,  1906  TO  1936 


ITEM 

1936 

19S6 

1916 

1906 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number 

16 

27 

48 

55 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 
Number 

—  11 

—21 

7 

Percent2  __.  ._  _. 

Members,  number  

201 

304 

679 

781 

Increase  l  over  preceding  census: 
Number  

—103 

—375 

—102 

Percent     

—33  9 

—55  2 

—13  1 

Average  membership  per  church  

13 

11 

14 

14 

Church  edifices,  number.  _    . 

13 

24 

37 

38 

Value  —  number  reporting.  . 

13 

24 

35 

32 

Amount  reported.-  _ 

S6  600 

$19  350 

$23  950 

$21,  500 

Average  value  per  church  

$508 

$806 

$684 

$672 

Expenditures  : 
C  hurches  reporting,  number  

10 

20 

Amount  reported 

$660 

$473 

$170 

Repairs  and  improvements 

$^60 

1 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  interest   _  . 

$120 

>            $288 

$170 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  interest  
Local  relief  and  charity,  Red  Cross,  etc  

208 
$10 

}             $S5 

Not  classified          _  _  . 

$62 

$100 

Average  expenditure  per  church  __- 

$66 

$24 

$24 

*  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


2  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  and  5  present  the  statistics  for  the  Two-Seed-in- 
the-Spirit  Predestinarian  Baptists  by  States,  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for 
1936  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their 
location  in  urban  or  rural  territory  and  the  membership  classified  by  sex.  Table  4 
gives  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  four  census  years  1906 
to  1936,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "13  years  of  age 
and  over/'  so  far  as  reported.  Table  5  shows,  for  1936,  the  value  of  church 
edifices  and  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses, 
improvements,  benevolences,  etc. 

Ecclesiastical  divisions. — Table  6  presents,  for  each  association  of  the  Two- 
Seed-in-the-Spirit  Predestinarian  Baptists,  the  more  important  statistical  data 
for  1936  shown  by  States  in  the  preceding  tables,  including  number  of  churches, 
membership,  value  of  church  edifices,  and  expenditures. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND   MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  AND  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NTJ 
CI 

MBER 
ITJRCHE 

OF 
S 

ND 
M 

MBER 
EMBER 

OF 
S 

MEK 

[BERSB 

IP  BY 

SEX 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 

& 

0  0 

AND  STATE 

-w1"0 

3 

•S 

1 

3 

JQ 

13 

"S 

a 

Xft 

« 

EH 

t> 

tf 

EM 

t> 

PS 

^ 

* 

CO 

^l« 

United  States  

16 

2 

14 

201 

85 

136 

66 

107 

28 

61.7 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 

Kentucky      .  

6 

6 

46 

46 

13 

24 

9 

Tennessee                    

9 

1 

8 

98 

8 

90 

28 

51 

19 

1 

1 

57 

57 

25 

32 

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  tban  100. 


236 


OF  RELIGIOUS  BODIES,  1936 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBEESHIP  OF  CHURCHES,  1906  TO  1936,  AND  MEM- 
BERSHIP BY  AGE  IN-  1936,  BY  STATES 


STATE 

NUMBER  OP  CHUKCHES 

NUMBER  OP  MEMBEES 

MEMBEESHIP  BY 
AGE,   1936 

1936 

1936 

1916 

1906 

1936 

1926 

1916 

1906 

13  years 
and 
over 

Age  not 
re- 
ported 

United  States  

16 

27 

48 

55 

201 

304 

679 

781 

173 

28 

Indiana 

4 
3 

4 

58 
68 

41 

Illinois 

Missouri 

1 
4 
3 

6 
19 
3 
2 
3 

1 
5 
3 

9 
19 
2 
10 
2 

12 
34 
19 

101 
252 
51 
32 
52 

14 
44 
28 

144 
279 
32 
175 
24 

Georgia 

1 
2 

9 
13 
2 

3 

6 

90 
145 
60 

Florida 

Kentucky 

6 
9 
1 

46 
98 
57 

37 
79 

57 

9 

19 

Tennessee 

AJabfVT1  a  -.  v 

Arkansas 

Texas       .                  -    .._  

TABLE  5. — VALUE  OP  CHURCHES  AND  CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 


§3 

VALUE  OF 

H 

« 

CHURCH 

EXPENDITUBES 

y 

43 

EDIFICES 

0 

O 

o 

rf  w 

irS  « 

~  bO 

STATE 

8 

'o  §5 

ft 

ft 

rt 
S 

gg 

°i.2 

1-S.S 

4gjSH 

& 

o 

W> 

y.       M 

o 

s 

4J.'an"!+a 

*••  of  bJt) 

"3'C 

p'g. 

rt 

,0 

jl'H 

q 

^"•g 

1 

.§  ^ 

0"^   § 

S  3.9-g 

r^"! 

r€3  O 

18 

a 

i  P. 

o 

3  P. 

*a 

«5  2 

P.O. 

S-§ 

§  a  Js  | 

03  T3 

o 

£ 

£ 

O 

4 

6 

§ 

S.H 

«  -  «>-9 

PH 

o 

3s 

^ 

United  States  

16 

13 

13 

$6,  600 

10 

$660 

$260 

$120 

$208 

$10 

$62 

Kentucky 

6 

3 

3 

900 

4 

164 

122 

42 

Tennessee..  

9 
1 

9 

1 

5,700 

6 

496 

260 

120 

86 

10 

20 

Alabama  --    .-  

i  Amount  for  Alabama  combined  with  figures  for  Tennessee,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any 
individual  church. 


TABLE    6. — NUMBER   AND    MEMBERSHIP    OP    CHURCHES,    VALUE    OF    CHURCH 
EDIFICES,  AND  EXPENDITURES,  BY  ASSOCIATIONS,   1936 


ASSOCIATION 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Number 
of 
members 

VALUE  OP  CHUECH 
EDIFICES 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Total  

16 

_ 

6 
3 

201 

13 

$6,  600 

10 

$660 

Caney  Fork     __    ._  

79 
46 
76 

7 
3 
3 

3,  500 
900 
2,200 

3 
4 
3 

316 
164 
180 

Drakes  Creek  ,. 

Richland  Creek-  

TWO-SEEiD-IN'-THE-SPlRIT  'PEIEDESTHSTA'RIAN   BAPTISTS  237 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 

DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit  Predestinarian  Baptists  arose,  as  a  distinct  body 
in  America,  in  the  second  half  of  the  eighteenth  century,  by  a  protest  of  the  more 
rigid  against  what  some  considered  a  general  laxity  of  doctrine  and  looseness  of 
church  discipline  consequent  upon  the  prevalence  of  Arminian  doctrines  as  set 
forth  by  Methodism.  Its  great  leader  was  Elder  Daniel  Parker,  a  native  of 
Virginia,  who  was  ordained  in  Tennessee  in  1806  and  labored  in  that  State  and 
in  Illinois  and  Texas. 

This  doctrine  was  not  allowed  to  be  taught  during  the  dark  ages.  There  were 
a  few  men  who  contended  for  it;  one  leader  by  the  name  of  Donatist  who  lived 
250  years  after  Christ  was  here  on  earth  in  visible  form;  and  later  Peter  Waldo, 
the  founder  of  the  Waldenses,  of  medieval  times.  The  theory  of  the  Two-Seed 
as  a  principle  of  doctrine  has  existed  since  apostolic  times  and  farther  back.  The 
first  fountain  head  that  broke  out  was  back  in  the  Garden  of  Eden  when  God 
said:  "I  will  put  enmity  between  thee  and  the  woman,  and  between  thy  seed  and 
her  seed;  it  shall  bruise  thy  head  and  thou  shalt  bruise  his  heel."  Gen.  3:  15. 
After  the  Reformation  the  leaders  of  this  doctrine  had  more  liberty  and  freedom 
to  preach  and  teach  the  doctrine  of  Two-Seed. 

The  denomination  at  present  does  not  emphasize  the  extreme  Calvinistic 
doctrines  which  they  stressed  in  its  early  history,  when  these  Baptists  formed 
scattered  churches  rather  than  an  organized  denomination.  They  differed  from 
the  Primitive  Baptists  chiefly  in  the  degree  to  which  they  carried  their  theological 
opinions  and  ecclesiastical  principles  and  were  frequently  called  by  the  same 
names,  "Primitive,"  "Old  School,"  and  "Hard  Shell";  the  special  feature  of 
their  belief  was  gradually  recognized,  however,  and  they  became  popularly  known 
as  the  "Two-Seed  Baptists."  As  a  result  of  this  general  similarity,  the  distinction 
between  them  and  the  Primitive  Baptists  has  not  always  been  clearly  drawn  and 
this  fact  probably  accounts  to  some  extent  for  their  decreasing  numbers  at  suc- 
cessive censuses. 

As  distinguished  from  the  Primitive  Baptists,  the  Two-Seed  Baptists  believe 
in  the  resurrection  of  the  Body  of  Christ,  which  is  the  Church,  and  that  the  two 
seed  are  in  the  spirit  and  not  in  the  flesh.  They  emphasize  the  doctrine  of  salva- 
tion by  grace.  They  believe  that  God's  people  are  a  spiritual  generation  and 
they  did  exist  in  Christ  before  the  world  was:  Eph.  1:  4,  "According  as  he  hath 
chosen  us  in  him  before  the  foundation  of  the  world,  that  we  should  be  holy  with- 
out blame  before  him  in  love":  Eph.  1 :  7,  "In  whom  we  have  redemption  through 
his  blood,  the  forgiveness  of  sins,  according  to  the  riches  of  his  grace."  Again 
we  find  in  II  Tim.  1 :  9-10,  "Who  hath  saved  us,  and  called  us  with  an  holy  calling, 
not  according  to  our  works,  but  according  to  his  own  purpose  and  grace,  which 
was  given  us  in  Christ  Jesus  before  the  world  began,  but  is  now  made  manifest 
by  the  appearing  of  our  Savior  Jesus  Christ,  who  hath  abolished  death,  and  hath 
brought  life  and  immortality  to  light  through  the  gospel":  Prov.  8:  22-25,  "The 
Lord  possessed  me  in  the  beginning  of  his  way,  before  his  works  of  old.  I  was 
set  up  from  everlasting,  from  the  beginning,  or  ever  the  earth  was.  When  there 
were  no  depths,  I  was  brought  forth:  when  there  were  no  fountains  abounding 
with  water.  Before  the  mountains  were  settled,  before  the  hills  was  I  brought 
forth."  Therefore  we  emphasize  the  doctrine  of  salvation  by  grace  and  not  by 
works:  Eph.  2:  8-9,  "For  by  grace  are  ye  saved  through  faith;  and  that  not  of 
yourselves:  it  is  the  gift  of  God.  Not  of  works,  lest  any  man  should  boast." 

We  believe  that  the  ordinances  such  as  communion  and  foot  washing  are  taught 
in  the  Bible  and  are  to  be  observed  in  the  visible  church.  We  do  not  believe 
that  the  work  of  a  paid  ministry  is  necessary  to  save  sinners,  as  Christ  came  to 
save  sinners  and  He  said  He  finished  His  work. 

DOCTRINE 

The  phrase  "Two-Seed"  indicates  one  seed  of  good  and  one  of  evil,  both  of 
them  spiritual  and  not  of  the  flesh,  the  good  seed  emanating  from  God,  and  the 
evil  seed  from  the  devil;  the  earthly  generation  of  mankind  is  the  field  in  which 

*  This  statement,  which  differs  somewhat  from  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious  Bodies, 
1926,  has  been  revised  by  Elder  B.  E.  Little,  McMinnville,  Tenn.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form . 


238  CENS'lTR'   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

both  are  manifested,  the  field,  however,  being  no  part  of  either.  The  field  has 
no  power  of  its  own  to  resist,  but  must  and  does  develop  or  manifest  what  is  sown 
in  it,  as  shown  in  the  parable  of  the  wheat  and  the  tares.  Neither  seed  can  change 
its  character,  but  must  reproduce  after  its  kind.  We  do  not  divide  the  Adamic 
race,  nor  can  we  change  the  decrees  of  God;  but  as  He  declared  the  origin  and  the 
destiny  of  the  parent  or  progenitor  in  the  beginning,  we  claim  that,  as  He  cannot 
change,  neither  does  He  change  either  the  origin  or  destiny  of  any  one  of  His 
generation.  This  is  manifested  through  the  visible  generations  of  Adam.  Thus, 
it  is  the  crop  which  is  gathered  and  not  the  field,  the  atonement  being  for  the 
redemption  of  the  good  seed,  which  are  the  children  of  God.  Divine  justice  being 
satisfied,  then  wisdom  is  justified  of  all  her  children  which  are  the  good  seed; 
the  children  of  God  return  to  Him  in  heaven  and  the  children  of  the  devil  are 
returned  back  to  him  in  the  lower  regions  of  eternity. 

ORGANIZATION  AND  WORK 

In  their  church  government  the  Two-Seed  Baptists  are  thoroughly  independent, 
each  church  controlling  its  own  affairs.  Associations  are  formed,  but  for  spiritual 
fellowship  rather  than  for  church  management.  What  are  ordinarily  known  as 
church  activities  do  not  exist  among  them,  although  they  believe  in  good  works, 
but  not  as  the  world  looks  at  good  works.  Individuals  may  contribute  to  benev- 
olences as  they  see  fit,  but  organized  benevolence  does  not  exist. 


INDEPENDENT  BAPTIST  CHURCH  OF  AMERICA 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification. — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  Independent  Baptist  Church  of  America  for 
the  year  1936  is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these 
figures  between  urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  includes  persons  who  have  been  admit- 
ted to  the  local  churches  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by  immersion. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY   OF  STATISTICS  FOR   CHURCHES   IN   URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEBCENT  OF 
TOTAL* 

Urban 

Rural 

Clmrclies  (local  organizations),  number 

8 

129 
16 

50 
79 

1 

42 
42 

15 

27 

7 

87 
12 

35 
52 

Members,  number 

32.6 

67.4 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male  

Female  __ 

Males  per  100  females  2 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years    _  

13  years  and  over 

101 
28 

4 
4 
$9,  300 
$9,  300 
$2,  325 

$250 
3 

7 
$1,  189 
$149 
$100 

$146 
$60 
$216 
$475 
$43 
$170 

3 
6 

27 

42 

59 
28 

3 
3 

$3,  300 
$3,300 
$1,  100 
1 
$250 
2 

6 
$715 

41.6 

58  4 

Age  not  reported 

ChTircli  ecHfi^ps,  TVTmhar 

1 
1 
$6,000 
$6,000 
$6,000 

y^]^p  —  pnTnbftr  rApnrtmg 

ATKTtOTiTlt-  ^ported 

64.5 
64.5 

35.5 
35  5 

Constructed  prior  to  1936  

Average  value  per  church                      

"O^bf,  —  ruimhfif  reporting 

Amount  reported 

100.0 

Number  reporting  "no  debt" 

1 

1 

$474 
$149 
$100 

$121 
$50 
$16 
$29 
$9 
$474 

Expenditures  : 
fihurches  r6port7iig,  "nnrnhfir 

Amount  reported          .                _-.,.«  

39.9 
100.0 
100.0 

82.9 

60.1 

Salaries,  other  than  pastors' 

Repairs  and  improvements 

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest 

$25 

$10 
$200 
$446 
$34 
$119 

3 

6 

27 

17.1 

Local  relief  and  charity,  Bed  Cross,  etc  
Home  missions 

7  4 
6.1 

92.6 
93.9 

Foreign  missions                        

All  other  purposes                             

Average  expenditure  per  church 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

1  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

2  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1936  and  1926. — Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for 
comparison,  a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  Independent  Baptist 
Church  of  America  for  the  census  years  1936  and  1926. 

239 


240  CENSUS    OF    REHLIOIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMAET,  1936  AND  1926 


ITEM 

1936 

1926 

ITEM 

1936 

1926 

Church.es    (local   organizations), 
number   . 

8 

13 

Expenditures  : 
Churches  reporting,  number.. 

7 

10 

IncreEse  *  over  preceding  cen- 

Amount reported  

$1,  189 

$2,  499 

sus: 
Nximfaflt* 

—5 

Salaries,  other  than  pas- 
tors' -.    __    

$149 

Percent  2  

Repairs    and    improve- 

merits 

$100 

Members,  number 

129 

222 

All    other    current    ex- 

$779 

Increase  i  over  preceding  cen- 
sus: 

penses,    including    in- 
terest-       

$146 

Number 

—93 

Local  relief  and  charity, 

Percent 

—41  9 

Red  Cross,  etc_       

$60 

Average     membership     per 

Home  missions  

$216 

$1,  720 

church 

16 

17 

Foreign  missions 

$475 

All  other  purposes    _    

$43 

Church  edifices,  number  

4 

6 

Average     expenditure     per 

Value  —  number  reporting 

4 

6 

church  

$170 

$250 

Amount  reported 

$9,  300 

$12,  000 

Average  value  per  church. 
Debt  —  number  reporting  

$2,  325 

1 

$2,000 
1 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number.. 

3 

6 

A  in  o  wit  reported 

$250 

$425 

Officers  and  teachers 

6 

18 

Scholars 

27 

146 

1  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 


3  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 


State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  statistics  the  for  the  Independent 
Baptist  Church  of  America  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the 
number  and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in 
urban  or  rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday 
schools.  Table  4  gives  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  census 
years  1936  and  1926,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "13 
years  of  age  and  over,"  so  far  as  reported.  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  church 
edifices  and  the  amount  of  debt  on  such  property  for  1936.  Table  6  presents,  for 
1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improvements, 
benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics  of  any 
individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  tables  5  and  6  is  limited  to  the  State 
of  Minnesota,  the  only  State  in  which  so  many  as  three  churches  reported  value 
and  expenditures. 

TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBEESHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBER- 
SHIP BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

*» 

"S* 

STATE 

Q  "^ 

£ 

3 

a 

M 

£ 

3 

o 

I 

1 

•3 

1 

'o  M 

,CJ 

O  CD 

CO 

1 

EH 

p 

rt 

£ 

tf 

^ 

(^ 

O 

O 

00 

United  States  

8 

i 

7 

129 

42 

87 

50 

79 

3 

6 

27 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

~ 

Wisconsin 

1 

1 

34 

34 

21 

13 

1 

2 

6 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 

Minnesota  ..  

5 

i 

4 

82 

42 

40 

25 

57 

2 

4 

21 

Iowa 

1 

1 

11 

11 

3 

g 

PACIFIC; 

Washington 

1 

1 

2 



2 

1 

1 

INDEPENDENT   BAPTIST    CHURCH   OF   AMERICA 


241 


TABLE   4=. — NUMBER  AND   MEMBERSHIP  OF   CHUBCHES,    1936   AND   1926,   AND 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 

[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  in  either  1936  or  1926] 


STATE 

NUMBEB  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBEBS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE, 
1936 

1936 

1926 

1936 

1936 

13  years 
and  over 

Age  not 
reported 

United  States    .. 

8 

13 

129 

222 

101 

28 

Minnesota 

5 
13 

7 
6 

82 
47 

114 
108 

67 
34 

15 
13 

Other  States.  _  .  

*  Includes:  Wisconsin,  1;  Iowa,  1;  and  Washington,  1. 

TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  AMOUNT  OP  CHURCH  DEBT  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting  value  of  edifices] 


STATE 

Total 
number 
of 
churches 

Number 
of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHUBCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHUBCH 
EDIFICES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

United  States 

8 

4 
_ 

1 

4 

89,300 

1 

8250 

Minnesota 

5 
3 

3 
1 

8,300 
1,000 

1 

250 

Other  States  1 

i  Includes:  Wisconsin,  Iowa,  and  Washington. 

TABLE  6. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber of 
churches 

EXPENDITURES 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Sala- 
ries, 
other 
than 
pastors' 

Re- 
pairs 
and 
im- 
prove- 
ments 

Other 
cur- 
rent 
ex- 
penses, 
in- 
clud- 
ing in- 
terest 

Local 

relief 
and 
charity 

Home 
mis- 
sions 

For- 
eign 
mis- 
sions 

All 
other 
pur- 
poses 

United  States.... 
Minnesota  

8 

7 
5 
2 

$1,189 
764~ 
425 

$149 

$100 

ioo" 

$146 
136 
10 

$60 

$216 

$475 
___ 

250 

$43 

43 

5 
3 

149 

60 

51 
165 

Other  States  * 

i  Includes:  Wisconsin,  Iowa,  and  Washington. 


242  CENSUS'    OF   RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  l 
DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

Between  1870  and  1890  some  Swedish  Free  Baptists  emigrated  to  the  United 
States  and  settled  in  different  localities.  A  number  of  these  came  together  in 
June  1893  at  Dassel,  Minn.,  for  their  first  conference,  and  thereafter  a  yearly 
conference  was  held  at  different  places. 

At  the  first  conference  they  called  their  body  the  Swedish  Independent  Baptist 
Church,  but  later  changed  the  name  to  Scandinavian  Independent  Baptist  De- 
nomination of  America.  In  1912  one  section  of  the  group  was  incorporated, 
and  the  name  was  changed  again  to  Scandinavian  Independent  Baptist  Denomi- 
nation of  the  United  States  of  America.  The  others,  who  had  not  joined  in  this 
incorporation,  held  conferences  and  about  1923  associated  themselves  under 
the  name  of  the  Scandinavian  Free  Baptist  Society  of  the  United  States  of  Amer- 
ica. The  two  factions  finally  came  together  at  a  conference  held  at  Garden 
Valley,  Wis.,  in  November  1927,  adopting  the  name  Independent  Baptist 
Church  of  America. 

DOCTRINE 

The  Independent  Baptist  Church  of  America  agrees  with  other  evangelical 
bodies  on  many  points  of  doctrine,  believing  that  "Christ  tasted  death  for  every 
man/7  that  "He  arose  again,"  and  "every  soul  shall  arise  and  stand  before  His 
judgment  seat."  They  believe  and  teach  also  that  repentance  and  ( baptism  in 
water  by  immersion  are  prerequisite  to  membership,  as  well  as  participation  in 
the  Lord's  Supper.  They  also  believe  in  the  laying  on  of  hands  at  the  time  of 
acceptation  into  the  church.  They  believe  in  the  authority  and  necessity  of 
civil  government  and  at  the  General  Conference  held  in  Roseland,  Minn.,  June  8, 
1898,  a  resolution  was  adopted  pledging  the  church  to  obedience  and  loyalty  to 
the  Government,  in  all  of  its  demands,  except  what  is  contrary  to  the  Word  of 
God,  as  participation  in  war,  which,  according  to  their  expressed  conviction,  is 
contrary  to  the  Word  of  God.  The  resolution  contained  a  formal  request  that 
young  people  of  this  denomination  be  exempt  from  service  in  case  of  war. 

WORK 

The  whole  object  or  purpose  of  the  denomination  is  to  carry  on  Christian 
mission  work  in  the  United  States  and  foreign  countries;  to  spread  the  Gospel  in 
the  precepts  of  Christ  and  His  Apostles;  to  encourage  one  another  to  love  and 
good  works;  to  build  up  the  church  according  to  the  truth  given  in  God's  Word, 
both  as  to  membership  and  spiritual  growth;  and  to  await  Christ's  second  coming. 

1  This  statement,  which  is  substantially  the  same  as  that  published  in  vol.  II  of  the  Report  on  Religious 
Bodies,  1926,  has  been  revised  by  Elder  O.  M.  Sundell,  of  the  Independent  Baptist  Church  of  America, 
Minneapolis,  Minn.,  and  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


AMERICAN  BAPTIST  ASSOCIATION 


STATISTICS 

Summary  for  the  United  States,  with  urban-rural  classification, — A  general 
summary  of  the  statistics  for  the  American  Baptist  Association  for  the  year  1936 
is  presented  in  table  1,  which  shows  also  the  distribution  of  these  figures  between 
urban  and  rural  territory. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  those  persons  who  have  been 
admitted  to  the  local  churches  upon  confession  of  their  faith  and  baptism  by 
immersion. 

TABLE   1. — SUMMARY   OF  STATISTICS   FOB   CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 

TERRITORY,  1936 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PEECENT  OF 
TOTAL  1 

Urban 

Rural 

Churches  (local  organizations),  number     

1,064 

115,  022 
108 

44,405 
61,  487 
9,130 
72.2 

2,076 
93,  955 
18,  991 
2.2 

895 
848 
$1,507,798 
$1,  444,  215 
$63,583 
$1,778 
59 
$122,  215 
563 

50 
44 
$69,  710 

1,020 
$352,  529 
$174,337 
$20,422 
$30,  610 

$18,477 

$36,  152 
$10,  584 
$16,  175 
$6,657 
$10,  164 
$28,  951 
$346 

104 

18,  149 
175 

6,869 
9,942 
1,338 
69.1 

739 
14,361 
3,049 
4.9 

88 
83 
$488,  168 
$483,308 
$4,860 
$5,882 

$92,  169 
48 

12 
10 
$25,  500 

102 
$116,  281 
$47,  164 
$7,  196 
$6,819 

$8,  696 

$19,  258 
$2,  815 
$3,256 
$1,  980 
$6,379 
$12,  718 
$1,  140 

960 

96,  873 
101 

37,  536 
51,  545 
7,792 
72  8 

1,337 
79,  594 
15,  942 
1.7 

807 
765 
$1,019,630 
$960,  907 
$58T723 
$1,333 
44 
$30,046 
515 

38 
34 

$44,210 

918 
$236,248 
$127,  173 
$13,226 
$23,791 

$9,781 

$16,  894 

$7,  769 
$12,  919 
$4,677 
$3,785 
$16,  233 
$257 

9.8 
15.8 

90.2 

84.  2 

MPS  Tubers,  •nnmhfir 

Average  membership  per  church 

Membership  by  sex: 
Male 

15.5 
16  2 

14  7 

84.5 
83.8 
85.3 

Female 

Sex  not  reported 

Males  per  100  females 

Membership  by  age: 
Under  13  years                                      

35.6 
15  3 
16.1 

64.4 
84.7 
83.9 

13  years  and  over 

Age  not  reported 

Percent  under  13  years  ^ 

Church,  edifices  number 

9  8 
9.8 
32.4 
33.5 
7.6 

90.2 
90.2 
67.6 
66.5 
92.4 

Valu6'  —  'number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

Constructed  prior  to  1936 

Constructed,  wholly  or  in  part,  in  1936 
Average  value  per  church 

JDebt~~number  reporting 

Amount  reported                            -  -  

754 
8  5 

24.6 

91.5 

Number  reporting  "no  debt"                    

Value    number  reporting 

Amount  reported 

36  6 

10.0 
33.0 
27.1 
35.2 
22.3 

47.1 

53.3 
26.6 
20.1 
29.7 
62.8 
43.9 

63.4 

90.0 
67.0 
72.9 
64.8 
77.7 

52.9 

46.7 
73.4 
79.9 
70.3 
37.2 
56.1 

Expenditures: 
Churches  reporting  number                 -    

Amount  reported                                          

Pastors'  salaries 

All  other  salaries 

Repairs  and  improvements 

Payment  on  church  debt,  excluding  in- 
terest                                     

All  other  current  expenses,  including  in- 
terest                       

Local  relief  and  charity,  Bed  Cross,  etc.  .  . 
Home  missions      __    

Foreign  missions                            -    

To  general  headquarters  for  distribution.  _ 
All  other  purposes           -  

Averaere  exoenditure  oer  church  

'  Percent  not  shown  where  base  is  less  than  100. 

*  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


275318—41- 


-17 


243 


244 


CEN'SiUS1   OF  RELIGIOUS    BODIES,    1936 


TABLE   1. — SUMMARY   OF  STATISTICS   FOR   CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND   RURAL 
TERRITORY,  1936 — Continued 


ITEM 

Total 

In  urban 
territory 

In  rural 
territory 

PERCENT  OF 
TOTAL  J 

Urban 

Rural 

Sunday  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number  

798 
6,677 
50,  008 

16 
122 
1,091 

47 
228 
1,729 

89 
1,094 
10,  657 

4 
61 
609 

8 
65 
518 

709 
5,583 
39,351 

12 
61 

482 

39 
163 
1,211 

11  2 
16.4 
21.3 

88.8 
83  6 

78.7 

Officers  and  teachers..  ._       _         .  _ 

Scholars  

Summer  vacation  Bible  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers 

50.0 
55  8 

50  0 
44.2 

Scholars  

Weekday  religious  schools  : 
Churches  reporting,  number 

Officers  and  teachers             --      -  -  ... 

28.5 
30.0 

71.5 
70.0 

Scholars      .  .                                     

*  Percent  not  shown  whore  base  is  less  than  100. 

Comparative  data,  1936  and  1926. — -Table  2  presents,  in  convenient  form  for 
comparison,  a  summary  of  the  available  statistics  of  the  American  Baptist  Asso- 
ciation for  the  census  years  1936  and  1926. 

TABLE  2. — COMPARATIVE  SUMMARY,  1936  AND  1926 


ITEM 

1936 

1936 

ITEM 

1936 

1926 

Churches     (local     organiza- 
tions), number 

1,064 

1,431 

Exp  enditures—  C  ontmued  . 
Amount  reported..  

$352,  529 

$482,  045 

Increase  1  over  preceding 

Pastors'  salaries    ,  -- 

$174,  337 

census.' 

All  other  salaries  

$20,  422 

Number 

—367 

Repairs  and  improve- 

Percent-          

-25.6 

ments    ._  

$30,  610 

Members,  nomtwr 

115,022 

117,  858 

Payment  on  church 
debt,  excluding  in- 

> $351,  264 

Increase  *  over  preceding 

terest        .  

$18,  477 

census: 
Number  

Percent 

-2,836 
—2.4 



All  other  current  ex- 
penses,    including 
interest 

$36,  152 

Average  membership  per 
church          -. 

103 

82 

Local  relief  and  char- 
ity, Red  Cross,  etc 

$10,  584 

Home  missions  . 

$16,  175 

Church  edifices,  number  
Value  —  number  reporting. 
Amount  reported  
Average    value    per 
church..     

895 
848 
$1,507,798 

$1,778 

1,066 
1,054 
$1,  832,  546 

$1,739 

Foreign  missions  
To  general  headquar- 
ters for  distribution. 
All  other  purposes  
Not  classified     .  _  - 

$6,  657 

$10,  164 
$28,  951 

•  $121,406 
$9,  375 

Debt—  number  reporting 
Amount  reported 

59 
$122,215 

71 
$58,  757 

Average  expenditure  per 
church 

$346 

$370 

Parsonages,  number 

.50 

Sunday  schools  : 

Value—  number  reporting^ 
Amount  reported  

44 
$69,  710 

38 

$76,  050 

Churches  reporting,  num- 
ber   

798 

918 

Expenditures  : 

Churches  re  porting,  num- 

Officers and  teachers  
Scholars  

6,677 
50,  008 

6,120 
56,  228 

ber  

1,020 

1,303 

i  A  minus  sign  (— )  denotes  decrease. 

State  tables. — Tables  3,  4,  5,  and  6  present  the  statistics  for  the  American 
Baptist  Association  by  States.  Table  3  gives  for  each  State  for  1936  the  number 
and  membership  of  the  churches  classified  according  to  their  location  in  urban  or 
rural  territory,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday  schools.  Table  4 
gives  the  number  and  membership  of  the  churches  for  the  census  years  1936  and 
1926,  together  with  the  membership  for  1936  classified  as  "under  13  years  of  age" 
and  "13  years  of  age  and  over."  Table  5  shows  the  value  of  churches  and  par- 
sonages and  the  amount  of  debt  on  church  edifices  for  1936.  Table  6  presents, 
for  1936,  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current  expenses,  improve- 
ments, benevolences,  etc.  In  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics  of 
any  individual  church,  separate  presentation  in  table  6  is  limited  to  those  States 
in  which  three  or  more  churches  reported  expenditures. 


AMERICAN    BAPTIST   ASSOCIATION 


245 


TABLE  3. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES  IN  URBAN  AND  RURAL 
TERRITORY,  MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX,  AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF  MEM- 
BERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BT  SEX 

SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

13 
o 
H 

a 

03 
.Q 

£ 

"c3 
»-j 

s 

"3 
"o 
H 

5 

"c3 
P3 

•3 

% 

Female 

Sex  not  reported 

1 

«2 
o 
o 

cu 
S 

1 

Churches  reporting 

Officers  and  teachers 

Scholars 

United  States 

1,064 

104 

960 

59 
5 

q 

23 

4 
33 
36 

67 

346 
20 
69 
274 

2 
12 

1 

115,  022 
375 

3,893 
358 

1,127 
1,  963 

563 

5,582 
4,495 
9,119 

37,424 

4,  057 
7,773 
36.545 

402 

1,196 
80 

18,  149 

96,  873 

44,405 

81,  487 

9,130 

72  2|  798 

6,677 

50,  003 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

1 

60 
5 

1 
1 

375 
63 

163 

1,526 
97 

377 
690 

115 
1,9P4 
1,946 
3,794 

14,  261 
1,347 
2,614 
14,  676 

192 

543 
40 

212 

2,046 
129 

500 
1,088 

188 
2,970 
2,324 
4,821 

20,734 
1.764 
3,685 
20,063 

270 

653 

40 

76  9 

74  6 
75  2 

75.4 
63  4 

77.1 
67.1 
83.7 
78  7 

68  P 
76.4 
70  9 
73  1 

71.1 

83  2 
CO 

1 

43 

5 

5 
19 

2 

14 
28 
53 

297 
18 
62 
234 

1 

15 
1 

45 

344 

39 

35 
141 

15 
106 
190 
35S 

2,215 
152 
530 
2,360 

7 

132 

8 

250 

2,149 
212 

285 
1,011 

115 

850 
1,614 
3.424 

16.934 
1,204 
3,693 
17,  403 

45 

859 
60 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri.  

3,830 
358 

1,137 

1,481 

472 
4,897 
3,939 
8,334 

32,  981 
3,218 
6,563 
28,619 

212 

752 
80 

321 
132 

260 
185 

230 
618 
225 
504 

2,429 
946 

1,474 
1,806 

Kansas,  _ 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Georgia     _  ..    . 

9 

Florida 

28 

5 

37 
41 
72 

379 
24 
76 
307 

4 

15 
1 

5 

1 
4 
5 
5 

33 

4 
7 
33 

2 

3 

482 

91 
685 
5*>6 

785 

4,443 
839 
1,210 
7,926 

250 
444 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky  

Tennessee- 

Alabama 

Mississippi  ,_  __ 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana  

Oklahoma  . 

Texas  . 

MOUNTAIN: 
Colorado 

PACIFIC: 
Oregon 

California 

»  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 


246 


CENSUS   OF   KELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 


TABLE  4. — NUMBER  AND   MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,   1936  AND   1926,   AND 
MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE  IN  1936,  BY  STATES 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND  STATE 

NUMBER  OF 
CHURCHES 

NUMBER  OF 
MEMBERS 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  AGE,  1936 

1936 

1926 

1936 

1936 

Under 
13 
years 

13  years 
and 
over 

Age 
not  re- 
ported 

Percent 
under 
13i 

United  States  

1,064 
1 

1,431 

115,022 

117,  858 

2,076 

93,955 

18,991 

2.2 

EAST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio 

375 

3,893 
358 

1,137 
1,963 

24 
69 

351 

3,030 
226 

840 
1,614 

558 
4,415 
4,024 
6,816 

31,  176 
3,451 
5,837 
30,408 

122 
1,087 

6.4 
2  2 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri  _                   ._ 

60 
5 

9 

28 

5 
37 
41 

72 

379 
24 
76 
307 

4 

15 
1 

23 

1,300 

794 
132 

287 
346 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Georgia 

10 
3 

5 
151 
46 
33 

418 
14 
184 
1,040 

1  2 
.  2 

9 
3  3 
1.1 
.5 

1.3 

.4 
3  1 
3.3 

Florida     .                        

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky 

563 
5,  582 

Tennessee 

1,016 
425 
2,270 

5,830 
592 
1,752 
5,097 

340 

30 

80 

Alabama  

36 
61 

560 
34 
97 
G20 

4,495 
9,119 

37,  424 
4,057 
7,773 
36,  545 

462 
1,196 

3,  043 
7,028 

41,  281 
3,996 
7,357 
53,  853 

Mississippi 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL- 
Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN: 
Colorado 

PACIFIC: 
Oregon 

79 

0.8 

California 

80 

i  Based  on  membership  with  age  classification  reported. 


AMERICAN   BAPTIST  ASSOCIATION 


247 


TABLE  5. — VALUE  OF  CHURCHES  AND  PARSONAGES    AND  AMOUNT  OF  CHURCH 

DEBT  BY  STATES,   1936 


GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION 
AND  STATE 

Total 
num- 
ber of 
churches 

Num- 
ber of 
church 
edifices 

VALUE  OF  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

DEBT  ON  CHURCH 
EDIFICES 

VALUE  OF 
PARSONAGES 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 

Churches 
reporting 

Amount 
$69,  710 

United  States 

1,064 

895 

848 

$1,  507,  798 

59 

$122,  215 

44 

EAST  NOETH  CENTRAL: 
Ohio  

1 

60 
5 

9 

28 

5 

37 

41 

72 

379 
24 
76 
307 

4 

15 
1 

1 

0) 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri 

43 

5 

9 
23 

4 
33 
28 
65 

324 

23 
51 
2G9 

4 

13 
1 

40 
5 

8 
23 

4 
32 
27 
63 

305 
23 

49 
252 

4 

12 
1 

51,  280 
11,500 

10,000 
25,000 

5,200 
53,  557 
20,050 
76,  050 

340,  693 
26,  400 
85,900 

768,  468 

8,700 
}   225,000 

5 

1,105 

Kansas 

1 

C) 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC 
Georgia,..        

1 
1 

250 
100 

Florida 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky      

Tennessee 

4 

972 

Alabama 

1 
2 

6 

8 

5,950 

Mississippi  __ 

2 

17 

2 
1 

24 

100 

21,  772 
2,050 
35 
93,031 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma    

5 
21 

4,260 
39,800 

Texas 

MOUNTAIN- 
Colorado 

PACIFIC. 
Oregon 

2 

2,800 

{      ! 

0,800 

o; 

12,900 

California 

C  ombinations 

1  Amount  included  in  figures  on  the  line  designated  "Combinations,"  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics 
of  any  individual  church. 

2  Amount  for  California  combined  with  figures  for  Oregon,  to  avoid  disclosing  the  statistics  of  any  indi- 
vidual church. 


248  CENSUS  OF  RELIGIOUS  BODIES,   1936 

TABLE  6, — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presentation  is  limited  to  States  having  3  or  more  churches  reporting] 


E 

XPENDITURE 

3 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 

STATE 

number 
of 
churches 

Churches 
reporting 

Total 
amount 

Pastors' 
salaries 

All  other 
salaries 

Repairs 
and 
improve- 
ments 

United  States  

1,064 

1,020 

$352,  529 

$174,337 

$20,  422 

$30,  610 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri 

60 

57 

14,  164 

7,833 

836 

1,017 

Kansas 

5 

5 

1,919 

1,121 

94 

111 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Georgia          ...  . 

9 

7 

2,344 

1,025 

71 

582 

Florida                   .  . 

28 

28 

7,987 

4,142 

702 

328 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Kentucky            .- 

5 

5 

803 

447 

77 

Tennessee 

37 

35 

9,234 

5,348 

619 

814 

Alabama 

41 

41 

8,363 

3,762 

949 

2,067 

Mississippi 

72 

70 

20,519 

11,211 

1,162 

2,335 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas  _     .  _  

379 

365 

89,  427 

46,071 

3,815 

10,  482 

Louisiana       .  

24 

24 

9,340 

5,873 

579 

623 

Oklahoma 

76 

76 

23,  795 

13,  523 

1,580 

959 

Texas 

307 

289 

145,  430 

64,  737 

9,282 

10,  877 

PACIFIC: 
Oregota 

15 

15 

14,  723 

6,689 

36 

286 

Other  States 

6 

i  3 

4,481 

2,555 

620 

129 

GEOGRAPHIC  DIVISION  AND 
STATE 

EXPENDITURES—  continued 

Payment 
on  church 
debt,  ex- 
cluding 
interest 

Other 
current 
expenses, 
including 
interest 

Local 
relief 
and 
charity 

Home 
missions 

Foreign 
missions 

To  gen- 
eral head- 
quarters 

All 
other 
purposes 

United  States       .  .    . 

$18,  477 

200 
192 

275 

74 

$36,  152 

$10,  584 

$16,  175 

$6,  657 

$10,  164 

$28,  951 

WEST  NORTH  CENTRAL: 
Missouri                   -  - 

882 
60 

97 
1,128 

36 

476 
70 
677 

8,753 
1,118 
1,889 
17,  838 

2,738 
390 

155 

845 
108 

126 
539 

70 
207 
544 
1,347 

3,215 
232 
1,620 
5,836 

1,186 
300 

574 
20 

18 
49 

106 
74 
266 
552 

1,693 
35 
339 

1,984 

847 
100 

72 
12 

1,750 
201 

19 
462 

Kansas 

SOUTH  ATLANTIC: 
Georgia 

131 
517 

67 
744 
308 
1,070 

2,612 
153 
709 
3,818 

250 
50 

Florida  _  

46 

EAST  SOUTH  CENTRAL- 

T"Tf>nt,nf>ky 

Tennessee.--  ~    - 

219 

70 
15 
168 

1,082 
205 
289 
7,953 

663 
382 
1,922 

5,927 
219 
1,962 
14,068 

1,291 
85 

Alabama    _     

Mississippi 

75 

5,777 
303 
925 
9,037 

1,400 

WEST  SOUTH  CENTRAL: 
Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

PACIFIC: 
Oregon  

Other  States  

252 

i  Includes:  Ohio,  1;  Colorado,  1;  and  California*  1. 


AMERICAN   BAPTIST   ASSOCIATION  249 

HISTORY,  DOCTRINE,  AND  ORGANIZATION  1 

DENOMINATIONAL  HISTORY 

The  American  Baptist  Association  is  not  a  separate  and  distinct  denomination, 
but  it  is  a  separate  and  distinct  group  of  Baptists.  They  separated  themselves 
from  the  convention  groups  because  they  regarded  the  methods  and  polity  of  the 
convention  as  an  innovation  among  Baptists.  They  claim  that  their  associations 
are  a  direct  continuance  of  the  cooperative  work  in  missions,  benevolences,  etc., 
since  the  time  of  Christ  and  the  Apostles.  They  sincerely  believe  that  those 
Baptists  who  work  with  the  conventions,  though  they  may  be  orthodox  in  faith, 
have  departed  from  the  New  Testament  principles  of  church  cooperation. 

The  purpose  of  this  body  is  to  do  missionary,  evangelistic,  benevolent,  and  educa- 
tional work  throughout  the  world.  They  do  not  unionize  with  other  religious 
sects  and  organizations  because  they  believe  that  their  churches  are  the  only  true 
churches;  they  believe  also  that  the  Lord  Jesus  Christ  gave  the  commission  (Matt. 
28:  18-20)  to  the  churches,  and  that  they  are,  therefore,  the  divine  custodians  of 
the  truth,  and  that  they  only  have  the  divine  right  of  carrying  out  the  commands 
of  Jesus  as  stated  in  the  great  commission,  and  of  executing  the  laws  of  the  king- 
dom, and  of  administering  the  ordinances  of  the  Gospel. 

They  believe  that  each  church  is  an  autonomous,  independent  body,  and  that 
the  churches  are  amenable  only  to  Christ  as  Lord  and  Master.  They  believe 
also  that  each  church  is  on  a  perfect  equality  with  every  other  like  church,  and 
therefore  should  have  an  equal  representation  in  all  their  associated  work. 

DOCTRINE 

The  American  Baptist  Association  accepts  the  New  Hampshire  Confession  of 
Faith  that  has  been  so  long  held  by  American  Baptists.  They  believe  in:  The 
infallible  verbal  inspiration  of  the  whole  Bible;  the  Triune  God;  the  Genesis 
account  of  creation;  the  Deity  of  Jesus  Christ;  the  virgin  birth  of  Christ;  the 
sufferings  and  death  of  Christ  as  vicarious  and  substitutionary;  the  bodily  resur- 
rection of  Christ  and  the  bodily  resurrection  and  glorification  of  His  saints; 
they  believe  in  the  second  coming  of  Christ,  personal  and  bodily  as  the  crowning 
event  of  the  gospel  age,  and  that  His  coming  will  be  premillennial;  the  Bible 
doctrine  of  eternal  punishment  of  the  wicked;  that  in  the  carrying  out  of  the 
commands  of  Jesus  in  the  great  commission,  the  churches  are  the  only  units, 
all  exercising  equal  authority,  and  that  responsibility  should  be  met  by  them 
according  to  their  several  abilities;  that  all  cooperative  bodies  such  as  conventions, 
associations,  etc.,  are  only  advisory  bodies  and  cannot  exercise  any  authority 
whatsoever  over  the  churches.  They  believe  furthermore  that  salvation  is 
wholly  by  grace  through  faith  without  any  admixture  of  law  or  works,  and  that 
the  church  was  instituted  during  the  personal  ministry  of  Jesus  Christ  on  the 
earth.  They  believe  also  in  the  absolute  separation  of  church  and  State,  and  in 
the  principle  of  absolute  religious  freedom. 

ORGANIZATION 

They  believe  that  in  the  strict  sense  the  American  Baptist  Association  is  not 
an  organization,  but  is  a  cooperation  of  the  churches  composing  it.  But  since 
all  the  churches  cannot  meet  in  the  annual  meetings,  churches  elect  three  mes- 
sengers who  represent  them  in  these  annual  meetings,  and  for  convenience  in 
their  deliberations  the  messengers  when  assembled  in  their  annual  meetings  elect 
a  president,  and  three  vice  presidents;  two  recording  secretaries;  and  a  secretary- 
treasurer.  They  are  strictly  congregational  in  their  polity.  All  questions  are 
settled  by  a  majority  vote  of  the  messengers  present,  except  amendments  to  their 
Articles  of  Agreement,  and  such  questions  which  are  required  under  parliamentary 
law  to  be  settled  by  a  two-thirds  majority  vote  of  the  messengers  present. 

The  American  Baptist  Association  proper  never  meets  since  it  would  be  a 
physical  impossibility  for  all  the  churches  composing  it  to  meet  at  one  time. 
Hence  the  annual  meetings  are  called  "The  meeting  of  the  messengers  composing 
the  American  Baptist  Association. " 


1  This  statement  was  furnished  by  Dr,  J.  E.  Cobb,  secretary-treasurer,  American  Baptist  Association, 
Texarkana,  Ark,-Tex.,  and  has  been  approved  by  him  in  its  present  form. 


250  CENSUS   OF   RELIGIOUS   BODIES,    1936 

WORK 

.The  missionary  work  of  the  churches  of  the  American  Baptist  Association  is 
divided  into  three  phases:  (1)  Associational  missions.  This  is  missionary 
work  done  by  a  group  of  churches  composing  a  district  association  usually  the 
size  of  a  county.  (2)  State  missions.  This  is  missionary  work  done  by  State 
associations  working  in  harmony  with  the  churches  composing  the  American 
Baptist  Association.  (3)  Interstate  and  foreign  missions  This  is  missionary 
work  done  by  all  the  churches  hi  the  nation  cooperating  with  the  churches  com- 
posing the  churches  of  the  American  Baptist  Association.  Interstate  missions  is 
work  done  by  missionaries  from  State  to  State;  foreign  mission  work,  of  course,  is 
that  done  in  foreign  countries. 

The  benevolent  work  is  usually  carried  on  by  the  district  and  State  associations. 
Several  States  maintain  orphanages  and  this  is  benevolent  work.  Churches  and 
district  associations  have  funds  to  help  support  the  poor  and  indigent  in  their 
bounds. 

Educational  work  is  carried  on  (1)  by  the  individual  churches  through  their 
Sunday  schools  and  training  departments.  Sunday  school  and  young  people's 
literature  is  published  by  the  Baptist  Sunday  School  Committee  at  Texarkana, 
Ark.-Tex.  This  literature  goes  into  practically  all  the  States  of  the  Union. 
(2)  Religious  newspapers  are  published  by  individuals  and  churches  for  the  dis- 
semination of  information  concerning  the  work.  (3)  There  are  religious  colleges 
and  Bible  institutes  where  men  are  trained  for  the  ministry.  The  medium  for  the 
distribution  of  funds  of  the  American  Baptist  Association  is  the  secretary-treasurer 
whose  headquarters  are  at  Texarkana,  Ark.-Tex. 


CHRISTIAN  UNITY  BAPTIST  ASSOCIATION 


STATISTICS 

The  data  given  for  1936  represent  seven  active  organizations  of  the  Christian 
Unity  Baptist  Association,  all  reported  as  being  in  rural  territory.  The  classi- 
fication of  membership  by  age  shows  all  members  reported  as  being  "13  years  of 
age  and  over." 

Four  church  edifices  were  reported  with  a  value  of  $1,450.  No  parsonages  were 
reported. 

The  membership  of  this  denomination  consists  of  persons  who  have  been  ad- 
mitted to  the  local  church  upon  profession  of  faith  and  baptism  by  immersion. 

The  Christian  Unity  Baptist  Association  was  not  reported  prior  to  1936,  hence 
no  comparative  data  are  available. 

State  tables. — Tables  1  and  2  present  the  statistics  for  the  Christian  Unity 
Baptist  Association  by  States.  Table  1  gives  for  each  State  the  number  and 
membership  of  the  churches,  membership  classified  by  sex,  and  data  for  Sunday 
schools.  Table  2  presents  the  church  expenditures,  showing  separately  current 
expenses,  improvements,  benevolences,  etc.  Separate  presentation  in  table  2  is 
limited  to  the  State  of  North  Carolina,  the  only  State  in  which  three  or  more 
churches  reported  expenditures,  in  order  to  avoid  disclosing  the  financial  statistics 
of  any  individual  church,  and  for  this  reason  no  table  is  given  showing  the  value 
of  church  edifices. 

TABLE  1. — NUMBER  AND  MEMBERSHIP  OF  CHURCHES,   MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX, 
AND  SUNDAY  SCHOOLS,  BY  STATES,  1936 


STATE 

Num- 
ber of 
church- 
es 

MEMBERSHIP 

MEMBERSHIP  BY  SEX 

SUNDAY  SCHOOLS 

Num- 
ber 

Aver- 
age per 
church 

Male 

Fe- 
male 

Males 
per  100 
fe- 
males l 

Churches 
reporting 

Officers 
and 
teach- 
ers 

Schol- 
ars 

United  States  

7 

188 

27 

65 

123 

53  8 

3 

13 

112 

Virginia  

1 
4 
2 

11 
125 
52 

11 
31 
26 

4 
45 
16 

7 
80 
36 

1 
1 

1 

6 
6 
1 

35 

60 
17 

North  Carolina  _  .  . 

Tennessee     

i  Ratio  not  shown  where  number  of  females  is  less  than  100. 

TABLE  2. — CHURCH  EXPENDITURES  BY  STATES,  1936 
[Separate  presen